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A Neighborhood Guide to Three Art Institutions in Chicago

Chicago is a city of neighborhoods. Each street can seem like a microcosm: a surviving corner of the Old World, infused with different cultural traditions. This sense of diversity is further enhanced by Chicago’s architectural history: after the Great Fire
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A Neighborhood Guide to Three Art Institutions in Chicago

Chicago is a city of neighborhoods. Each street can seem like a microcosm: a surviving corner of the Old World, infused with different cultural traditions. This sense of diversity is further enhanced by Chicago’s architectural history: after the Great Fire of 1871, Chicago became a site for architectural experimentation, drawing many famous names, including Frank Lloyd Wright. Those who visited the annual Chicago EXPO in September would have got a taste of the Loop and Navy Pier, two iconic locations that make up Chicago’s beautiful, lakeside skyline. For those prepared to walk around the city, we outline three neighborhood visits centered around art institutions — the Museum of Contemporary Art, the Renaissance Society, and the National Museum of Mexican Art — complete with notable streets to explore, buildings to view, and places to eat and drink.Museum of Contemporary Art ChicagoLocated in River North, just one block from the Water Tower (perhaps the most iconic piece of architecture to survive the Great Fire), the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago (MCA) is one of preeminent US institutions for contemporary art. Among several cutting-edge exhibitions on display this fall is “Picture Fiction,” an inventive exhibition featuring conceptual photography by the Chicago-based artist Kenneth Josephson, runs through December 30. Finally, the MCA brings together two iconic American artists — Alexander Calder and Jeff Koons — for “Heaven and Earth,” running through March 24.Set in the heart of River North, the MCA is surrounded by fine dining options. Highlights include Frontera Grill, Rick Bayless’s original “casual” restaurant, which takes inspiration from Oaxacan street food. Next door is Topolobampo, Bayless’s Michelin-starred restaurant, which features three tasting menus, ornate plating, and an explosion of flavors. In what is arguably the beef capital of America, it’s hard to go wrong with steak, and Bavette’s is among the best upscale steakhouses in Chicago. For lighter fare, try the new Pacific Standard Time which brings California-style dining to River North and offers lighter fare than Chicago’s traditional deep-dish pizza.There are a number of scenic walks nearby where you can enjoy spectacular views of the city. To get away from the downtown bustle, walk north up Dearborn Street to admire beautiful brownstones, or alongside of Lake Michigan: both paths lead to Lincoln Park, where one can enjoy an afternoon at the conservatory or the Lincoln Park Zoo, free of charge. If you want to take a closer look at the lovely riverfront architecture, walk west along the Chicago river or take a river-boat tour. If walking, be sure to stop at the French Market in the West Loop: a perfect stop for indecisive groups, with something delicious for everyone, from poke to Cajun to pastries. Lastly, take a moment to experience the heart of downtown Chicago by walking south along Michigan Avenue and the Magnificent Mile of upscale, luxury stores. Continue across DuSable Bridge and into the Millennium Park, home to several famous public art installations.“The Bean” by Anish Kapoor (originally titled “Cloud Gate,” but renamed by locals) is the most photographed public art installation in Chicago: its reflective, stainless steel surface beautifully warps the city’s skyline and the reflections of people staring into it. Also notable is the undulating BP Bridge, a pedestrian boardwalk designed by Frank Gehry, clad in armored steel plates, that snakes through Grant Park. Meanwhile, the interactiveCrown Fountain, designed by Jaume Plensa, projects videos of the faces of Chicagoans onto towering blocks while water pours out of the blocks at the level of their parted lips.The Renaissance SocietyLocated in the heart of the University of Chicago’s campus, The Renaissance Society, a non-collecting contemporary art museum, was opened by faculty members in 1915. “The Ren,” as it is colloquially known, introduced Chicago to several world-class artists including Alexander Calder, Bruce Naumann, and Jenny Holzer. The current exhibition, “Put to Rights,” is a solo show by Shadi Habib Allah, a Palestinian artist based in New York and Miami, who works in film, sculpture, and installation. The display, showing through November 4, features two new pieces, including the installation “70 Days Behind Inventory,” which uses flooring from a Miami grocery store that, in recent years, has become a site for clandestine exchanges.Few campuses rival the grim beauty of the University of Chicago’s gothic architecture. Modeled after Oxford University, the collegiate buildings, covered in ivy, with ornately carved windows, and roofs the color of red clay, all serve to inspire a scholarly attitude. If you feel so inspired, visitors are allowed into Harper’s library, to enjoy the magisterial quiet as students revise under dim lamps, latticed windows, and a crowning chandelier. Later additions to the campus have a more modernist feel, notably the Regenstein and Mansueto libraries. “The Reg,” as it’s known among students, is a solid fortress of concrete blocks, perfectly suited to Chicago’s harsh winters. Mansueto, next door to the Reg, couldn’t be more different: the sleek glass building is shaped like an egg and looks ready to levitate off the ground and disappear into the heavens at any moment.Before leaving Hyde Park, treat yourself to a creative cocktail at The Promontory, whose inventive menu features hearth cooking — a nod to the longstanding tradition of fire-pit cooking along Lake Michigan and elsewhere in Chicago. For more casual fare, try Salonica, an old Greek diner with a neighborhood feel, which is located on 57th street, near several wonderful bookshops. Any bibliophile must visit the legendary Seminary Co-op near campus and Powell’s, just across the way from Salonica.   The National Museum of Mexican ArtLocated in Pilsen, the National Museum of Mexican Art is a central hub of Latino, Chicano, and Mexican culture. Two powerful temporary exhibitions are currently on show: “Dia de Muertos: A Spiritual Legacy” and “No se olvida! Remembering the Tlatelolco Massacre.”“Dia de Muertos,” which runs through December 9, is an annual tradition for the museum and showcases altars and other Day of the Dead-related artworks by international and Chicago-based artists. This year’s display includes an installation — an “ofrenda” — from the Parkland, Florida, community who lost 17 lives this year through gun violence.The “No se Olvida!” exhibition, which runs through January 20, marks the 50th anniversary of the Tlatelolco Massacre. On October 2, 1968, just 10 days before the opening ceremony for the summer Olympics in Mexico City, Mexican military and police killed around 325 students and civilians and arrested more than 1,300 protestors. The massacre was covered up and denied by officials for decades, taking its place as yet another episode in Latin America’s history of “los desaparecidos” (the disappeared). The exhibition features contemporary works that remember and explore this dark moment.The museum also offers an excellent permanent exhibition, “Nuestras Historias,” which presents a full and rich history of Mexico, as viewed through its artists and aesthetic traditions. Assembled from several different eras, it includes artifacts from Mesoamerica and colonial times, folk art, works relating to nationalist struggles, as well as pieces by contemporary artists tackling issues like U.S.-Mexico border relations.The Pilsen neighborhood is known, foremost, for its tacos: simply walk along 18th Street and you’re bound to encounter a number of restaurants serving up authentic fare. A few crowd favorites include Taqueria El Mezquite, Carnitas Uruapan, and Don Pedro Carnitas — all of which are located on 18th Street. For breakfast dining, Parkview Restaurant Grill is a quaint Mexican diner just blocks from the Museum. Everyone should try the sopa, especially on a chilly day. Otherwise the chilaquiles are tremendous and the agua pepino is perfectly refreshing.If you’re not in the mood for tacos, Osteria Langhe offers fine Italian dining while Dusek’s is renowned for its famous burger, the Juicy Lucy. In the basement below Dusek’s is the Punch House, a lively cocktail bar with plush booths and live DJs. Skylark is an excellent dive bar, adored by locals and frequented by students from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.http://www.blouinartinfo.comFounder: Louise Blouin p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'; color: #d81e00} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'; color: #232323} span.s1 {text-decoration: underline ; font-kerning: none} span.s2 {font-kerning: none} p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'; min-height: 11.0px} span.s1 {vertical-align: 1.5px; letter-spacing: 0.1px}

