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Daily Kos

Cartoon: Have you heard...

If you enjoy this work, it’s more important than ever to support it— join Sparky’s List! And remember, if you missed out on the sold-out Kickstarter career compilation, the second edition is now available from IDW Publishing.

Roy Moore may have lost, but Breitbart’s Steve Bannon has a field of awful candidates ready for 2018

Here are some of the racist, conspiratorial, and misinforming candidates Bannon has thrown his weight behind
Salon: in-depth news, politics, business, technology & culture Salon

Roy Moore may have lost, but Breitbart’s Steve Bannon has a field of awful candidates ready for 2018

Here are some of the racist, conspiratorial, and misinforming candidates Bannon has thrown his weight behind

No, Oprah should not run for president

Oprah gave a fantastic speech at the Golden Globes. That being said—she should not throw her hat in the ring for the Democratic nomination for president in 2020. As a matter of fact, many of the folks currently being thought of for that same nomination shou
Daily Kos

No, Oprah should not run for president

Oprah gave a fantastic speech at the Golden Globes. That being said—she should not throw her hat in the ring for the Democratic nomination for president in 2020. As a matter of fact, many of the folks currently being thought of for that same nomination should not throw their hat in the in ring either. Some of those names that have been thrown around are: Businessmen/women: Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg  Dallas Mavericks’ owner Mark Cuban Former Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz COO of Facebook Sheryl Sandberg  Politicians: Virginia Senator Tim Kaine  L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti Hillary Clinton Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe Former Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick New York Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown California Gov. Jerry Brown Connecticut Sen. Chris Murphy New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker California Sen. Kamala D. Harris New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren Former Vice President Joe Biden Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders Celebrities: Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson Oprah Winfrey Private Citizen: Michelle Obama Now we have the list, what do we do about it? First off, the country cannot be run like a business. So the titans of industry are immediately crossed off the list. I do not care how many billions of dollars a person has made, how they have grown a company from a corner in their garage to multinational corporation. Business and government are not the same thing and take entirely different skill sets. The government is not set up to make a profit—this idea that has permeated into the left from the right is a bad one and should be put out of its misery for good.

DNC to take up 2020 presidential nomination rules, must reject voter suppression by caucuses

(First in a series.) On Jan. 19-20, 2018, the Democratic National Committee (DNC) Rules and Bylaws Committee will take up the Unity and Reform Commission’s (URC) proposed recommendations for reform of the 2020 Presidential Nomination Rules. You can rea
Daily Kos

DNC to take up 2020 presidential nomination rules, must reject voter suppression by caucuses

(First in a series.) On Jan. 19-20, 2018, the Democratic National Committee (DNC) Rules and Bylaws Committee will take up the Unity and Reform Commission’s (URC) proposed recommendations for reform of the 2020 Presidential Nomination Rules. You can read the report here (PDF). The report addresses four distinct topics. Today I address the URC’s violation of its mandate and its recommendation to support voter suppression through caucuses. The URC was a fiasco that ignored its prime directive: to encourage the use of primaries over caucuses. The Commission shall make recommendations to encourage the expanded use of primary elections. The Commission failed to do that, violating its mandate. Instead the URC report states: The Commission understands and respects the role caucuses have played in the  nominating process to cultivate and grow grassroots participation and build the party, but acknowledges the need to develop better guidelines for State Parties on caucuses to ensure increased involvement and easier accessibility. The URC tabled a proposal to require state parties to use primaries when provided for by individual states. 

The most vulnerable House members of 2018, in two charts

It’s not too presumptuous to start talking about a “wave election” for this November’s midterm. For one thing, wave elections aren’t even that unusual in midterm elections; going back to the Civil War, the average loss for the party that controls th
Daily Kos

The most vulnerable House members of 2018, in two charts

It’s not too presumptuous to start talking about a “wave election” for this November’s midterm. For one thing, wave elections aren’t even that unusual in midterm elections; going back to the Civil War, the average loss for the party that controls the White House in a midterm is 32 seats. The presidential party invariably thinks “but this time it’s going to be different!” And then, invariably, partisans for the party in power get complacent or get their feelings hurt, members of the party out of power get enraged and feel their very existence is threatened, and swing voters freak out that the party that they just voted for is either failing to fulfill its promises, or is fulfilling its promises too aggressively. It’s a phenomenon political scientists call thermostatic public opinion. But we’re also seeing all sorts of flashing red lights on the instrument panel. Retirements in the House—especially among Republican members, who can probably sense things are going to go not so well this November—are starting to pile up. In fact, they’re coming at an unusually high rate; with the retirements of Darrell Issa and Ed Royce this week, we’re already up to 30 GOP retirements, and most states haven’t hit their filing deadlines yet. Generic ballot House polling shows Democrats opening up a wide advantage; different aggregators will give you different results, but most see a low-double-digit lead. FiveThirtyEight, for instance, currently sees a 10 point advantage for the Democrats, though some recent polls have seen spikes as high as 17 percent. And the recent track record for Democrats in special elections last year, both for House seats and state legislative seats, is also consistent with a generic ballot lead in the low teens, based on how much vote shares have swung since previous elections. So, you might be wondering, which Republicans are most likely to lose? There isn’t a lot of information, unfortunately, that tells us much about individual races. There are a handful of recent Public Policy Polling polls of key races, though many of those polls only test our good friend “Generic Democrat.” (Unlike some previous recent years, there’s no shortage of Democrats willing to challenge GOP incumbents. There’s a lot of uncertainty because of that surplus, in fact; in many races, we simply don’t know yet which of the various talented Democratic candidates will emerge from the primary.) What we can do, though, is turn to the Daily Kos Elections House Vulnerability Index, which combines data from previous elections to assess which seats are in the greatest danger in the next election.

Education Department chooses firm with ties to Betsy DeVos for debt-collection contract

Despite its questionable past ratings, the Education Department awarded a contract to Performant Financial Corp.
Salon: in-depth news, politics, business, technology & culture Salon

Education Department chooses firm with ties to Betsy DeVos for debt-collection contract

Despite its questionable past ratings, the Education Department awarded a contract to Performant Financial Corp.

Oprah, the Alabama Crimson Tide, and how to adjust to change

This year’s NCAA national football championship was won in dramatic fashion by the University of Alabama.  Most remarkable was that the game was actually a tale of two halfs. The first half was dominated by the Georgia Bulldogs, and the second by the Alab
Daily Kos

Oprah, the Alabama Crimson Tide, and how to adjust to change

This year’s NCAA national football championship was won in dramatic fashion by the University of Alabama.  Most remarkable was that the game was actually a tale of two halfs. The first half was dominated by the Georgia Bulldogs, and the second by the Alabama Crimson Tide. Alabama’s coach Nick Saban recognized that they couldn’t win doing what they’d been doing in the first half. At halftime, he brought in freshman quarterback Tua Tagovailoa. Saban felt Tagovailoa would have a better chance given his superior passing game. It was risky, but Saban felt he wasn’t going to win by doing what he’d been doing.  In the software development world, this process of trying something, seeing what happens, and then adjusting accordingly is known as agile development.  What’s agile development got to do with Oprah Winfrey?

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