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Queen Elizabeth 2: Dubai's First Floating Hotel Opens to Public

Britain’s famed Queen Elizabeth 2 cruise ship is finally open to the public as a floating luxury hotel moored off at Mina Rashid in Dubai.Queen Elizabeth 2 also known as QE2 was built by Cunard and put to sea in 1969. The ship has been named after the wife
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Queen Elizabeth 2: Dubai's First Floating Hotel Opens to Public

Britain’s famed Queen Elizabeth 2 cruise ship is finally open to the public as a floating luxury hotel moored off at Mina Rashid in Dubai.Queen Elizabeth 2 also known as QE2 was built by Cunard and put to sea in 1969. The ship has been named after the wife of King George VI, not the current British monarch, hence the number rather than the Roman numeral.The luxury ship traveled some six million miles in decades of service carrying 2.5 million passengers and crossed the Atlantic more than 800 times. Britain expropriated the ship as a troop carrier for the Falklands War against Argentina in 1982. In 1987 the ship won the Queen’s Award for Export Achievement. Cunard sold the QE2 to an arm of the state-run conglomerate Dubai World for 50 million pounds ($100 million) in 2007. In 2015, PCFC Hotels, the Dubai government’s Ports, Customs, and Free Zone Corp. took over the project and reinvented the legendary vessel as the latest must-see tourism destination, in a city renowned for its world-class attractions.The refurbished ship has retained the original porthole windows in the rooms, as well as the interior design features, including the period furniture, renowned paintings, and famous memorabilia. Some of the rooms have a balcony, allowing guests to enjoy views of the marina. Two of the rooms, said to be the “gem in the crown” of the vessel and named after the Queen’s mother and grandmother, offer a private veranda, conservatory, and dining room, aside from a luxurious bedroom. Adjacent to the hotel lobby is the QE2 Exhibition – an interactive museum providing insights into the QE2 from the 60’s when she was a pioneer in design, technology, and lifestyle — words often used to describe the city she resides in today. Around seven of the QE2’s 13 decks are under operation, with 224 cabins available. Prices range from $150 a night in the simplest berthing to $15,000 a night for the Queen Elizabeth and Queen Mary suites. A number of the restaurants have also kept the original names and retained the same décor as the vessel’s former years. The ship also features shops run by Dubai Duty Free, the government-run conglomerate that had $1.93 billion of sales in 2017, with 9.7 million cans of beer and 7.4 million bottles of liquor and wine sold. Even with the major restoration work already completed, the vessel’s features, facilities, and amenities will be unveiled to the public in various phases, with the soft opening slated this Wednesdy.The grand launch will take place in October 2018.For details, visit: https://www.qe2.com/ http://www.blouinartinfo.com/                                            Founder Louise Blouin

The Best of Cologne, As Seen By Fair Director, Daniel Hug

Art Cologne — the Rhineland’s long-standing trade fair for Modern and Contemporary art—boasts 210 galleries from 33 countries for this year’s edition, April 19-22. Launched in 1967 and officially deemed a trade fair since 1984, it was the first t
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The Best of Cologne, As Seen By Fair Director, Daniel Hug

Art Cologne — the Rhineland’s long-standing trade fair for Modern and Contemporary art—boasts 210 galleries from 33 countries for this year’s edition, April 19-22. Launched in 1967 and officially deemed a trade fair since 1984, it was the first to include performance art in its offerings; early on, it established a dedicated sector for young artists as well as for emerging galleries.Overseeing the continued success of the fair for the last decade is Swiss-American Daniel Hug (who just so happens to be the grandson of the famous Hungarian artist László Moholy-Nagy). Hug has previously worked as a curator, consultant, gallerist and selection committee member (notably for the Art Chicago International Art Fair). The polymath revealed his local picks in the German metropolis: his preferred heritage café, a thorough array of local galleries, and the bookshop where you can in fact meet the namesake publisher in person.How long have you been living in Cologne?It’s been 10 years now. The 53rd edition of Art Cologne this April will be my 10th fair in Cologne.What are your “can’t leave without seeing this” recommendations for the city?Of course, there is the Grand Cathedral, which is the hallmark of Cologne. From the top of the Gothic church, visitors have a great view.There are also lots of great art museums, such as the Museum Ludwig which is well known for its extraordinary exhibitions of Contemporary and Modern art. Also, the Kolumba Museum, of the Archdiocese of Cologne. It allows the visitor to experience two millennia of Western culture in a single building.  What is the most overrated thing people advise visitors to check out when they’re in town?The Kölscher Klüngel — Google it.What restaurants and/or cafes would you recommend, and what makes them unique?The most underrated cafe is Cafe Printen-Schmitz, in the center of town in the Breite strasse: great for people-watching. (I’m sitting there right now, and workers from the Buchholz gallery are at the table next to me.)A fantastic restaurant is Pure White in the Antwerpnerstrasse — the best steaks and seafood. In the Maastricher Strasse, a new organic market opened called Markt Halle. They have a great restaurant on the lower level, cooking with ingredients from the food sellers in the upper level. I had an amazing Bretonian fish soup there.What would you do if you had a free morning or afternoon in Cologne?I would go to the Museum Ludwig and get lost in their fantastic collection, or go to Walther König Books, where you can still meet Walther König.Where would you head for the best shopping?In the center of town, the Hohe Strasse, Breite Strasse and the Mittelstrasse have lots of stores. In the Belgian quarter, the Maastricher strasse has great hip restaurants and shops.Where would you recommend people stay when they visit? (i.e. favorite neighborhood, and/or favorite specific hotel/s?)The Excelsior Hotel Ernst is the best hotel and opposite of the Dom. The Qvest hideaway should definitely be cited — it’s a neo-Gothic building located at the center of Cologne, decorated with design icons of the 20th century. The Hotel Chelsea is also a nice place to stay; it was built in the ’80s and offers some great art. What are the best venues to check out the city's art offerings?The Cologne galleries publish a nice monthly gallery guide: www.koelngalerien.deWhat are the best places to buy art?From Michael Werner, Karsten Greve and Heinz Holtmann to important players in the Contemporary market like Daniel Buchholz, Gisela Capitain, Nagel Draxler, Delmes Zander and Thomas Zander.Great photography dealers are Priska Pasquer, Bene Taschen and Julian Sander.And there are great young galleries like Jan Kaps, Clages, Natalia Hug, Drei, Berthold Pott and Martinetz — as well as young international players such as Rob Tufnell from London who just opened a new space and Nino Mier from LA who will open his Salon Mier during Art Cologne. What are the ideal spots to see live music?I saw Franz Ferdinand a few weeks ago at the Palladium. What are your favorite bars to relax in after spending the day at the fair?The bar in the aforementioned Excelsior Hotel Ernst is a nice place to meet friends and enjoy a glass of bubbly.What are you most looking forward to about this newest edition of Art Cologne?We have never been so international, and visitors will see art from all over the world.We also commissioned the young artist Zuzanna Czebatul, who is doing a large-scale floor installation at the south entrance that will look fantastic. We also have some special exhibitions such as FILM COLOGNE, with video art of Southeast Asia, or ZADIK (Central Archive of the International Art Trade) presenting its “Kölnshow,” the art scene of the 1990s.— Art Cologne runs April 19-22http://www.blouinartinfo.comFounder: Louise Blouin

Discovering London with Michael Benson, co-founder, Photo London

Photo London was founded in 2015, swiftly drawing photographers, curators, dealers and the public together to celebrate the medium. The fourth edition of the fair features 108 exhibiting galleries from 18 countries, selected by a curatorial committee led by P
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Discovering London with Michael Benson, co-founder, Photo London