Maya Allison of NYU Abu Dhabi Art Gallery on Why She Loves This City

Maya Allison is the Founding Director and Chief Curator of the NYU Abu Dhabi Art Gallery. She comes from a curatorial background in academic museums, notably the Rhode Island School of Design and Brown University. In 2017, her NYUAD exhibition “But We Canno
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Maya Allison of NYU Abu Dhabi Art Gallery on Why She Loves This City

Maya Allison is the Founding Director and Chief Curator of the NYU Abu Dhabi Art Gallery. She comes from a curatorial background in academic museums, notably the Rhode Island School of Design and Brown University. In 2017, her NYUAD exhibition “But We Cannot See Them: Tracing a UAE Art Community, 1988-2008,” surveyed avant-garde artists in the United Arab Emirates.The gallery’s current exhibition, “Ways of Seeing,” brings together 41 multidisciplinary works that encourage viewers to revise preconceived notions about the connection between sight and understanding. It includes a projection by James Turrell, an installation by Fred Sandback, photographs by Lateefa bint Maktoum, as well as works by Salvador Dali, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Mona Hatoum, Alicja Kwade, Shana Moulton, Grayson Perry, Cindy Sherman, and Kim Tschang-Yeul. Curated by Sam Bardaouil and Till Fellrath, the exhibition, which previously showed in Istanbul and Brussels, is on view through November 17.Continuing the theme of contrasting what we know with what we think we know, we spoke to Allison about the subtleties of working in a new place and the richly diverse culture that fills the blocks and side streets around the Emirati capital.How long have you been living in Abu Dhabi?Seven years.How has the art scene evolved in the past few years?Very quickly. For many decades, the complex content that artists had been working on was starting to surface, but now there is a wonderful explosion of visibility as more venues open. You oversee the NYUAD Art Gallery, which is currently hosting the exhibition “Ways of Seeing.” In what ways has living in Abu Dhabi changed your ways of seeing — about art or anything else?I like to tell the story of my arrival as a kind of reversal: I had been in China and moved here, and felt I had moved to a “Western” country. It seemed very familiar initially. It took about two years for me to begin to see and appreciate how much I actually didn’t understand initially — particularly the depth of the complexities and subtleties of the UAE as a unique place with many cultural cross-currents at work.Suddenly, I realized I couldn’t curate the same show here as I would when I was at Brown University or the RISD. Art has an urgency here that it did not there. It matters in a way that I rarely see with the average jaded New Yorker. I find it incredibly exciting — and challenging — to curate in dialogue with so many different cultural influences.Do you have a favorite Emirati artist, whom you think more people should know about?A key thing to know, is that there has been an active avant-garde scene here since the early 1980s, anchored by the late Hassan Sharif — a conceptual and performance artist who mentored several generations. I am now working on a historical overview of the various overlapping art communities that evolved in the UAE in that period — in particular a wave of artists who went abroad for visual arts degrees in the late 1970s, and many of those studied in Cairo. Dr. Najat Makki is one of the best-known examples from that circle.What are your “must-see” recommendations for the city?I take every visitor to walk among the interior blocks of downtown Abu Dhabi, particularly in the areas near Qasr Al Hosn. In between the large wide streets are blocks full of small side streets with a lively urban fabric. Each “super block” has a different character, whether driven by cultural clusters — South Asian, Lebanese, Philippine, Khaleeji — or driven by particular restaurants, such as the incredible, informal “drive-through” in front of the Lebanese Flower restaurant in the Khalidiya area. The people-watching and delicious food to be found in these inner blocks is not to be missed.Go see art at the Louvre, but also at Warehouse 421, at Manarat, at the Art House Cafe, and at our local university Art Gallery (which is, actually, a non-collecting museum). Have a gold-dusted cappuccino at the Palace Hotel, but also have a Turkish coffee from a side-street restaurant in one of the downtown blocks.What would be on your agenda, if you had a free morning or afternoon in Abu Dhabi?A leisurely walk on Saadiyat beach. A long stretch reading in the Third Place cafe downtown, or at the Blacksmith’s cafe on our campus (the best locally-roasted coffee around).Which restaurants would you recommend, and what makes them unique?Royal Raj and Sangeetha for their thali meals. Unbelievably delicious. Dai Pai Dong for Chinese dumplings and fancy environs. Nolu’s for the most delicious and unexpected combinations of Afghani and “California” cuisine. Le Beaujolais for old-school international French. That place feels like it’s been here forever, complete with a menu that Julia Child might have designed. And Al Mayass, the Armenian restaurant overlooking the water, in the lovely Sheraton Corniche hotel. It’s where I go for big celebratory dinners.What are the ideal spots to see live music?The Arts Center, also on our campus! It’s programmed by the inimitable Bill Bragin, who relocated here from his role at Lincoln Center. He brings world-class but very cutting edge music and performances from around the globe.Where would you recommend people stay when they visit?Either in the walking district downtown, or you can’t go wrong with any of the lovely fancy hotels.What’s an authentic item you can only buy locally?Karak tea and the Chips Oman sandwich are delicious and considered “local” by many.Do you have a favorite book depicting the region, or an author of any provenance who writes about the region in an especially evocative way?There are a few works of fiction, but none capture the feelings that I get living here and that make me love living here.http://www.blouinartinfo.comFounder: Louise Blouin p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'; color: #d81e00} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'; color: #232323} span.s1 {text-decoration: underline ; font-kerning: none} span.s2 {font-kerning: none} p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'}

Achille Salvagni, a New Participant at PAD London, Explains What he Loves About This City

London, like New York and Paris, is so well-known and so high on the wish list of travelers that it almost seems unlikely you could find something new  about it. Yet, every visitor has his own unique version of London, which makes it worth a fresh discov
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Achille Salvagni, a New Participant at PAD London, Explains What he Loves About This City

London, like New York and Paris, is so well-known and so high on the wish list of travelers that it almost seems unlikely you could find something new  about it. Yet, every visitor has his own unique version of London, which makes it worth a fresh discovery on every visit.With fairs such as the Frieze Masters, Frieze London, PAD London and 1:54 African Contemporary Art Fair, the city is in the middle of an energetic cultural season that also features top annual art auctions, and new exhibitions in almost all big museums and galleries.In order to provide some guidance to arts-oriented visitors, BLOUIN ARTINFO spoke with Achille Salvagni, the Roman-born architect who is known for his award-winning designs for luxury residences and super yachts and who is a new figure at PAD London.In 2002, Salvagni established his architectural and interior design firm Salvagni Architetti, and in 2013, he founded Achille Salvagni Atelier, a studio devoted to the production of his limited edition furniture and lighting. In 2015, he opened the London flagship atelier in Mayfair. Represented by Maison Gerard in New York, Salvagni is a frequent visitor to London and enjoys the unique position of knowing the city both as a local and an outsider. He shares all that he loves about London here.What is the most exciting thing about participating in PAD London? PAD London is one of the major events for collectable design in London during the autumn, participating in it for the first time after only three years of existence in London is a real honor and very challenging. We are looking forward to present our work in Berkeley square and finding a new audience.  When did you first visit London and what has continued to pull you back to the city since then? I came here from a young age and have always been amazed by the energy and really unique status that London has within Europe. It constantly evolves and improves and this is why I chose to open my flagship store here rather than anywhere else. It occupies a unique place in the world and continues to attract a global elite of discerning collectors and thankfully now also boasts some of the best restaurants in the world.What is your favorite time of the year to visit London and why? The autumn in London is a particular time of year where a lot of events happen. The energy of the city is at its peak and the atmosphere then is very unique. The trees turn their beautiful autumnal color and if it’s not raining I love walking the streets under the street lamps once it has turned dark and observing passers by.Given your unique position as a non-resident who knows the city as well as a resident, what do you think is the most defining feature of London? London can be defined as much for its generous mix of cultures as for the discerning taste of its residents. The art, design and fashion scene here is extremely strong and the fact they celebrate all these things with various art, design and fashion weeks is amazing. There is always something to look forward to which is a very nice state of mind to be in.What do you think makes London great and what is the best manifestation of that greatness in the city? I love the history of this great city, and of course we have great history in Rome also. But I think that there is a much larger cultural mix here and seeing all of those cultures rub together, crossover and inspire each other is amazing, it really allows you to believe that anything is possible.Could you recommend some iconic London landmarks — touristy or non-touristy — that one must visit if they are on a short trip? The Royal Academy of Arts, especially as they are now celebrating their 250th  anniversary and opposite to Fortnum and Mason for their quintessentially British take on retail.London is a city rich with cultural heritage. Which is your favorite heritage venue of the city that you want to keep going back to? Westminster Cathedral — it’s not all that old, but it is an amazing piece of architecture and it is filled with a collection of mosaics by numerous different artists of the early 20th -century arts and crafts movement.What museums or galleries you would recommend one must definitely visit in the city, even if short on time? The Victoria and Albert Museum, it has a world-leading program and is really tuned into design which is very refreshing.Where do you like to eat out when in London and what do you like best about the fare served in those restaurants? Any favourite London savory that you recommend visitors must definitely try out? And where? Breakfast at the Wolseley always makes for a great start to the day and my local restaurant, Isabel, is always a pleasure to dine at, the staff is superb and the food is delicious. I am looking forward to trying out Hide when I come over for PAD as I have heard very good things.What would you do if you had a free morning or afternoon in London? I would have a sneak peek at the vintage design shops of Pimlico, visit the auction houses to see what they currently have for sale and tour some of the big gallery shows, particularly if there is some Italian influence to be found.Where would you dash off to for a quick coffee and/ or snack? Chucs on Dover Street, it’s intimate and you immediately feel at home there.What are the best bars in the city to hang out at? Brown’s is one of the most iconic hotels in Mayfair where you can find excellent cocktails in a unique British atmosphere. In the summer I also really enjoy the American Bar at The Stafford, they have a wonderful cobbled mews with tables outside.Could you recommend some streets to hang out at to absorb the city’s night life? I am an early bird but occasionally I would spend my evenings either in Mayfair or in Chelsea. Recently I have had dinner at Helene Darroze at the Connaught, Sketch, Alyn Williams at The Westbury and Mark’s Club. Each one very different but all memorable experiences.What are your favorite theatres to check out new plays and other live performances? The Royal Opera House and the Royal Albert Hall, both institutions within London always have outstanding programs. Do you have a favorite London book? If yes, what do you like best about the way it describes London? The city guide by Louis Vuitton where you have a selection of unknown places divided by neighborhoods. It emphasizes historic places, which are really refreshing.Where in the city would you go to catch up on a book or to catch up with a friend? I would go to Maison Assouline for their selection of books as well as for the Swans Bar they have there. Where would you advise visitors to go shopping? We are a bit spoiled in Mayfair, between the fashion on Bond Street and the wonders of Selfridges and Fortnum and Mason, however, for a truly memorable experience and to find something a little bit extraordinary I always enjoy the Burlington Arcade, especially at Christmas time and of course Savile Row.What’s the best souvenir to take away from London? Memories of a great visit, good meetings and enjoyable meals with friends.Anything unusual or any hidden surprises about London that you have discovered in your trips yourself, something that a guide book does not mention? The Foundling Museum, their art collection is inspiring and their story is wonderful.If you were to have one London photo as a display pic on any device/ social media account, what would it be? For me it would have to be an aerial shot, bird’s eye view of London, showing it’s great breadth and the river Thames snaking through it. Although London is still learning how to use its river effectively, if I was to live here I would definitely want to have a river view, it is mesmerizing and ever-changing which keeps it interesting, like London itself.http://www.blouinartinfo.comFounder: Louise Blouin p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'; color: #d81e00} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'; color: #232323} span.s1 {text-decoration: underline ; font-kerning: none} span.s2 {font-kerning: none} p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'; min-height: 11.0px}