Photo London was founded in 2015, swiftly drawing photographers, curators, dealers and the public together to celebrate the medium. The fourth edition of the fair features 108 exhibiting galleries from 18 countries, selected by a curatorial committee led by Philippe Garner, who oversaw the first photography auction in the UK at Sotheby’s, in 1971.This year, the Discovery section has expanded to include 22 galleries, and the Talks program features speakers including Joel Meyerowitz, Bruce Gilden, An-My Lê, Thomas Struth and Vera Lutter. Edward Burtynsky—whose imagery explores how humans have profoundly influenced global landscapes, notably through his latest five-year project “Anthropocene”—has been selected as the 2018 Master of Photography. Headquartered at Somerset House, on the south side of the Strand, Photo London is on view May 17-20.MICHAEL BENSON, the founding director of the fair alongside Fariba Farshad, has had extensive career crossover between the realms of education and the arts, notably developing the London Institute Gallery’s exhibition program. He is the Director of Prix Pictet (the international photography prize founded in 2008), a board member for the Foundation for the Exhibition of Photography and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts. The London native discussed everything from his favorite barber to the best Chilean seafood to try while in town.How long have you been a Londoner?All my life.What are your “can’t leave without seeing this” recommendations for the city?The Thames—many of the City’s best secrets are hidden in plain sight along the banks of its great river. The parks are London’s green lungs. And of course, the city’s architectural and cultural splendors, from Westminster and St. Paul’s to the Tate Modern and even the Shard.What is the most overrated thing people advise visitors to check out?Almost all of the usual suspects especially Madame Tussauds and Piccadilly Circus.What restaurants and/or cafes would you recommend, and what makes them unique?Two of the city’s best restaurants—Spring and Bryn Williams—are at Somerset House: fine, imaginative cooking in a fabulous location. The Delaunay is theatre land’s Grand European-style brasserie and J Sheekey is one of the best fish restaurants in town. Further afield Chicama (Chilean seafood) and Medlar (Modern French), both in the Kings Road, are brilliantly idiosyncratic places to eat.  What would you do if you had a free morning or afternoon in London?Morning: a visit to one of the city’s many excellent Turkish barbers, followed by a stroll along the river and a walk in one of the great parks. Then books shopping in Tottenham Court Road or lunch in one of the lesser-known riverside pubs, such as the Dove at Hammersmith. Afternoon: a museum or gallery show (almost certainly photography) or a matinee at Regents Park Open Air Theatre in summer or at Sadler’s Wells. And, every other Saturday: Chelsea FC at Stamford Bridge.Where would you head for the best shopping, and what would you buy?Covent Garden for shoes at Oliver Sweeney, Borough Market for food and Kings Road in Chelsea for (almost) everything else. Where would you recommend people stay when they visit?Our partner hotel the Rosewood is one of London’s finest. What are the best venues to check out photography shows in the city?Many of London’s major museums now stage brilliant photography shows, as do the Photographers Gallery and the well-known specialist and Contemporary galleries.What are the best places to buy art?London has an amazing emerging gallery scene, where the many of tomorrow’s stars can be found. What are the ideal spots to see live music?Roundhouse, Jazz Café, O2 arena, Brixton Academy—but also check out Daylight Music at Islington’s Union Chapel. For great outdoor gigs in the summer, Somerset House’s summer season is hard to beat.What are your favorite bars to relax in after spending the day at the fair?At the Radio Bar at ME Hotel just across the road: you can look down on the Fair and out across the Thames to the rest of London.What are you most looking forward to about this newest edition of Photo London?The 2018 edition is set to be the biggest and we look forward to showcasing the very best of the past, present and future of photography. Our Master of Photography Edward Burtynsky, one of the great image makers of our times, leads a strong exhibition program that includes exhibitions of work by Darren Almond, the legacy of Henry Fox Talbot (featuring rare original works alongside those of Contemporary masters), and special installations by Daido Moriyama and acclaimed set designer Es Devlin.— Photo London runs May 17-20 at Somerset House, LondonFor details, visit http://photolondon.orghttp://www.blouinartinfo.comFounder: Louise Blouin p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 18.0px Times} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 17.0px Georgia; color: #d81e00} p.p3 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 32.0px Arial; color: #232323} span.s1 {text-decoration: underline ; font-kerning: none} span.s2 {font-kerning: none}

Discovering London with Michael Benson, Founding Director, Photo London

Photo London was founded in 2015, swiftly drawing photographers, curators, dealers and the public together to celebrate the medium. The fourth edition of the fair features 108 exhibiting galleries from 18 countries, selected by a curatorial committee led by P
Travel

Discovering London with Michael Benson, Founding Director, Photo London

Photo London was founded in 2015, swiftly drawing photographers, curators, dealers and the public together to celebrate the medium. The fourth edition of the fair features 108 exhibiting galleries from 18 countries, selected by a curatorial committee led by Philippe Garner, who oversaw the first photography auction in the UK at Sotheby’s, in 1971.This year, the Discovery section has expanded to include 22 galleries, and the Talks program features speakers including Joel Meyerowitz, Bruce Gilden, An-My Lê, Thomas Struth and Vera Lutter. Edward Burtynsky—whose imagery explores how humans have profoundly influenced global landscapes, notably through his latest five-year project “Anthropocene”—has been selected as the 2018 Master of Photography. Headquartered at Somerset House, on the south side of the Strand, Photo London is on view May 17-20.MICHAEL BENSON, the founding director of the fair alongside Fariba Farshad, has had extensive career crossover between the realms of education and the arts, notably developing the London Institute Gallery’s exhibition program. He is the Director of Prix Pictet (the international photography prize founded in 2008), a board member for the Foundation for the Exhibition of Photography and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts. The London native discussed everything from his favorite barber to the best Chilean seafood to try while in town.How long have you been a Londoner?All my life.What are your “can’t leave without seeing this” recommendations for the city?The Thames—many of the City’s best secrets are hidden in plain sight along the banks of its great river. The parks are London’s green lungs. And of course, the city’s architectural and cultural splendors, from Westminster and St. Paul’s to the Tate Modern and even the Shard.What is the most overrated thing people advise visitors to check out?Almost all of the usual suspects especially Madame Tussauds and Piccadilly Circus.What restaurants and/or cafes would you recommend, and what makes them unique?Two of the city’s best restaurants—Spring and Bryn Williams—are at Somerset House: fine, imaginative cooking in a fabulous location. The Delaunay is theatre land’s Grand European-style brasserie and J Sheekey is one of the best fish restaurants in town. Further afield Chicama (Chilean seafood) and Medlar (Modern French), both in the Kings Road, are brilliantly idiosyncratic places to eat.  What would you do if you had a free morning or afternoon in London?Morning: a visit to one of the city’s many excellent Turkish barbers, followed by a stroll along the river and a walk in one of the great parks. Then books shopping in Tottenham Court Road or lunch in one of the lesser-known riverside pubs, such as the Dove at Hammersmith. Afternoon: a museum or gallery show (almost certainly photography) or a matinee at Regents Park Open Air Theatre in summer or at Sadler’s Wells. And, every other Saturday: Chelsea FC at Stamford Bridge.Where would you head for the best shopping, and what would you buy?Covent Garden for shoes at Oliver Sweeney, Borough Market for food and Kings Road in Chelsea for (almost) everything else. Where would you recommend people stay when they visit?Our partner hotel the Rosewood is one of London’s finest. What are the best venues to check out photography shows in the city?Many of London’s major museums now stage brilliant photography shows, as do the Photographers Gallery and the well-known specialist and Contemporary galleries.What are the best places to buy art?London has an amazing emerging gallery scene, where the many of tomorrow’s stars can be found. What are the ideal spots to see live music?Roundhouse, Jazz Café, O2 arena, Brixton Academy—but also check out Daylight Music at Islington’s Union Chapel. For great outdoor gigs in the summer, Somerset House’s summer season is hard to beat.What are your favorite bars to relax in after spending the day at the fair?At the Radio Bar at ME Hotel just across the road: you can look down on the Fair and out across the Thames to the rest of London.What are you most looking forward to about this newest edition of Photo London?The 2018 edition is set to be the biggest and we look forward to showcasing the very best of the past, present and future of photography. Our Master of Photography Edward Burtynsky, one of the great image makers of our times, leads a strong exhibition program that includes exhibitions of work by Darren Almond, the legacy of Henry Fox Talbot (featuring rare original works alongside those of Contemporary masters), and special installations by Daido Moriyama and acclaimed set designer Es Devlin.— Photo London runs May 17-20 at Somerset House, LondonFor details, visit http://photolondon.orghttp://www.blouinartinfo.comFounder: Louise Blouin p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 18.0px Times} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 17.0px Georgia; color: #d81e00} p.p3 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 32.0px Arial; color: #232323} span.s1 {text-decoration: underline ; font-kerning: none} span.s2 {font-kerning: none}

Top Attractions in New York by Gallerist Laurence Miller, Exhibiting at AIPAD

The 38th edition of AIPAD, one of the most notable annual international photography fairs, is currently running at Pier 94 in New York City April 5-8. More than 100 of the world’s leading photography —specialized galleries will present Contemporary, Moder
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Top Attractions in New York by Gallerist Laurence Miller, Exhibiting at AIPAD

The 38th edition of AIPAD, one of the most notable annual international photography fairs, is currently running at Pier 94 in New York City April 5-8. More than 100 of the world’s leading photography —specialized galleries will present Contemporary, Modern, and 19th-century images, as well as video and new media. Organized by the Association of International Photography Art Dealers (AIPAD), the 2018 fair has added more than 25 new participants and will feature galleries from nearly 15 countries throughout Europe, the UK, Asia, Canada, and South America. The programmed AIPAD Talks, which bring together prominent curators, collectors, and artists, features panel events with visionaries of the milieu, this year including Teju Cole, Susan Meiselas, and Edward Burtynsky.Laurence Miller, who will be in attendance at AIPAD, has presented over 250 exhibitions of Contemporary and vintage fine art photography at his eponymous space, with his roster spanning Ray K. Metzker to Toshio Shibata to Helen Levitt. A photography landmark since its opening in 1984, this year marked the gallery's 34th anniversary.BLOUIN ARTINFO spoke with Miller about his favorite restaurants and concert venues in New York, and a particular building with an especially provocative marquee.How long have you been a New Yorker?I moved to New York City in 1974, after graduate school, to work at Light Gallery on Madison Avenue.What are the best things to see and experience in New York?The High Line, especially at sunset. As you walk south below 20th Street, there is a wonderful casual outside bar with river views. Proceed down to the Whitney Museum for a dinner outside on the terrace.A boat ride is another great way to see the island: Circle Line, or sailboat ride...What is the most overrated thing people advise visitors to see in New York?The most overrated is Times Square — razzle dazzle, hucksters, tourists — I try to avoid it.  If you like to gawk, head over to Trump Tower.What restaurants and/or cafes would you recommend?Living in Greenwich Village, and with the gallery on West 26th Street, almost all our dining out is between home and work. Advice: find a restaurant that's busy but can seat you.  If you are staying uptown, two excellent restaurants are side by side, across from Carnegie Hall: Trattoria del Arte and Red Eye Grill.Knickerbockers, one block from Washington Square, has great steak and atmosphere. If you plan on spending time in Chelsea, which has the greatest concentration of art galleries in the world, ours included, I suggest lunch or dinner at The Red Cat, Bottino, or Pepe Giallo: all on Tenth Avenue near 23rd Street.What are the best venues for seeing art in New York?Of course, we have many world-class museums... Go as early as you can to avoid the crowds (especially MoMA), and see if your local museum membership is reciprocal.What would you do if you had a free morning or afternoon in New York?When I have free time and the weather is nice, I head over to Chelsea Piers and hit golf balls.What are the ideal places to see live music?For music lovers, there is of course Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center, but downtown is the place to head for jazz and blues. Check out the Village Vanguard, the Blue Note, and the truly intimate Smalls. For hardcore blues, got to Terra Blues on Bleecker Street.What are your favorite bars to relax in after spending the day at the art fair?The Upper West Side is rapidly being developed, and more and more restaurants are opening.  From Pier 94, walk east two blocks to Tenth Avenue: we had a very enjoyable Mediterranean meal at Taboon.What are you most looking forward to about AIPAD?One important theme we are exploring at AIPAD is immigration, featuring recent work by Erica Deeman, Rodrigo Valenzuela, Adal Maldonado.For me, one of the most enjoyable aspects of AIPAD is getting together with international colleagues and clients, whom we do not see often enough. It's also fascinating to see new and historic work from around the world — there are always new enterprising dealers making great discoveries.— Click on the slideshow for New York snapshotsFounder Louise Blouin: http://www.blouinartinfo.com/artists/louise-blouin--2953510