Renger van den Heuvel of viennacontemporary on what makes his adopted city so special

Viennacontemporary is an art fair that is pretty different from the high-speed jazzy acts in New York, London, Paris or Miami. That’s because of the unique character of the city of Vienna that is big and classy yet slow enough for a creative soul to connec
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Renger van den Heuvel of viennacontemporary on what makes his adopted city so special

Viennacontemporary is an art fair that is pretty different from the high-speed jazzy acts in New York, London, Paris or Miami. That’s because of the unique character of the city of Vienna that is big and classy yet slow enough for a creative soul to connect with his inner self.Renger van den Heuvel, Managing Director of the fair, has discovered the wonders of Vienna ever since he moved to this city less than a decade ago, and shares what he likes about the city in this interview with BLOUIN ARTINFO.What are you most looking forward to in the upcoming edition of viennacontemporary?This year, I am especially looking forward to the Special Projects: Focus Armenia and Invisible Museum – a project organized by tranzit.sk and initiated by the artist Oto Hudec. It features his vision of a Roma culture museum. In terms of the process, I like the build-up days when the galleries arrive, install their booths, and hang the art works. You feel how much effort and passion galleries bring in. The mood for the fair is actually set in those days.How has viennacontemporary shaped up since you took over as Managing Director of the fair? Has it shaped up the way you had envisaged?From the beginning, Christina and I focussed on increasing the quality, developing a high level of service for collectors and exhibitors and embedding the fair in the great context of Vienna as a cultural destination. And so far so good. It is a rewarding feeling to receive positive feedback from Viennese galleries, who are now more proud than ever of the fair and embracing its internationality.Do you have anything specific roadmap in mind for viennacontemporary to follow in near future?We keep focussing on our strengths. At the same time the market is changing, it will be tougher for fairs and galleries – we are not immune to that. We have to keep re-inventing the concept. Vienna is in a good position to remain a safe haven for galleries. For young and upcoming galleries especially from Central and Eastern Europe, the fair will remain the first touchpoint with the international market and audiences. On top of that we have to develop new ways of servicing the galleries, not only in these five days of the fair, but also during the year.How does the art scene in Vienna compare to that in other European capitals and what makes it unique? Vienna has this strange mix of being local and international at the same time. There is the grandeur of the past, with art history under our fingertips; at the same it is a very good place to live now, in the present. It depends what you need as an artist: a place where you can easily feel yourself at home and concentrate on your work, or that you need to be living on a stronge pulse, in a hectic surrounding like Moscow, where life is tougher and in itself more challenging.It has been less than 10 years since you moved to Vienna. How comfortable do you feel here and what do you like best about the city? Could you compare it with the city that you originally belong to?I am Dutch and lived most of my life in Amsterdam. It is home because of the language, a ride on your bike along the canals and the presence of long time friends. But Vienna is an easier place to live in. It is wide, clean, transport is great (do not have a car, hardly use my bike), people know how to enjoy life. The thing I deeply miss is the proximity of the sea.What is your favourite time of the year to enjoy the city of Vienna and why? Spring and autumn when the sun simply is brighter. Summer can be easily too hot, and the winter period can be quite gray.Given your recent residence in Vienna, you have an insider’s as well as an outsider’s perspective on the city. In this context, what do you think is the most defining feature of the city?In the end it is its internationality. I see it at the school of our daughter where more than 50% of children are of foreign origin (and it is not an international school). I hear it in the public transport. This is by definition a place where people from different countries, different religions, different cultures live together.In an interview last year, you had mentioned that you felt “Eastern Europe was actually present in Vienna.” Why do think that is the case?The easy answer is: geography. When you look at the map – Vienna is located behind Berlin and Prague. You may not sense Eastern Europe in the first district of the city, but once you pass the Ring and even more the Gurtel (sort of second ring) it is simply there, not just a few shops, but the entire whole streets, the people, the languages, the markets.Could you recommend some iconic Viennese landmarks — touristy or non-touristy — that one must visit if they are on a short trip?Take line D to Nußdorf and walk through the wineries, look back and you have a great view on the city, split by the Danube river. Or go to Baumgartnerhohe where the Otto Wagner hospital is.Vienna is a city rich with cultural heritage. Which is your favourite heritage venue of the city that would definitely want to take your guests to? Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien. It remains overwhelming. And the Otto Wagner hospital is also a location that plays a key role in the work of Thomas Bernhard.Can you recommend some of your favourite restaurants in the city that the visitors must try out? Skopik & Lohn in the 2nd district. Schnitzel or any of the other dishes. Food and service are excellent. I always send visiting friends there.What would you do if you had a free morning or afternoon in Vienna? In summer, I definitely go swimming early mornings in the outside pool of Schonbrunn, including a stroll through the park – before the tourists take over. Or go to my partner in film Paul Krimmer in the 15th district and make film plans.Where would you dash off to for a quick coffee and/ or snack?Around the 1st district center, there are quarters that are almost like villages. I live in the 8th and our office is in the 7th, so I get my coffee either at Espresso, Ulrich, Burggasse 24 or Hornig.Where in the city would you go to catch up on a book or to catch up with a friend?For reading I often take a tram or metro line and go to back and forth. With friends, we go to the places mentioned below or to a Kaffeehaus like Cafe Braunerhof. Most frequented restaurant around the corner is Victus & Millie.What are the best bars in the city to hang out at?Loos Bar, Bonbonniere, Celeste, Elektro Gonner, Die Parfumerie.How would you describe the city’s night life? And where should one go to best enjoy it?That’s a tough one. I lived in Moscow in the 90s and everything after that seems quiet. If it gets late, we end up in the last bar open, often then Futuregarden.What are your favourite theatres to check out new plays and other live performances?Volkstheater, Theater an der Wien, Akademietheater.Do you have a favourite book on Vienna? What is so good about it?An Equal Music by Vikram Seth; it is a classic novel on love and coming of age.You are also a filmmaker. What are you currently working on? And do you have any film in mind where you would like to play on Vienna as a character/ subject? I am finalizing my trilogy on the Dutch cult writer Geerten Meijsing. As for Vienna as a backdrop, I would like to follow some people that get out of the bus, tram or metro at the last stop at the edge of the city, and how they move on into the woods, the hills or the fields. In a city you can hide yourself. But where do they go?Where would you advise visitors to go shopping?Go into the quarters (numbered 2 – 9) just outside the center. There you will find many small shops. And there is much more craftmanship left in Vienna, compared to, for example, in Amsterdam.What are the best places to buy art in Vienna?The Viennese Contemporary art galleries, as you can find most of them in the city center, around Eschenbachgasse and Schleifmuhlgasse.What’s the best souvenir to take away from Vienna? And the best places to buy it?Austrian wine. Much better than I expected when we moved here in 2012. You can buy wine at so called Heurigen at the edge of the city. If traveling with hand luggage only, just do it at the airport.What museums or galleries you would recommend one must definitely visit in the city, even if short on time?Museums Quartier as you can basically choose from classic to Contemporary, and Secession. If I can one mention one gallery it would be Georgl Kargl Fine Arts as a homage to Georg Kargl who unfortunately passed away earlier this year. He and many art dealer colleague in Vienna laid many years ago the foundation of the Contemporary art scene in Vienna as it is today.Anything unusual or any hidden surprises about Vienna that you have discovered yourself, something that a guide book does not mention?Vienna has great inner courts, very often hidden. Slip through the heavy door after someone comes out and the door is not closed yet.If you were to have one Vienna photo as a display pic on any device/ social media account, what would that be?A picture shot from the hill, where Villa Aurora is, in the 19th district. Then you realize this is a huge city.www.blouinartinfo.comFounder: Louise Blouin 

Maike Cruse of art berlin on the appeal of the German capital

The second edition of art berlin boasts an impressive roster of international galleries from 21 countries and a robust schedule of citywide programming, including talks, openings, concerts, and screenings.This year’s art fair will take place September 27-3
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Maike Cruse of art berlin on the appeal of the German capital

The second edition of art berlin boasts an impressive roster of international galleries from 21 countries and a robust schedule of citywide programming, including talks, openings, concerts, and screenings.This year’s art fair will take place September 27-30 at the Tempelhof Airport, which was built in the 1920s, decommissioned in 2008, and has since been repurposed for cultural affairs and, briefly, and emergency refugee camp.Maike Cruse, director of art berlin and Gallery Weekend, shared her enthusiasm for this year’s art berlin, along with her love of the city itself, in an interview with BLOUIN ARTINFO.Are you from Berlin originally? If not, what brought you to the city? No, not from Berlin, but I have been living here since 2000. The arts brought me here —I started an internship at KW [Institute for Contemporary Art].What can visitors expect from this year’s Art Berlin and what are you most excited for? I am really excited to see the fair in our new location the Flughafen Tempelhof. We will use the outside field for sculptures. We have 120 participating galleries as well as two new sections, including “Special Projects” for smaller booths presenting solo and curated shows, and “Salon” presenting an exhibition-like booth including works by 50 galleries.Berlin is a well-known art capital. What other cultural offerings does the city have to offer? Three Operas, several fantastic theaters, the Philharmonie and nightlife!What is unique about Berlin’s art scene compared with other major art capitals like New York or Paris?Berlin is the city of artists and the main city of art production.Are there any dishes from the local cuisine that visitors must try? If so, where should they go to try the best version? Berlin is a truly international city with cooks from all over the world. Try Vietnamese at Kin Dee, delicious Syrian food at Kreuzberger Himmel, French at Petite Royal and German at Diener Tattersaal.What are some of your favorite bars? Viktoria Bar, Lok 6 and Freundschaft.What is the one tourist attraction you would recommend to people visiting Berlin for the first time? The view from Alexander Tower.Do you have a favorite park in the city where you like to spend a quiet afternoon? I live right by Gleisdreieck Park, a great park with many opportunities for sports, kids and having a quiet afternoon. The park [is between] my home and the Potsdamer Strasse area where my office and most of the Berlin galleries are.What is your favorite neighborhood to wander through aimlessly? I have lived here since so many years, but new neighborhoods open up constantly and in every neighborhood something new is to be discovered. One of my favorite areas is the Hansaviertel.www.blouinartinfo.comFounder: Louise Blouin 

The Art of Living in the Windy City

Perched on Navy Pier with views of the Chicago skyline and Lake Michigan, Expo Chicago will welcome exhibitors from 27 countries, its most international edition yet. In addition to the exhibitors, there will also be citywide programs including a daylong sympo
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The Art of Living in the Windy City