The Best of Paris During PAD, as Seen by Julien Lombrail of Carpenters Workshop Gallery

The 22nd edition of the Paris Art and Design fair, which showcases the 20th- and 21st-century luxury art-and-design wares of both French and international art dealers, takes place at a pop-up venue in the Tuileries Gardens, April 4-8. Since its foundation in
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The Best of Paris During PAD, as Seen by Julien Lombrail of Carpenters Workshop Gallery

The 22nd edition of the Paris Art and Design fair, which showcases the 20th- and 21st-century luxury art-and-design wares of both French and international art dealers, takes place at a pop-up venue in the Tuileries Gardens, April 4-8. Since its foundation in 1997 by Patrick Perrin (a Parisian art dealer with a long familial history in the trade), the fair has been bringing together design aficionados and decorative art collectors. This year’s edition will shine a special spotlight on primitive art.Among the list of PAD participants is Carpenters Workshop Gallery, founded by Julien Lombrail and Loic Le Gaillard, who champion “functional sculptures” and limited-edition works. Their roster of artists and designers includes Atelier van Lieshout, Maarten Baas, Rick Owens, Studio Drift, Humberto and Fernando Campana, Mathieu Lehanneur, Vincenzo De Cotiis, and Ingrid Donat (the latter just happens to be Lombrail’s mother). The duo launched their first space, tellingly housed in a former carpenter’s workshop, in London’s Chelsea neighborhood in 2006. The team opened a space in Paris in 2011, and more recently invested in an 8,000-square-meter atelier in a former foundry in Roissy (northeast of Paris, near the airport), acting as a research and development hub for artists, with an available stable of artisans.BLOUIN ARTINFO interviewed Carpenters Workshop Gallery co-founder Julien Lombrail, who spoke about his favorite locales throughout Paris, his love of the Marais and his skepticism of Montmartre.How long have you been a Parisien?I was raised in a suburb of Paris… I lived in London for five years, and I have now lived in Paris for seven years. I am a solid Parisian.What are your “can’t leave without seeing this” recommendations for Paris?Atelier Brancusi, the docks along the Seine facing the Notre Dame cathedral, and the Italian painting section of the Musée du Louvre.What is the most overrated thing people advise visitors to see here?Montmartre and its supposedly Parisian soul. Looks more like Disneyland to me nowadays.What restaurants and/or cafés would you recommend, and what makes them unique?Table, from chef Bruno Verjus. Bruno is a true artist. When he speaks about a truffle, scallops, even salt or pepper, you can see sparkles in his eyes.Le Derrière, an institution — and my living room, basically. Very special because it is family-driven; the best ambiance in Paris.I love the Marché des Enfants Rouges, where you can have the best crêpe ever at Chez Alain Miam Miam. It’s an institution in the neighborhood.What would you do if you had a free morning or afternoon in Paris?I’d have breakfast at the Café de Flore (still the best place where you can sit between Karl Lagerfeld and Japanese tourists). I’d go to a museum, like to see primitive art at Quai Branly. I’d go with my kids to the Académie de Magie, and then choose an art book at Ofr. bookstore. All this would be on foot, while looking at buildings, monuments, and hidden sculptures.Where would you head for the best shopping, and what would you buy?Rives for tailor-made clothes. The Rick Owens store — still trying to find something that I could actually wear — to buy their art de table pieces, which are like sculptures themselves.Where would you recommend people stay when they visit? i.e. favorite neighborhood, and/or favorite specific hotel?As a neighborhood, I really love Le Marais where I live, work, eat, and shop. Otherwise, Hôtel de Crillon, overseen by artistic director Aline D’Amman.What are the best venues for seeing art in Paris?Museums, museums, and museums.  Musée du Louvre, Musée d’Orsay, Jeu de Paume, Centre Pompidou, Quai Branly. The Fondation Louis Vuitton has some outstanding exhibitions.What are the best places to buy art?Gagosian, Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Galerie Perrotin and Carpenters Workshop Gallery.What are the ideal places to see live music?Le Piaf, without a doubt. It’s the place to be in Paris. I love to eat there, in this early 20th-century brothel decor; it makes me feel like Toulouse Lautrec. There is an amazing piano player who makes everyone sing and dance at some point. Definitely a place to go for serious fun.What are your favorite bars to relax in after spending the day at the art fair?I love Le Progrès on rue de Bretagne. Very bobo; so Parisian.What are you looking forward to about PAD?To meet the best French interior designers.What projects are you currently working on?A secret place for collectors in New York.

Go Local in Hong Kong

This month and the next, collectors are headed to Hong Kong, which is hosting Art Basel, March 29-31, as also some important auctions across genres in April. For those hopping over to the city with the most skyscrapers in the world, here's our pick of how to
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Go Local in Hong Kong

This month and the next, collectors are headed to Hong Kong, which is hosting Art Basel, March 29-31, as also some important auctions across genres in April. For those hopping over to the city with the most skyscrapers in the world, here's our pick of how to live it up like a local in Hong Kong.SEEFor a breath of fresh air, wander down to the water front between Central and Wan Chai to explore Hong Kong Harbor Arts Sculpture Park. Just installed a few weeks back, the temporary outdoor exhibition features 21 sculptures from 19 international and local artists, including Yayoi Kusama of Japan, Zhan Wang of China, Tracey Emin and Antony Gormley of the UK, Jenny Holzer of the US, and local artists Ho Kwun-ting and Kacey Wong Kwok-choi. From a spotted pumpkin to gargantuan feet in charcoal flipflops, each sculpture interfaces with the backdrop of the city in different ways.To see what some local artists are up to, swing by Hong Kong Arts Center, a non-profit, which has supported the city’s Contemporary arts and culture scene since 1977. A dedicated 19-story building in Central with nearly 130,000 square feet of space, the HKAC houses a cinema, theaters, galleries, classrooms, studios, restaurants and office space. With the mission to connect the broader public to the arts, programing includes performing arts, visual arts, films, public art projects, conferences, art festivals and more. The HKAC will have a late-night program on March 30, and the 42nd Hong Kong International Film Festival is ongoing until May 4.If you tire of white exhibition walls, wade through the welcoming darkness of the iconoclastic Empty Gallery, a 4,500-square-foot exhibition space in Tin Wan founded by Stephen Cheng in 2015. The gallery showcases emerging artists working in “ephemeral, time-based, and non-object oriented practices” such as the moving image, sound and performance. Emulating the architecture of a black box, a stroll through Empty Gallery is like walking through a dreamscape of colors, shapes and sounds. The gallery is currently running two exhibitions: “Mother is a Woman” featuring Jes Fan, and “Ruthless Logic” featuring Xavier Cha.DINEHungry, but haven’t had enough art? Eat in the presence of works by Banksy, Damien Hirst, Jeff Koons and Aya Takano at Bibo, a French-cuisine restaurant where art is on the walls and on the plate. With many works on loan from private collectors, these pieces could be in museums if they were not over your head as you munch on pan-seared lobster or roasted pigeon breast with sweetcorn purée and foie gras. The cocktail menu offers vintage spirits, homemade syrups, and recreations of early-century forgotten classics. And the wine menu spans 36 pages — santé!For a taste of some of the best traditional cuisine that Hong Kong has to offer, head to the Cantonese restaurant Lung King Heen in the Four Seasons Hotel with a sweeping view over Victoria Harbour. Chef Chan Yan Tak, a native Hong Konger who has lived here his entire life, holds the distinguished title of being the first chef in the city’s history to receive three Michelin stars. Try the crispy pork rib with osmanthus and pear, siu mai dumplings with lobster and scallop, or roast goose with plum sauce. Lunch time dim sum, ever-popular, should be booked in advance.For a more casual atmosphere, take a seat at one of the longest-standing dim sum establishments in the city, Luk Yu Tea House in Central. Founded in 1933 by Ma Chao Wan and Lee Chi-Nan, and housed in a 160-year-old building decorated with Chinese calligraphy and paintings, this tea house is as traditional as it gets. Artist Angel Otero, who visited Hong Kong for his art exhibit, told a BLOUIN ARTINFO writer, “Luk Yu Tea house has a classical, historical environment, which is a complete contrast with the futuristic feel of the city, and a welcome break from the fast pace of Hong Kong.”SHOPA qipao or tunic suit from Shanghai Tang is undoubtedly a piece of art. Founded by Hong Kong businessman and socialite David Tang, the luxury fashion house combines traditional Shanghainese tailoring with Contemporary design and fabrics, offering new renditions of classic Chinese elements, including cheongsam collars and flower knot buttons. Shanghai Tang also sells luxury homeware, specializing in fine bone china, a type of fine porcelain known for its whiteness and translucency.When it’s late at night, and you need a quiet place to withdraw, browse the shelves of Taiwanese chain mega-book store Eslite. Hard to beat in terms of breadth, the Hong Kong branch in Causeway bay spans three floors and claims to have one million titles on its shelves. The selection is bilingual in English and Chinese, and features a great selection on art, photography and travel. Best of all, it stays open until 10 p.m. most nights and even later on weekends, making it an oasis for quiet reading or shopping when being in one of the most densely-populated cities in the world gets over whelming.For a smaller bookstore with a quirkier personality, try independent bookshop cinema-café Kubrick (yes, named after American director Stanley Kubrick) in Yau Ma Tei. A watering hole for local artists and cinemaphiles, Kubrick sells art and design books, novels, travel books and movie pamphlets and is well-loved by young Hong Kongers. Attached is a small cinema and shop featuring illustration, photography and paintings from local artists. The café is notable for its large selection of floral teas and also serves a full American breakfast.— This article appears in the April 2018 edition of Art+Auction 