Perched on Navy Pier with views of the Chicago skyline and Lake Michigan, Expo Chicago will welcome exhibitors from 27 countries, its most international edition yet. In addition to the exhibitors, there will also be citywide programs including a daylong symposium of talks, curated screenings, an interview marathon in tribute to the beloved Studs Terkel, and more. Expo Chicago will take place September 27-30, but visitors will want to stay longer to explore Chicago’s famous restaurant scene, ethnic neighborhoods, and beautiful parks. We spoke to Tony Karman, president and director of the art fair, for advice on how to best experience the city.Are you from Chicago originally? If not, what drew you to the city?  I was raised in Rock Island, Illinois, but visited Chicago often, as I am proud to have a large Greek immigrant family here. We always took the Rock Island Rocket train in to visit and I knew early on that this was the place that I had to live. I moved to Chicago in 1982 with an open plan, but 36 years later…I am most proud to call this most vibrant, creative, diverse and beautiful international city my home.What can visitors expect from this year’s Art Expo and what are you most excited for?  Honestly, I am excited to see what our 135 galleries from 27 countries and 63 international cities will bring as I am most confident that the work will be provocative, challenging, beautiful and most importantly… worth buying. Our highlight onsite programs are not to be missed — In/Situ curated by Pablo Leon de la Barra, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum curator at large, Latin America; Expo Video curated by Anna Gritz from the KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin and /Dialogues, our day-long series of discussions and provocative discourse with artists, curators, and professionals. Hans Ulrich Obrist’s Creative Chicago — an Interview Marathon will definitely be a stand-out event chronicling individuals who have helped to define Chicago’s creative landscape.What’s unique about Chicago’s art scene compared with other major US cities like New York or Los Angeles? Chicago is a hard-working city with great international teaching institutions and that ethos is reflected by the artists and the artwork being produced here. Leading artists like Theaster Gates, Kerry James Marshall, Jessica Stockholder, Nick Cave, Dawoud Bay, Barbara Kasten and many others are showing work that is intellectually rigorous and determined. Chicago was also the first city in America to host an international art fair (beginning in 1980) and coupling this annual event with our robust gallery scene and numerous art schools and institutions, you can understand why I say that this is one of most deeply creative cities in America.    What other activities would you recommend near Navy Pier?  Strolling our scenic lakefront near Navy Pier is truly magical since the views of the lake and the city never disappoint and you are not far from one of the best shopping districts in the world — The Magnificent Mile on Michigan Avenue.Do you have a favorite bar where visitors could unwind after a long day at the Expo?  Zbar, at the Peninsula and NoMI at the Park Hyatt are favorites but Chicago also has a long list of great dive bars and unique locations like the Smart Bar, Rainbo Club, Skylark, Richard’s Bar and the Matchbox.  Chicago is renowned for its restaurants. What is your favorite neighborhood spot and what’s a hot new restaurant you want to try?  Chicago’s restaurant scene is definitely celebrated and although I do have my favorites like Blackbird and Coco Pazzo, you cannot go wrong with others leading the way like Girl & the Goat, Elske, BLVD, HaiSous, Giant and many, many more.  I travel a great deal but I sincerely love being home so I can add a few more to the list.  Which museums or galleries would you recommend to visitors?  All of them. I have to be a bit politic with this answer but honestly, Chicago’s gallery scene is extraordinary and our institutions unmatched. Plan to visit the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, the Art Institute of Chicago but not to be missed is also the Smart Museum, Renaissance Society, DePaul Art Museum, Block Museum at Northwestern, the Arts Club of Chicago and the Graham Foundation.What is your favorite neighborhood in Chicago and why?  This too is impossible to answer as Chicago is well-known for its wonderful neighborhoods and each has its own identity and is worth exploring. You can’t go wrong getting outside of the downtown area to West Town, West Loop, Pilsen, Wicker Park, Ukrainian Village, Andersonville and Hyde Park.  What is the one tourist site you’d recommend to people visiting Chicago for the first time?  Strolling Navy Pier is a perfect way to connect to our extraordinary Lake Michigan and it is also full of great cultural programming but you cannot miss Millennium Park for “Cloud Gate” by Anish Kapoor, the Crown Fountain by Jaume Plensa and Frank Gehry’s masterpiece pavilion. Buckingham Fountain in Grant Park also never disappoints. I always knew I was in Chicago when I saw that landmark.Do you have a favorite park in the city where you like to spend a quiet afternoon?   All. From the Jackson Park in the South to Grant Park and Lincoln Park in the North and Garfield Park in the West, Chicago lives up to its Latin motto Urbs in Horto or City in a Garden.Each neighborhood in Chicago is rather distinct. What neighborhood would you recommend for an afternoon of aimless walking and window-shopping? For window shopping you can walk from the heart of downtown to the Magnificent Mile and Oak Street, but areas like Wicker Park, Bucktown, West Town and Armitage feature more small stores and boutiques.  Chicago is know for its rich diversity and you can walk through Indian and Pakistani culture on Devon Avenue, visit China in Chinatown, Mexico in Pilsen and Puerto Rico in Humboldt Park. Where would you recommend people stay in Chicago (could be a neighborhood or hotel)?  We have several partner hotels this year and all have unique qualities and offerings to make sure that you have a wonderful stay — The Peninsula Hotel Chicago, Park Hyatt Chicago, The Robey, Ambassador, Virgin Hotels Chicago, Lowes, Ace Hotel Chicago and The W Chicago Lakeshore are great properties.Finally, Cubs or White Sox?   Easy answer, Cubs. But I reserve the right to cheer for the White Sox as I am Chicago proud.http://www.blouinartinfo.comFounder: Louise Blouin p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'; min-height: 11.0px} p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'; color: #d81e00} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'; color: #232323} span.s1 {text-decoration: underline ; font-kerning: none} span.s2 {font-kerning: none}

Emilia van Lynden of Unseen Amsterdam Photography Fair on her Adopted City

Unseen Amsterdam spotlights what’s new in the globalized world of photography — be it a Greek photography collective in the CO-OP sector, an Iranian gallery at the fair, or a Polish publisher in the Book Market area. Heading into its seventh edition (Sept
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Emilia van Lynden of Unseen Amsterdam Photography Fair on her Adopted City