“Photo Macau is a celebration of the new way to share and communicate”

All photo aficionados out there, there’s good news as Photo Macau, one of Asia’s newest international fine art fairs dedicated to photography and video, is all set to open its doors, welcoming all art and photo 
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“Photo Macau is a celebration of the new way to share and communicate”

All photo aficionados out there, there’s good news as Photo Macau, one of Asia’s newest international fine art fairs dedicated to photography and video, is all set to open its doors, welcoming all art and photo lovers to Macau. Scheduled to begin from March 24 through March 26, the fair will have the presence of some eminent artists like Jeffrey Shaw, Tamas Waliczky, Tobia Gremmbler, Zhenchen Liu and collectors such as Mario von Kelterborn, Stephan Amling and Steve Hung, to mention a few. Though it’s just the beginning, but with celebrities being around, the fair, surely, has a lot in store for its visitors. To get a feel, Blouinartinfo.com got in touch with Johann Nowak, Fair director, Photo Macau, and an independent curator, to find out the challenges faced by the team behind Photo Macau to make it an event to remember. Edited excerpts: What made you choose Macau as a location for the fair?First and foremost, because of the founder and executive director Cecilia Ho’s enthusiasm and persuasion, we decided to have this fair here in Macau. As a destination, Macau occupies a unique place in the greater delta region where all cities are increasingly interconnected. It is no longer the quiet backwater port but a thriving city which has become a key tourist and cultural hub in the region. We are quite certain that Macau has real potential to become an art destination and we see this as a perfect opportunity.What do you think is the USP of Photo Macau?We feel it’s not only just about a new appealing destination but also our detailed focus on photography, digital image and VR, besides offering the artists working in these fields a truly dedicated platform, which could be seen as some, among many, as our strong points.What’s the objective behind Photo Macau?Needless to say, photography has now become a universal language, one which needs no translation and often surpasses words: you no longer recommend a restaurant to your friends, you simply send a photo of your plate! Isn’t it? There’s no doubt that images do bring people together.We want Photo Macau to be a celebration of this new way to share and communicate. A platform bringing artists from all over the world, exploring the full potential of images whether still or moving, real or virtual. Photo Macau is there to support and promote galleries that pursue the same objectives and help them reach new audiences. In that respect, digitalization represents a powerful opportunity to make artworks accessible to all art lovers.What do you think will draw people from across the globe to this event?  Photo Macau’s first program is a statement of our intent dedicated to a high quality of galleries and artists in an ambitious program of exhibitions, installations and an international symposium. Photo Macau will open its gates this weekend and we look forward to welcome all art and photo lovers in the region to Macau. What were the main challenges you encountered while making this event happen, considering it’s quite a new one in this region?There are some challenges faced in any new venture when there is a minimal record or reference to support your claims. Exhibitors are presented with a lot of opportunities around the world, and every exhibition represents an investment that comes with their share of risks and rewards. Galleries naturally approach a new fair with caution and curiosity, depending on the market, calendar and individual growth. In fact, they also seek comfort from other galleries’ decisions and peer recommendations.   Could you please share a bit about photographers, curators, collectors and art lovers who will eventually be a part of this event?  Frankly, there’ll be many but to name some of the curators, Photo Macau will have Charles Merewether, Joerg Bader, Gregory Lang, Nathalie Shin, Emerson Wang, artists like Jeffrey Shaw, Tamas Waliczky, Tobia Gremmbler, Zhenchen Liu, (among others) and collectors who include Mario von Kelterborn, Stephan Amling and Steve Hung.  As this is one of the newest international fairs, what do you think exhibitors and visitors will actually be able to attain from this event?We are confident that our exhibitors will attract public attention because of the high quality of their works and the curiosity surrounding a new event. We are also confident that the response from the visitors will encourage our partners to support Photo Macau as we continue to develop and expand.Do you think the way Art Basel made Hong Kong visible on the global map, Photo Macau would be able to turn around things for Macau?That, we think, only the future will tell. Art fairs including Art Basel in Hong Kong did not happen overnight, but we do aim to share our appreciation, knowledge and enthusiasm for photography, new media and digital art with the audiences in Macau, Hong Kong and the region. Any future plans for Photo Macau? Our ambition is to make Photo Macau an annual event that will grow as we earn recognition. Possible partnerships with other events in the greater delta region and beyond in China and Asia could be explored in the future.Click on the slideshow for a sneak peek.  

The Best of Macau, Through the Eyes of Photo Macau Founder Cecilia Ho

Macau, also commonly spelled as Macao, is a high-rolling destination — the only place in China where gambling is legal. In 2006, it became the biggest gambling spot in the world — at least in terms of revenue — leaving Las Vegas behind. The former Portu
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The Best of Macau, Through the Eyes of Photo Macau Founder Cecilia Ho

Macau, also commonly spelled as Macao, is a high-rolling destination — the only place in China where gambling is legal. In 2006, it became the biggest gambling spot in the world — at least in terms of revenue — leaving Las Vegas behind. The former Portuguese colony, which neighbors Hong Kong, has a fascinating blend of Asian and Western culture. The enclave is also making strides in the art world, with the Photo Macau art fair, opening March 24-26 at the Venetian Macau, being part of its scene.  Blouinartinfo.com spoke with Cecilia Ho, founder and executive director of Photo Macau, to get her recommendations on how to make the most of a visit to the enclave.   What are your recommendations for must-visit places in Macau and why?One of many things that I would recommend visitors coming to Macau is to go out strolling in Macau’s historic district, collectively known as “The Historic Centre of Macao” as inscribed on the World Heritage List in 2005, and the old town of Taipa. It would surely be worth going for.  What restaurants, bars, and cafes would you recommend in Macau and why?Well, Macau Petisqueira for Portuguese food, Wing Lei for the best dim sum, Passion, a French café, are some of the places that come to my mind where I feel one could really have a great time.Where would you go and what would you do if you had a free morning or afternoon in Macau?Without a doubt, the Macau Museum of Art is one such place where I would love to go anytime.Where would you head to in Macau for the best shopping?Walking the small lanes of Rua dos Ervanarios which is full of vintage and antiques stores will surely help you unwind.Where would you recommend people stay when they visit Macau?The Parisian Hotel in Cotai is one of many hotels that visitors could choose to stay once here in Macau.    Which are the best places to see and buy art in Macau?Come visit Photo Macau Art Fair opening this weekend!What about the best places to see live bands or musicians in Macau and why?Macau Soul is a great place to experience jazz music while having cheese and wine. All this could really help you chill out.Could you please share the best spots for experiencing Macau’s nightlife after spending the day at an art fair?Rua da Cunha, located right in the heart of old town of Taipa, offers good beer and atmosphere.  What other projects are you currently working on?In addition to Photo Macau, I’m also working on “China & Portuguese Art Exchange 2019,” and “Focus Istanbul.”What are some interesting works that we can look forward to at Macau? At Photo Macau - Global Photography and Digital Art fair, I’m particularly excited about the Horst P Horst photography exhibition and the video installation ‘Confucian Rites’ by New Media Artist, Jeffrey Shaw. That’s not all, there’s a lot for visitors and photo aficionados at the fair which will open on March 24 and will continue till March 26. Click on the slideshow for a sneak peek. 

Top Attractions in Dubai by Art Dubai’s Director, Myrna Ayad

Art Dubai heightens its flourishing scene amidst the urban desert: This 12th edition presents 105 galleries — 28 of whom are first-time exhibitors, including participants from Iceland, Ethiopia and Kazakhstan — coming from 48 countries altogether. In addi
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Top Attractions in Dubai by Art Dubai’s Director, Myrna Ayad