Unseen Amsterdam spotlights what’s new in the globalized world of photography — be it a Greek photography collective in the CO-OP sector, an Iranian gallery at the fair, or a Polish publisher in the Book Market area. Heading into its seventh edition (September 21-23), the fair returns to Westergasfabriek, a former gas-works factory turned creative complex, with a spectrum of Contemporary photographers, independent publishers, panel discussions about the medium’s evolution, and outdoor installations. Unseen’s artistic director, Emilia van Lynden, dispensed advice on where to go in the city. Notably: skirt the pitfalls of gentrification, enjoy the pleasures of a classic “brown cafe.”How long have you been living in Amsterdam?Seven years.What are your “can’t leave without seeing this” recommendations for the city?Amsterdam’s neoclassicism is one of its highlights; it’s full of phenomenal, intricate architectural details. I happen to have studied neoclassicism! I recently bought an architectural map of Amsterdam and went walking through the center to see the highlighted buildings’ ornamentation. People miss these details, because when you’re biking everywhere you have to focus on the road.Also the Royal Palace, built by Jacob van Campen, is phenomenal and right in the center. It’s vast, but people never go inside … Even locals don’t realize you can go inside.What is the most overrated thing people advise visitors to check out when they are in town?The neighborhood called De Pijp… it’s very typical, but so overly gentrified it has lost its atmosphere. I try never to go there. It’s still quite hip, and everyone flocks there for brunches, but it doesn’t reflect the diversity of Amsterdam.Where would you head for the best shopping?I recommend the Oud-West quarter, which is where I live. But a specific boutique I love is Athenaeum Boekhandel, a magazine/book shop. You can spend your whole weekend in there: they have limited edition magazines, books about fashion, fine arts, photography, lifestyle. They’ve got every great publication you would want!What’s an authentic item you could only buy locally?Really good eel, gerookte paling, which is just delicious and comes from the North Sea.And the truffle cheese — also fantastic.Where would you recommend people stay when they visit?Sir Adam Hotel, just across the water from Centraal station. It’s in the A’dam Toren, which was recently built. It’s got a phenomenal panoramic view — for Amsterdam it’s quite tall, at 22 floors. There aren’t any skyscrapers or tall buildings in the city. Otherwise, the Conscious Hotel has just opened in Westerpark near Unseen; that’s really nice.What are the best venues to check out exhibitions or collections in the city?The Royal Palace of Amsterdam, which I mentioned, is also a museum; they showcase architecture from the time of Napoleon. The Museum Van Loon is a 17th-century rich merchant house; they have the Great Masters, but also continued to collect through the centuries. They integrate Contemporary art in quite a traditional setting. They have a wonderful garden and a very typical coach house, where they also host artists in residency.If you walk around Jordaan, it’s the neighborhood where most of the Contemporary art galleries are; they’re almost all on Halsstraat. Foam is fantastic for viewing young practitioners of photography, which is close to Unseen’s mission. Huis Marseille is on same canal; they have a great show on now of portrait photographer Koos Breukel. Of course, the Rijksmuseum museum, which also has a beautiful library.What are the ideal spots to see live music?Paradiso. It’s an old church transformed into a club. They highlight a lot of the arts, performances as well as exhibitions.Do you have a favorite author who writes about Amsterdam in an especially evocative way?Russell Shorto’s “Amsterdam: A History of the World’s Most Liberal City.” It covers lots of different periods and gives you a really good idea of the city.What are your favorite spots to relax in after spending the day at the fair?Near Unseen, I like Cafe Restaurant Amsterdam. It’s not the most original name, but it has great bistro food—seafood, steak tartar—and great service.Further into town, I love Cafe de Wetering; it’s what we call a “brown cafe.” They only take cash, they serve beer or house wine, Dutch cheese and sausage. It’s tiny and super local; there’s a fireplace people sit around in the winter and play boardgames. It’s very cozy.What are you most looking forward to about this latest edition of Unseen?We’re showing over 300 artists, and there are fantastic exhibitions like Futures, a platform that features artists across Europe, from Romania to Spain to Ireland. We’re excited to see and meet the people we’ve engaged with in a digital way. Unseen is a very personal event: it shows the human being behind a body of work. It is special, relative to art events, because it is driven by this: the artists are present.And the Wersterpark, where Unseen is situated, is a really nice area: for families, or for anyone really. It houses our event, but they also put on art shows to fashion shows, food and music festivals. It’s a hub that really brings people together.http://www.blouinartinfo.comFounder: Louise Blouin p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'; color: #d81e00} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'; color: #232323} span.s1 {text-decoration: underline ; font-kerning: none} span.s2 {font-kerning: none} p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'; min-height: 11.0px}

Barry Keldoulis on Enjoying his Hometown During Sydney Contemporary

Barry Keldoulis is building a two-way highway between Australia and the art world. After 15 years abroad between New York and Europe, he returned to his hometown of Sydney and started his own gallery in 2003 and, later, became the director of the Sydney
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Barry Keldoulis on Enjoying his Hometown During Sydney Contemporary

Barry Keldoulis is building a two-way highway between Australia and the art world. After 15 years abroad between New York and Europe, he returned to his hometown of Sydney and started his own gallery in 2003 and, later, became the director of the Sydney Contemporary art fair. From September 13-16, Sydney Contemporary will occupy Carriageworks, an arts hub near the former railyards, and feature more than 300 artists from 30 countries and a full roster of programs — from performances to talks to wining and dining. Keldoulis shared his recommendations on how visitors can best experience a city as unique as Sydney. What made you leave Sydney? And what brought you back? I was young and eager for experiences. A screenwriter friend had fantastic stories of New York in the ’70s, so I headed there, and sort of lucked into a job with the then Commissioner for Cultural Affairs for the City of New York, Henry Geldzahler. He was a great mentor, and I got an amazing education in art. Ten years in New York went by like 10 months. After a few years in Europe, it was the mid-’90s and the beginning of the idea of leading from the edge, and the end of the idea of one or even a few ‘Art Capitals.’ Good work could be made anywhere, and the art scene [in Sydney] was buzzing with a new generation of artists whose work I felt could stand up on the international stage, but with a unique Australian-ness. And then there’s my love of swimming and the ocean — there’s not many places where you can bodysurf crystal-clear ocean waves and then be in the city in 20 minutes.What can visitors expect from this year’s Sydney Contemporary fair and what are you most excited for? Visitors will be able to see new work from over 300 Contemporary artists from more than 30 countries, and excellent work by some modern masters. Installation Contemporary also presents large works that normally are beyond the scale presented in galleries. There’s an abundance of performance art, and Sydney Contemporary is, perhaps unusually, a ‘whole of scene’ affair, with everything from Artist Run Initiatives through young galleries to the Blue Chip, and, indeed, for the first time we have the National Art School participating, so visitors can see how the whole ecosystem of the art world integrates and operates. I’m excited by the whole thing, but also the potential for the fair to help with the internationalization of antipodean art. All of us want to see Australian art taken to the world, but it’s a two way street that needs to be developed. A good example of how an art fair can assist is Yavuz Gallery, one of the better galleries based in Singapore. They have been doing the fair since its inception in 2013, and now exhibit a number of Australian artists, not only in Southeast Asia, but around the globe.Are there any dishes from the local cuisine that visitors must try? If so, where should they go to try the best version?  Sydney is a gastronome’s delight. Not only is there excellent traditional cuisine, but also, in a very multi-cultural environment; there’s joy in experimentation, so it’s a fusion capital. I would recommend trying the “stir-fried glass noodles, caramelized wallaby-tail meat” at Billy Kwong, in Potts Point, a fantastic restaurant run by Kylie Kwong, an Australian of Chinese heritage who works with ingredients from the various aspects of her background and upbringing and Australian native plant and animal life.What are some of your favorite restaurants in Sydney?Longrain does Thai with a slight Aussie twist, Baccomatto Osteria is fantastic Italian, both in Surry Hills, Sean’s Panaroma and the Icebergs Dining Room in Bondi are fantastic mod-Oz, but really there are too many to mention.What other cultural offerings does Sydney have that visitors should take advantage of before or after the art fair?Well, the Sydney Opera House is the obvious one, but a lot of people don’t realize that it has about 8 different venues in the complex, so there’s always something of interest to see. Theater is alive and well here, and there’s the major theater companies (Sydney Theatre Company, Belvoir) but for something off the beaten track try the Hayes or the tiny, experimental Stables, both in Kings Cross.What is the one tourist attraction you’d recommend to people visiting Sydney for the first time? Well, I’ve already mentioned the Opera House. But one must also experience the harbor. Take the Manly ferry, to get a sense of the grandeur of the waterway, but also take some of the ‘inner harbor’ ferries, to Mosman, Cremorne or Neutral Bay, and even perhaps the River Cat, that goes inland 15 miles to Parramatta, the demographic center of this great metropolis. (Check to see if there’s something on at Cockatoo Island, a stop on the way, which often has cultural events happening there. You can ‘glamp’ by the harbor there for about 20 bucks a night!)  And one shouldn’t miss the Bondi to Coogee coastal walk.Do you have a favorite park in the city where you like to spend a quiet afternoon? I love the fact that there’s actually almost untouched native bush in and around the city and harbor, rather than manicured gardens (though there are some beauties of those too). Most of what was land kept for the military is now the Sydney Harbor National Park. Check out the islands in the Harbor, Shark and Clark, or North, South, Middle or Bradley’s Head. And a very special garden has been created by Wendy Whiteley, muse and wife of one of our most significant artists, in Lavender Bay.If one were to take a day trip to a small town or to do some hiking, where would you recommend they go?  The Blue Mountains, just 40 miles west, are a World Heritage listed area, and amazing. Not pointy mountains, but rather a dissected plateau that even stunned Charles Darwin when he visited.Where would you recommend people stay in Sydney (could be a neighborhood or hotel)?  Can I suggest that people stay in more than one place? Perhaps a few days in a hotel by the harbor (Ovolo Woolloomooloo, Pier One Walsh Bay) then in another with more big city vibe like Chippendale (The Old Clare), and then to remind yourself that this is uniquely almost a ‘resort city,’ by the beach (QT Bondi)!http://www.blouinartinfo.comFounder: Louise Blouin p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 17.0px Georgia; color: #d81e00} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; line-height: 15.0px; font: 12.8px Georgia; color: #1155cc} p.p3 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 32.0px Arial; color: #232323; min-height: 37.0px} p.p4 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 32.0px Arial; color: #232323} span.s1 {text-decoration: underline ; font-kerning: none} span.s2 {text-decoration: underline ; font-kerning: none; background-color: #ffffff} span.s3 {font-kerning: none; color: #222222; background-color: #ffffff} span.s4 {font-kerning: none} p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px Times}