Art Dubai heightens its flourishing scene amidst the urban desert: This 12th edition presents 105 galleries — 28 of whom are first-time exhibitors, including participants from Iceland, Ethiopia and Kazakhstan — coming from 48 countries altogether. In addition to the respective Modern and Contemporary showcases, the fair also features various talks (from the heritage influences on Iraq’s Baghdad Group For Modern Art to a panel about the development and influence of Artificial Intelligence); there is also the 10th edition of the Abraaj Group Art Prize (headed up by curator and collector Dana Farouki), and the launch of Residents, a new residency program for artists to create locally-inspired work during their time in the United Arab Emirates.Art Dubai is directed by Myrna Ayad, a Beirut-born arts writer, editor and consultant who has been based in the United Arab Emirates for more than three decades. One of the region’s foremost cultural commentators, she has contributed to various international media, written books on major collections and art movements in the Arabian peninsula, and edited Canvas, a leading Middle Eastern culture magazine, for eight years.BLOUIN ARTINFO spoke with Ayad about her favorite Dubai go-tos, from the most stunning overlooks to the best quick-delivery digital platform for impulse purchases.How long have you been living in Dubai?Thirty seven years. This is my home.What are your “must-see, can't-leave-without” recommendations?Deira and Khor Dubai are incredibly charming: this is where the pulse of the city can be felt. Take a trip on a traditional abra (dhow), visit Sheikh Saeed House in Shindagha and the Al Fahidi historical neighborhood, which are all relatively close by. You must spend a day at a Dubai beach and have some seafood, and two great restaurants are Sammach and Flooka. On the subject of fish, go the Fish Market — it’s fascinating.  What is the most overrated thing people advise visitors to do?They may be “overrated,” but they are musts all the same: See the incredible view from Burj Khalifa, watch the Dubai Fountain at Dubai Mall, go dune driving in the desert and slide down Wild Wadi.What restaurants and/or cafés would you recommend, and what makes them unique?The Lighthouse at the Dubai Design District is a little over a year old; fantastic music and ambiance aside, it’s got a great bookstore and gift shop, and pretty much everything on the menu is delicious.Teatro is a recognized Dubai institution with delectable cuisine from Asia and its manager, Pat, is a delight.Cabin has recently opened and the venue is super charming with healthy food options in a creative setting. If you had a free morning or afternoon, how would you spend it?With my family, anywhere.Where would you head for the best shopping, and what would you buy?I would recommend browsing international Dubai-bred online platform themodist.com, which has an incredible variety of clothes and accessories on offer, and delivers in record time.Where would you recommend people stay when they visit, i.e. favorite neighborhood, and/or favorite specific hotel?Anywhere with a sea view.What are the best venues for seeing—and buying—art?Art Dubai to see and buy art!If you’re not in Dubai in March, visit the industrial area of Al Quoz, which is home to a majority of Dubai’s galleries.What are the ideal spots to see live music or performance?I love Q’s at Palazzo Versace, and the Blue Bar at Novotel.What are your favorite places to relax after spending the day at the art fair?The trademark finale is Mina A’Salam’s Bahri Bar. What are you especially looking forward to about Art Dubai?So many things. In no particular order: seeing the artworks in real life (after being viewed as JPEGs), watching the performances at The Room, attending the sessions at the Modern Symposium, visiting the museum-quality show “That Feverish Leap into the Fierceness of Life,” [a curated show presenting works from modernist art groups from five Arab cities] learning more about automation at the Global Art Forum’s “I am not a Robot” and, lastly, seeing the Art Dubai team feel happy about what we’ve all achieved after our hard work. What projects are you currently working on?Believe it or not, but I’m working on the next edition of Art Dubai in addition to the current one. I’m also working on a travel schedule for 2018-2019 that will take me to the Middle East, North Africa, South Asia and parts of Europe.— Click on the slideshow for a sneak peek at Dubai's attractions.  

Top 5 Restaurants in Madrid: A Guide for ARCO Visitors and More

The Spanish capital has long been a huge destination for culture, not just because of its Museo Nacional del Prado, better known as the Prado, or annual events such as ARCO which takes place between February 21 and 25 this year.At any time of year, there are
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Top 5 Restaurants in Madrid: A Guide for ARCO Visitors and More

The Spanish capital has long been a huge destination for culture, not just because of its Museo Nacional del Prado, better known as the Prado, or annual events such as ARCO which takes place between February 21 and 25 this year.At any time of year, there are many good restaurants, sometimes underrated but which offer a combination of spectacular international cuisine and also local delicacies. In the overall scheme of things, Madrid is sometimes overlooked in terms of other culinary destinations throughout Spain, but it has much to offer. It is a good idea to get off the beaten track and look for hidden restaurants with the most authentic cuisine which may be less popular for the tourists but havens for locals.In this short guide here are a few of the best, both the most obvious and Michelin Star rated as well as a few which are more surprising.When the results came out for the 2018 Michelin Guide to Spain and Portugal on November 27 last year, the new three-star restaurants were outside Madrid although it still retains its attractions. One such is Coque, which has now moved to a new location and now earns a second star.1 CoqueCalle del Marqués del Riscal, 11, 28010 Madrid, SpainDining at this restaurant is a movable feast, quite literally. Guests might start with a welcoming cocktail at the bar and then be moved into the wine cellar for more appetizers and into the kitchen before arriving at their table for the main courses. Alongside the appetizers and amuse-bouches there are many other sterling features. While this is not a cheap restaurant, it is potentially good value with the amount of excellent quality food on offer. It is possibly not a venue to come back to regularly, having had the tapas tour at that the outset once. It is certainly it is worth a one-off blowout.2 Casa MariaPlaza Mayor 23, 28012 Madrid, SpainWe are not exactly off the beaten track here and there is a case for just sitting outside and watching the activity in the busy Plaza Mayor. Again expect to find plenty of tapas, but this is top notch with the salmon salad and grilled vegetables as good as you’ll get anywhere in Spain.3 Casa MariaPlaza Mayor 23, 28012 Madrid, SpainThere is an innovative international menu on offer in this hotel restaurant setting. Hotel restaurants aren’t always a huge success, but this is helped by its friendly staff and converted stable setting.4 Diver XOCalle de Padre Damian, 23, 28036 Madrid, SpainThis place has been lauded with three Michelin stars and is known for its culinary surprises such as the strawberry gazpacho soup. That’s the good news. The bad news is that reservations are not easy to get, so don’t expect to simply walk in and get a table. It is worth the wait, so ARCO goers may choose to be making their reservations for this time next year. You are unlikely to be disappointed.5 Mercado San AntonAugusto Figueroa, 24, 28004 Madrid, SpainLocal dining at its best. Head for Chueca, one of the coolest areas of the city, and eat like the locals do. This place is known for its tapas from every area of Spain, or if you want to get international, it has won awards for having the best burgers in town.   

Three art galleries to visit in Palm Beach for an art lover

Palm Beach may better be known for its long stretch of coast and opulent mansions, but the region has also become increasingly recognized as a thriving arts destination where some well-known museums sit alongside an abundance of boutique galleries. Here
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Three art galleries to visit in Palm Beach for an art lover

Palm Beach may better be known for its long stretch of coast and opulent mansions, but the region has also become increasingly recognized as a thriving arts destination where some well-known museums sit alongside an abundance of boutique galleries. Here, we take a look at where to find the best Palm Beach art galleries.1. Visit the Box GalleryThe Box Gallery is one of the top fine art galleries in Palm Beach, Florida, providing a wide collection of modern + contemporary works by leading artists. As the Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary returns to Palm Beach, surprises await collectors and art patrons visiting West Palm Beach. The Box Gallery will be presenting the monumental “Ars Musae: The Odyssey Frieze” by Marzia Ellero Ransom on January 13, 2018.2. Visit The Society of the Four ArtsThe Society of the Four Arts was founded in 1936 to offer quality cultural programming to the growing resort community of Palm Beach. The Esther B. O’Keeffe Gallery Building, designed by famed architect Addison Mizner, is home to a gallery that features a diverse and ever-changing schedule of traveling art exhibitions. The building also includes a 700-seat auditorium with top-of-the-line sound and lighting for concerts, lectures, and films.3. Visit Nicole Henry Fine ArtNicole Henry Fine Art is a West Palm Beach gallery specializing in emerging art markets including Cuban and Street Art to secondary works from Pre-Columbian, Old Masters, Impressionists, Modern, Contemporary, Latin American, European, and American Art. The gallery was founded by art dealer Nicole Henry in 2006. After graduating from Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, with a BFA in Art History and Studio Art, Nicole Henry was granted a treasury license from the U.S. government in 2001 to travel to Cuba and bring back Cuban Art. Nicole has raised over $1,250,000 for local charities over the past three years, and is an active member of the local community and involved with the organization — Place of Hope. She co-chaired their gala in 2013, was the honorary co-chair in 2014 and now sits on the business board for the organization.Click on the slideshow for a sneak peek at the galleries.  

Three art galleries to visit in Palm Beach for an art lover

Palm Beach may better be known for its long stretch of coast and opulent mansions, but the region has also become increasingly recognized as a thriving arts destination where some well-known museums sit alongside an abundance of boutique galleries. Here
Travel

Three art galleries to visit in Palm Beach for an art lover

Palm Beach may better be known for its long stretch of coast and opulent mansions, but the region has also become increasingly recognized as a thriving arts destination where some well-known museums sit alongside an abundance of boutique galleries. Here, we take a look at where to find the best Palm Beach art galleries.1. Visit the Box GalleryThe Box Gallery is one of the top fine art galleries in Palm Beach, Florida, providing a wide collection of modern + contemporary works by leading artists. As the Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary returns to Palm Beach, surprises await collectors and art patrons visiting West Palm Beach. The Box Gallery will be presenting the monumental “Ars Musae: The Odyssey Frieze” by Marzia Ellero Ransom on January 13, 2018.2. Visit The Society of the Four ArtsThe Society of the Four Arts was founded in 1936 to offer quality cultural programming to the growing resort community of Palm Beach. The Esther B. O’Keeffe Gallery Building, designed by famed architect Addison Mizner, is home to a gallery that features a diverse and ever-changing schedule of traveling art exhibitions. The building also includes a 700-seat auditorium with top-of-the-line sound and lighting for concerts, lectures, and films.3. Visit Nicole Henry Fine ArtNicole Henry Fine Art is a West Palm Beach gallery specializing in emerging art markets including Cuban and Street Art to secondary works from Pre-Columbian, Old Masters, Impressionists, Modern, Contemporary, Latin American, European, and American Art. The gallery was founded by art dealer Nicole Henry in 2006. After graduating from Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, with a BFA in Art History and Studio Art, Nicole Henry was granted a treasury license from the U.S. government in 2001 to travel to Cuba and bring back Cuban Art. Nicole has raised over $1,250,000 for local charities over the past three years, and is an active member of the local community and involved with the organization — Place of Hope. She co-chaired their gala in 2013, was the honorary co-chair in 2014 and now sits on the business board for the organization.Click on the slideshow for a sneak peek at the galleries.  

Top five luxury places to stay in Palm Beach

As the art world descends on Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary Fair, there is a lot more to savor in the host city and live in style. Blouin Culture + Travel curated a list of properties you can opt for a luxurious stay during the art fair.1. Four Seasons Reso
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Top five luxury places to stay in Palm Beach

As the art world descends on Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary Fair, there is a lot more to savor in the host city and live in style. Blouin Culture + Travel curated a list of properties you can opt for a luxurious stay during the art fair.1. Four Seasons Resort, Palm BeachOn an island known for its swaying palm trees and fresh coastal breezes lies a heavenly luxury resort retreat. At the Four Seasons Resort Palm Beach, soak yourself in a chic and classic Florida luxury resort where your every desire for a tropical escape will be met. Nestled in an expansive beach of silken sand, the intimately sized resort presents an oasis of laid-back sophistication amid calm ocean waters. Relish beautiful year-round weather, chic luxury and ever-attentive hotel staff at our luxury resort set on the best beach in Palm Beach.2. The Brazilian Court Palm BeachExtraordinary amenities and privileged service lie at the heart of the guest experience at The Brazilian Court Hotel. Set among tranquil garden courtyards, the Palm Beach hotel seamlessly incorporates all the comforts expected from a luxury retreat. Surrounded by designer chaise lounges and lush palm gardens, the secluded pool is the perfect Palm Beach oasis. Your pampered pet will enjoy a welcome amenity and nightly turndown service. There is a one-time $100 non-refundable pet fee per stay.3. The BreakersFounded on the sands of Palm Beach in 1896, the story of The Breakers has been one of the strong roots ever since. The resort is holding true to its values while evolving in a changing world. The story of The Breakers continues, holding fast to the ideals that put it on the map —unapologetic luxury, seaside glamour, and world-class service at the same time embracing the new. In the modern world that is more interconnected than ever before, The Breakers is committed to the environment and its guests.4. The Chesterfield Palm BeachSurrounded by palm-lined boulevards, the property is just moments from Worth Avenue and white sandy beaches. Experience the world-class hospitality, renowned traditional High Tea, old-world charm, and beautiful, individually designed bedrooms and suites. The interiors of The Chesterfield Palm Beach are as stylish and inspiring as the exterior. Here you have a choice of 42 Superior and Deluxe Rooms and 11 luxurious Suites, all decorated in styles and colors that accentuate the clear warm days and soft nights of Palm Beach.5. Tideline Ocean Resort And SpaA private white-sand beach with breathtaking panoramic Atlantic Ocean views, world-class dining at two on-site restaurants and a spa named one of Florida’s best places to pamper yourself – welcome to paradise at the Tideline Ocean Resort & Spa in Palm Beach. The 134-room upscale boutique hotel is a great spot to soak up the Florida sun and let your worries blow away with the soft, calming ocean breeze. Click on the slideshow for a sneak peek at the properties.  

London’s Very Best Restaurants and Bars: Top Picks by Writer Stephanie Brookes

Everyone has heard of The Savoy. Many London foodies will know Pollen Street Social or Little Social. You can’t ignore them, but there is a lot more to the British capital’s restaurant scene than that.Stephanie Brookes, a food writer and presenter, a BBC
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London’s Very Best Restaurants and Bars: Top Picks by Writer Stephanie Brookes

Everyone has heard of The Savoy. Many London foodies will know Pollen Street Social or Little Social. You can’t ignore them, but there is a lot more to the British capital’s restaurant scene than that.Stephanie Brookes, a food writer and presenter, a BBC London Radio contributor, opens up on some of her choices in this question-and-answer article for Blouin ArtInfo.Her selection ranges from the small but unique Cork & Bottle to some newer local favorites such as Clerkenwell’s Luca. And – if you want to find Redemption – head for Shoreditch… Now read on.Home is where in London?I live in New Cross in South East London.What projects are you currently working on?I’m looking forward to my upcoming compering roles and working on some more broadcast projects. Which are the best restaurants right now – do list a few and say why you like them?Pollen Street Social in Mayfair is a modern British restaurant by Chef Jason Atherton. It has a delectable menu of fresh, seasonal produce with an outstanding three-course set menu – one of the best I’ve tasted.Kiln in Soho is the perfect place if you’re craving delicious, Thai-inspired dishes. I highly recommend the Clay pot noodles with crab. Also, try the Langoustines, Kaffir lime and sweet mint.Luca in Clerkenwell is a new favorite with some of the most delicious, Italian-inspired dishes, and the pasta is just perfection. Try the Conchiglie with pork sausage, tomato, anchovy and mint. I definitely suggest placing an order for the Parmesan fries and Spiced lamb arancini for the table.What place is best for a no-expense-spared/ blowout big meal?The Savoy Grill is a true gem and one of London’s most beloved restaurants. The restaurant itself probably has the most glamorous dining room in the city. Expect wonderful service, a menu of traditional British classics and superb cocktails. It’s the perfect choice for a decadent night out.And, at the other end of the scale, name a few places which offer good value?Café East in Surrey Quays serves authentic Vietnamese dishes in a simple, unpretentious environment. The focus here is solely on the food. It’s always busy but it’s definitely worth the wait for a table. You can get a main dish for less than £10 and you certainly won’t leave hungry. I always order the Bun Ga Nuong, a dish of vermicelli noodles, topped with crispy chicken, herb salad, peanuts and fish sauce.Let’s give away a few secrets. Perhaps a secret place worth discovering?The London Particular is my local café in New Cross and one of my favorite places for a leisurely lunch. The food is fresh, seasonal, with an ever-changing menu. The house-frittata is my go-to item on the menu. The coffee is also outstanding.Any choices for best breakfasts?The Modern Pantry in Clerkenwell has a really relaxed, informal atmosphere – just what you want at breakfast. Their menu is always extensive so you’re going to find many dishes you’ll want to try. I recommend the sugar cured prawn omelet, smoked chili sambal, spring onion and coriander. I also order the pain au chocolat as they’re so good here.Chapters in Blackheath does the best Eggs Benedict I’ve ever had. They place a generous mound of thinly sliced ham on a crisp muffin, then two perfectly oozy poached eggs, and then a creamy yet slightly tangy hollandaise sauce, makes this my ultimate weekend treat.Can you pick a best new trend, a quirky new place for instance?Yes, I’ve noticed the non-alcoholic cocktail scene has really taken off, and for some of the most inventive creations, head to Redemption bar in Shoreditch. It’s a great place to go if you don’t drink or you’re trying to cut down on the alcohol, yet you never once have to compromise on flavor. Try the Espresso Remolacha made with an espresso shot, date syrup, beetroot juice and served over ice.And a best bar generally?American Bar at The Savoy is a classic and truly one of the best bars in London. I always love coming here for the Green Park cocktail which is made with gin, basil, celery bitters and lemon juice. The service is always welcoming, and never stuffy.Choose a best place for a nightcap…The Cork and Bottle in Leicester Square is a great wine bar which I’ve been going to for years. It has a very rustic, romantic atmosphere and it’s the perfect place for a late night drink.Best place for a first date?The Rum Kitchen in Kingly Court just off Carnaby Street is a lively, Caribbean eatery with delicious, Jerk chicken dishes and a great selection of rum cocktails. Its easy-going atmosphere is perfect for a date - you certainly won’t have any of those first-date nerves once you’ve sampled their Zombie Cocktail!Your pick of best hotels?I’ve been visited the Covent Garden Hotel for years and it always has a warm, relaxed atmosphere. Brasserie Max is great for cocktails. They also serve a lovely afternoon tea.As you may have noticed from a couple of my answers, you can tell I’m a big fan of The Savoy. It’s never lost any of its charm even after the recent renovation. I adore both the American Bar and the glamour of the Beaufort. It’s always the perfect place to spend an indulgent afternoon.Must-visit places generally?I have to give a mention to New Cross, where I’ve lived for years. It feels completely like home to me now and it’s my favorite spot in London. It has some of the very best pubs, artisan cafes, and restaurants – definitely worth a visit!Just up the road from New Cross is the green expanse of Blackheath. The area has this very easy-going atmosphere with an abundance of lovely cafes and restaurants.How would you spend a free afternoon?A free afternoon often involves a visit to a local food market. One of my favorites is Brockley Market which is open every Saturday, and is a little wander up the road for me. I would then venture over to my favorite café, The London Particular (as mentioned) for coffee. Any good day for me always involves a wander out to forage for food in some form!Now what about any favorite shops?I love the food hall in Fortnum & Mason as it has the most delicious deli counter, fresh breads and pastries. It also has one of the most extensive gin collections I’ve ever seen. La Fromagerie on Moxon Street is the go-to for the best cheeses in London. Lina Stores on Brewer Street is great for fresh pasta.Your favorite building?I’m always fascinated by St Bride’s Church as the spire is rumored to have been the inspiration for the design of the classic, tiered wedding cake. If you look at the top of the spire it has four beautiful tiers and will instantly bring to mind a traditional, wedding cake. It’s no surprise my favorite building reminds me of food!Let’s think about cultural stuff: name any recent play, film, book, art show you enjoyed?“Twelfth Night” at the National Theatre starring Tamsin Greig. It was perfectly played and Tamsin had everyone in stitches.I recently watched “La La Land” for the first time. It’s one of those films which  had so much hype when it first came out, and I’ve heard so many conflicting reviews, but it was a joyous couple of hours of music, dance and pure escapism – loved it!I’ve just started reading “Eating up Italy: Voyages on a Vespa” by Matthew Fort, which is an exploration of his food journey around Italy. It’s making me want to plan out my next culinary getaway.Great tips, thanks for your time!For further information, please visit Stephanie’s website at www.stephaniebrookes.com and follow @stephbrookesClick on the slideshow below for more images related to this story.

Arles

A mecca for artists and art lovers alike ever since Van Gogh set up house here, this city in the South of France has a history dating back to Roman times and keeps current with an annual photography festival known as Les Rencontres d’Arles. The 46th edition
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Arles

A mecca for artists and art lovers alike ever since Van Gogh set up house here, this city in the South of France has a history dating back to Roman times and keeps current with an annual photography festival known as Les Rencontres d’Arles. The 46th edition, running July 6 through September 20, augments 35 thematic exhibitions with solo shows devoted to such masters as Walker Evans and Stephen Shore.SAM STOURDZEThe director of Les Rencontres d’Arles offers a summer tip list: “Musée Réattu, named for Arles-born painter Jacques Réattu, may be most notable for its holdings of photographs. This first public collection in a French fine art museum played a key role in sparking public interest and establishing the legitimacy of the medium. The Cloître Saint Trophime is worth all the Zen gardens in the world. Photography amateurs will feel the presence of Edouard Baldus, who photographed the beauty of this site as early as the 19th century. You have to climb the stairs to access the rooftop and discover the stone roof. Chez Caro, at the heart of the historical center of Arles, offers Provençal cuisine with a great selection of wines. L’Ouvre Boîte is an atypical place where you can find a large choice of Spanish tapas, drink a glass of wine, and buy select Spanish and French products. And each year, the festival Les Suds, from July 13 through 19, welcomes more than 60 concerts of world music in the heart of the beautiful city.”JULIA DE BIERREThe founder of Galerie Huit, a B&B-cumartist space that will feature six solo shows over the course of the season, shares her favorite local haunts: “The Museum of Antiquities is a wonderfully soothing introduction to Arles. I particularly recommend the Roman boat exhibit, which is accompanied by a short film explaining how the boat was recently rescued from the Rhône after 2,000 years of submersion. For a more contemporary take on Arles, do visit the Anne Clergue Galerie and the new Vincent van Gogh Foundation. This year I’ll be wining and dining at the Grand Hôtel Nord-Pinus’s new pop-up restaurant on the Place du Forum, which is open all summer. Le Gibolin in the rue des Porcelets is always fun too—if you can get a table. Sip digestifs in the late-night bar of the Hôtel Blain, which also serves as the new premises of the Manuel Rivera-Ortiz Foundation. Or try Le Picador, which connects visitors to the more local side of Arles: bulls and tapas!”

Top Five Things to do in Miami Beach

Think Miami Beach in Florida and the first images that might come to mind are of bronzed people lounging on sugar-sand beaches or dancing the night away in ultra-chic clubs. And while you visit the vibrant city to take in Art Basel Miami Beach, explore the pl
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Top Five Things to do in Miami Beach

Think Miami Beach in Florida and the first images that might come to mind are of bronzed people lounging on sugar-sand beaches or dancing the night away in ultra-chic clubs. And while you visit the vibrant city to take in Art Basel Miami Beach, explore the places curated by our editors to make the most of your trip to the art fair.1. Visit the South Pointe ParkThe park has walking paths, food stands, a captivating grassy area and a great 360-degree view of the ocean. It is a park as well as a beach. It is also popular for film crews and photo shoots. Experience South Pointe Park’s contemporary art sculptures, the sight of the cruise ships sailing past, and the clear waters at this beautifully maintained park and beach area.2. Explore the Art Deco Historic DistrictThe Art Deco Historic District of Miami Beach city has colorful buildings, intricate details, exciting décor elements, and a century-old history that offers a glimpse into an era gone by. It is the first neighborhood of the 20th-century to be recognized by the National Register of Historic Places. The district has over 800 buildings and structures built between 1923 and 1943 and is located on Miami Beach between 5th Street and 23rd Street.3. Visit the Miami Beach Botanical GardenSpread over 2.6 acres of urban greenspace in Miami Beach, the Miami Beach Botanical Garden was founded in 1962. Its first transformation happened in 2011 with a landscape renovation designed by the renowned South Florida landscape architect Raymond Jungles. The new landscape showcases indigenous Florida plants and trees including bromeliads, cycad, orchids, palms, and many others. There is also a Japanese garden, native garden and bio-swale, and water gardens including fountains, ponds, and a wetland with mangrove and pond apple trees.4. Visit the Bass Museum of ArtLocated in Miami Beach, the Bass Museum of Art hosts contemporary exhibitions all-year-round. Inaugurated in 1963 when the City of Miami Beach accepted a collection of Baroque and Renaissance works of art from collectors John and Johanna Bass, it opened its doors one year later as the Bass Museum of Art, designed in 1930 by Russell Pancoast. In June 2015, the museum began an internal expansion working again with iconic architect Arata Isozaki as the design consultant and David Gauld, also an architect. The new design increased the museum’s space by almost 50 percent within the museum’s existing footprint as well as strengthened the museum’s commitment to the exhibition and educational programming in a responsible and sustainable manner.5. Roam around Lincoln RoadStroll down the Lincoln Road Mall at any time of day to experience the pulse of the city. The city’s mecca of dining, experience, and shopping is continuously bustling with a mix of locals and tourists, which creates an palpable energy. Cafés, bars, and restaurants on the pedestrian-friendly promenade offer prime sidewalk seating, ripe for catching a constant parade of local characters, models, street performers, and more.Click on the slideshow for a sneak peek of Miami Beach. 

Amsterdam: An Artistic Visual Feast

Who wouldn’t want to visit Amsterdam? Known for its “brown cafés,” traditional Dutch pubs where all troubles seem to melt away and great beer flows like water, the capital city of the Netherlands has a warm place in the hearts of myriad tourists. The h
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Amsterdam: An Artistic Visual Feast

Who wouldn’t want to visit Amsterdam? Known for its “brown cafés,” traditional Dutch pubs where all troubles seem to melt away and great beer flows like water, the capital city of the Netherlands has a warm place in the hearts of myriad tourists. The historic Golden Age canals, narrow houses with gabled exteriors, vintage shops and museums are an artist’s delight. And with the Affordable Art Fair Amsterdam in November (it runs from November 1 through 5, 2017), it’s time to start dreaming of a Dutch getaway. American born and raised, Kris Clark came to Amsterdam for art and stayed for love. She joined the Affordable Art Fair team in 2015 just four months before the fair. She firmly believes that good partnerships and programming to accompany the art on show are the keys to a great fair. Blouin ARTINFO spoke to Clark about her favorite places to eat, relax and be inspired in Amsterdam.What are your recommendations for must-visit places in Amsterdam and why?The Willet-Holtyhuysen Museum because it is such a beautiful time capsule, the Van Gogh museum, of course, and I recommend a bike ride along the river.What restaurants, bars, and cafés would you recommend in Amsterdam and why?We love getting lunch from Caldi & Freddi — best Italian sandwiches ever.Where would you go and what would you do if you had a free morning or afternoon in Amsterdam?I’d go to the main library on the waterfront OBA (Openbare Bibliotheek Amsterdam) — I love the building, the area and books. Getting coffee at Café de Pont and just biking along the canals are also things I enjoy.Where would you head to in Amsterdam for the best shopping and what would you buy?Our office is rather conveniently located on the Dam next to the Bijenkorf and close to the Kalverstraat and Nieuwendijk. I’d just go strolling and see what catches my eye. Where would you recommend people stay (hotels etc.) when they visit Amsterdam?Well, one of our hotel partners, of course. Lloyd is a great place with a great concept and fun location, and Vondel Hotels just opened a boutique property right across from the zoo.What are the best places to see and buy art in Amsterdam?Any one of the festival exhibitors! Amsterdam is spoilt for choice with so many galleries.What are the best places to see live bands or musicians in Amsterdam? Paradiso for the great sound and intimate atmosphere.What are the best spots for experiencing the city’s nightlife?I’m a morning person so not big on nightlife. But I have heard there are some great late night jazz cafés near the Leidseplein.What projects are you currently working on/involved in?The Amsterdam fair opens soon so all hands on deck for that!What are some interesting artworks that we can look forward to at Affordable Art Fair Amsterdam?We are super excited to welcome a group of artists from Bulgaria, a collective of young talent from Mumbai and Kollektiv Lumen who make art from photography of your iris. Then there’s Ronen Gallery with works by Daan Oude Elferink, more phenomenal photography art “Artitled” representing Matt Henry and Jeffrey Milstein among others, and of course, exciting paintings at Aperture and Gallery Ter Beek. This article appears in the November 2017 edition of Art+Auction.

Barcelona

Penalva has lived in Barcelona for the past seven years and ranks it among the world’s top places to reside. “The city is the right size to get to know people and the international art scene easily,” she says. Barcelona’s other winning qualities inclu
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Barcelona

Penalva has lived in Barcelona for the past seven years and ranks it among the world’s top places to reside. “The city is the right size to get to know people and the international art scene easily,” she says. Barcelona’s other winning qualities include months of warm weather and a wealth of gastronomic delights. Among Barcelona’s native sons are Joan Miró, Antoni Tàpies, and Antoni Gaudí, whose architecture defines the Spanish city. Whether it is Gaudí’s fantastical Park Güell (Carrer d’Olot, 5; parkguell.cat), with its eye-popping colors and surreal passageways, or his magnum opus, the still unfinished Basílica de la Sagrada Família (Carrer de Mallorca, 401; sagradafamilia.org), the architect’s imprint on the landscape is impossible to miss. The towering basilica, which soars nearly 560 feet, is perhaps the world’s most famous construction site: Ground was broken in 1882, and completion is now set for around 2026. Fiercely proud of its role as the capital of Catalonia, an autonomous community with its own distinct language, Barcelona holds an abundance of cultural institutions. Penalva suggests a visit to the Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya (Palau Nacional, Parc de Montjuïc; museunacional.cat) to view its trove of Catalan visual art. The museum is located on top of Montjuïc hill, affording spectacular vistas.Taking a break from the cultural itinerary, Penalva recommends the contemporary art space and café Cosmo (Carrer Enric Granados, 3; galeriacosmo.com); the cheesecake, she says, is a must. Those craving dinner with a view won’t be disappointed by the bar and restaurant El Cercle (Carrer dels Arcs, 5; elcerclerestaurant.com). Penalva advises making a reservation ahead of time for a table on its outdoor terrace, right above the Reial Cercle Artístic (Carrer dels Arcs, 5; reialcercleartistic.cat), a private fine arts society that houses a permanent exhibition of works by Catalan Salvador Dalí. Next to the Lluís Domènech i Montaner–designed Palau de la Música Catalana concert hall is Le Cucine Mandarosso (Carrer de Verdaguer i Callís, 4; lecucinemandarosso.com), a restaurant known for its authentic Italian fare with a menu that changes daily according to seasonality and freshness. Locals also flock to Bodega La Palma (Carrer de la Palma de Sant Just, 7; bodegalapalma.com), a wine and tapas bar that originally opened as a grocery store in 1935. Another go-to spot is Belvedere (Passatge de Mercader, 3; bcnrestaurantes.com) which, according to Penalva, serves some of the city’s best cocktails. There is also Boadas Cocktails (Carrer dels Tallers, 1; boadascocktails.com), which makes an expert Negroni. Penalva likes it for being “one of the few authentic bars remaining on Las Ramblas,” the historic pedestrian boulevard.

"I love the infinite beauty of Paris": Jennifer Flay

Come October 19, collectors and art lovers from around the world will once again convene in Paris for the latest in contemporary art, thanks to FIAC, the annual International Contemporary Art Fair.“The Lafayette sector this year is particularly exciting, wi
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"I love the infinite beauty of Paris": Jennifer Flay

Come October 19, collectors and art lovers from around the world will once again convene in Paris for the latest in contemporary art, thanks to FIAC, the annual International Contemporary Art Fair.“The Lafayette sector this year is particularly exciting, with 10 galleries from eight countries including Kosovo, Eygpt and India,” said Jennifer Flay, who has been the director of the festival since 2003.Flay, a native of New Zealand, has a long history in the field. Born in 1959 in Auckland, she began her art history studies in New Zealand and pursued her education in France from 1980 thanks to a scholarship from the French government. From 1982 to 1987, she worked in several contemporary art galleries (Galerie Catherine Issert, Daniel Templon ET Ghislaine Hussenot) and took an active part in the participation of these galleries in international fairs in Paris, Basel, Chicago, Madrid, Los Angeles and Amsterdam. During this period, Flay collaborated, notably, with Carl André, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Christian Boltanski, Keith Haring, Richard Serra, Lawrence Weiner and Franz West.In 1990, Flay founded her own gallery in Paris. La Galerie Jennifer Flay (1990-2003) represented in France Claude Closky, John Currin, Willie Doherty, Michel François, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Karen Kilimnik, Sean Landers, Liz Larner, Zoe Leonard, Christian Marclay, Anselm Reyle and Xavier Veilhan.After she was named the artistic director of FIAC in 2003, she formed a partnership with Martin Bethenod from November 2004 to May 2010 to reposition FIAC on the international scene,redevelop the sites of the Grand Palais, the Cour Carrée of the Louvre Museum and the Tuileries Garden in the center of Paris and especially to revitalize the event, which today is recognized as one of the most prestigious of its kind. Since June 2010, Flay has been managing director of FIAC. Following are edited excerpts from her interview with Art+Auction:What are some interesting artworks we can look forward to at FIAC 2017?There are many things that I am particularly looking forward to, for example Henry Taylor’s solo exhibition at Blum and Poe. His paintings, for which the subject matter consists of social and political issues affecting African Americans today, have incredible power and painterly virtuosity. [Also] Corita Kent’s work at Galerie Allen: Her brightly colored, silkscreen text works occupy an important but much overlooked place in the history of Pop art on the West Coast. Orlan and Lea Lublin at Espaivisor will be an interesting juxtaposition of the contextualizing of both artists. Selma Feriani from Tunis will be showing at FIAC for the first time with works by Ismaïl Bahri and Massinissa Selmani respectively from Tunisia and Algeria, and Imanes Farès, also showing for the first time, will present Sammy Baloji from the Democratic Republic of Congo. The year 2017 will also mark the return of a design sector to the Grand Palais with five galleries showing masterpieces of modernist and contemporary design. Oscar Tuazon’s site-specific installation on the Place Vendôme will be exceptional; Richard Nonas will present a large-scale work imagined for the pedestrianized esplanade of the Avenue Winston Churchill; Matt Mullican’s banners from 1986 will be displayed on the façade of the Petit Palais.The Tuileries Gardens, organized in collaboration with the Louvre Museum, will present an exceptional ensemble of 26 sculptural works and installations, together with six architectural projects including modernist houses by Jean Prouvé, a utopian dwelling by Hans-Walter Müller, an artist’s house by Atelier van Lieshout, a Pavillion by the Campana brothers and a nomad and modular museum space by Christian de Portzamparc!Trisha Brown’s performances, held in the context of our Festival “Parades,” will pay homage to work of this great choreographer who passed away this year, while the young choreographer Nicholas Paul of the Paris Opera Ballet will present his piece “A Bras le Corps” for the first time in France and the iconic American poet John Giorno will give a poetry reading in the auditorium of the Louvre Museum.Which is your favorite museum in Paris and why?Impossible to say which is my favorite! No city in the world can boast so many worldclass institutions. The Musée Guimet’s incredible treasures of Asian art, the Musée du Quai Branly and its unparalleled collections of art premiers, the Palais Galliera’s collections of costumes and couture retracing the history of fashion; the Musée de la Vie Romantique and of course the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art at the Centre Pompidou, which will be rehung on the occasion of FIAC. I have a particular affection for museums which are housed in the former homes or studios of artists, such as the Musée Eugène Delacroix or the Musée Gustave Moreau. It is as if the presence of the previous occupants can still be felt.What are your recommendations for must-visit places in Paris and why?All the aforementioned museums, but also the Sainte Chapelle inside the Conciergerie for the deep spirituality it resonates; the gardens of the Musée Eugène Delacroix and the Petit Palais because both are such unsuspected and miraculous little havens of peace and quiet within the hustle and bustle of the city, and the Opera Garnier because the excellence in the field of opera and dance which it embodies is perpetuated each night of the week during the season.What restaurants, bars, and cafés would you recommend in Paris and why?I love Balagan, a restaurant located on the ground floor of the Hôtel Renaissance Paris Vendôme. Modern-day Jerusalem cuisine, with fusion dishes mixing up Jewish, Arabic and Meditteranean traditions. There is also the Racines des Près, a sophisticated new address run by chef Alexandre Navarro (ex-Plaza Athénée, Pré Catelan and Racines 2). Finally, I would recommend Tondo, a great Italian inspired place which opened in the 12th arrondissement a year ago, and where it is always nice to go with friends.Where would you go and what would you do if you had a free morning or afternoon in Paris?There is always something I feel I must see or see again at the Musée du Louvre so a walk in the collections is always a great destination. Very central but still quite preserved, at the very extremity of the Ile de la Cité, is the tiny Square de la Place Dauphine, which is one of my favorite places in Paris. It is a plunge into the Paris of another era with a quaint, almost provincial, feel to it.In fact, it is not unusual to see people playing pétanque. Close by, the Marché des Fleurs is also one of my favorite places. On Saturdays and Sundays, I like the Vanves fleamarket where I invariably find something that stimulates my curiosity.Where would you head to in Paris for the best shopping and what would you buy?To take the pulse in terms of fashion trends, from time to time I like to visit the fashion houses along the Avenue de Montaigne, certainly one of the places where “l’élégance à la française” is best expressed. But on a more regular basis, I enjoy the possibility of “one stop shopping” at the Galeries Lafayette where all the major fashion houses are present, together with interesting and more affordable younger designers and “prêt à porter.” The shopping experience provides a great overview of what is available; an ideal solution for busy schedules.Where would you recommend people stay when they visit Paris?There is an incredible variety of beautiful and charming places to stay in Paris. For a truly unforgettable experience, I can recommend the Hôtel Meurice on the Rue de Rivoli just opposite the Tuileries Gardens. The refined elegance of the“Belle Étoile” suite with a panoramic terrace on the rooftop is pure magic.What are the best places to see and buy art in Paris?Paris offers an exceptional concentration of world-class galleries. Fifty-four out of the 193 participating galleries in FIAC 2017 are Parisian. Concentrated in the sectors of modern and contemporary art, they represent only a small part of the large number of highly reputed venues to be found in the capital. The Gallery Night, to be held on Thursday October 20 during FIAC, is an opportunity to discover around 100 of these.What are the best places to see live bands or musicians in Paris and why?In a classical vein, the new Philharmonie de Paris has an exceptional program of worldclass musicians, ensembles and orchestras with a varied repertoire. The Silencio, a club conceived by David Lynch and inspired by the European salons of previous centuries, has a great line-up in an ambiance conducive to (very) late nights. Last but not least, and in keeping with Paris’ motto fluctuat nec mergitur — and for the memory of those who lost their lives — the Bataclan has reopened with the great program it is known for.What do you love most about Paris?Its resilience and its infinite beauty, both of which never cease to inspire me.This article appears in the October edition of Art+Auction.

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