Anastasia Karneeva on How to Enjoy Moscow

At the ongoing Cosmoscow International Contemporary Art Fair, the Collector’s Eye program is taking an unusual turn this year in its efforts to help visitors “overcome their fear of missing out,” as described by the fair’s website.“Fomo Sapiens,”
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Anastasia Karneeva on How to Enjoy Moscow

At the ongoing Cosmoscow International Contemporary Art Fair, the Collector’s Eye program is taking an unusual turn this year in its efforts to help visitors “overcome their fear of missing out,” as described by the fair’s website.“Fomo Sapiens,” is a pop-up center that in addition to showing some artistic highlights, provides visitors with some insight on practices such as meditation and mindfulness, because, as the curator of the program, Maria Kramer says, “Such practices are also indispensable in choosing artworks because only a state of complete concentration allows you to make a conscious choice.” The pop-up center is representing works of Russian and international Contemporary artists such as Evgeny Antufiev, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Cyprien Gaillard, Anastasia Potemkina, Alexander Povzner, Richard Prince and Sergey Sapozhnikov. Smart Art, a Moscow-based art consultancy, is behind the program. The organizers, Anastasia Karneeva and Ekaterina Vinokurova of Smart Art, say, “Let art lovers from all over the world know how rapidly collecting is developing in Russia and how diverse the interests of Russian collectors are.”BLOUIN ARTINFO spoke with Anastasia Karneeva about how to best go beyond the fair and enjoy the city of Moscow as well this time of the year. Excerpts:What are you most excited about this edition of Cosmoscow International Contemporary Art Fair?I am excited about meeting new collectors and seeing lots of great art.How long have you been living in Moscow and what do you like best about it?I’ve been living in Moscow my whole life, and I like its vibes, the fact that it’s energetic and cozy at the same time. What is your favorite time of the year to enjoy Moscow and why? The city looks best in winter when it’s white. But June and September are the best months in terms of the weather and the variety of interesting events — most of the openings, great shows and premieres take place during this time. What are the places/venues in Moscow that you would recommend all visitors to not miss, even if they are coming for a short trip?Garage Museum of Contemporary Art and the Gorky Park, where it is located, is a perfect choice for a relaxed walk with some light lunch at the museum’s cafe. I also love the newly restored MMOMA’s space at the Ermolaevsky Lane, and a great walking area around it.What are the best places that serve international cuisine in Moscow for the palate of the global traveler?I’m quite conservative in my food choices, but my top three are: Semifreddo- Mulinazzo, Remy Kitchen Bakery, and Rico.What are the best restaurants serving local cuisine?The best ones are the Cafe Pushkin, Uzbekistan, Mari Vanna, Dr. Zhivago.Where would you dash off to for a quick coffee and/or snack?I’d go for Coffeemania.What are the best bars in Moscow to hang out at after a day at the fair?The best ones are Why Not Wine, Severyane, Pinch.What are the best streets to hang out at to get an idea of the city’s night life?Stoleshnikov Lane and the Patriarch Ponds area are very beautiful in the night.What are the best theaters to check out new plays and other live performances?I’m particularly fond of the Gogol Center, the Theatre of Nations, and the Bolshoi is still on top.Moscow has always been an integral part of the Russian literature. Who, among present-day writers, do you think describes Moscow best in his/her works? Victor Pelevin’s Generation “П” (known in English as “Homo Zapiens”) is a perfect description of the post-Soviet era and Moscow in the Yeltsin years, but at the same time it gives you a great feeling of what’s coming.Any local activity that one must participate in to get the feel like a local?Going to the bath-house would be a perfect choice for that.What are the places a little outside of Moscow that one could check out in a day’s trip?Arkhangelskoye Country Estate is nice with an annual Jazz festival taking place there each summer. It is also rather popular today to go to farms outside Moscow; you can even book a room there to spend a couple of days in the countryside.What would you do if you had a free morning or afternoon in the city?In the morning I’d like to eat something healthy like a cereal cooked with coconut milk and would go to an exhibition.Where in the city would you go to catch up on a book or to catch up with a friend?It would be nice to go to the MMOMA and to the Hermitage Garden nearby.Where would you advise visitors to go shopping? Any place you recommend shopping for ethnic Russian wear?I’d recommend going to the flea market.What’s the best souvenir to take away from Moscow? And what are the best places to buy it?Some caviar bought at the Usachevsky Market would make a nice souvenir.What museums or galleries you would recommend one must definitely visit in the city, even if short on time?I’d recommend going to the Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts and to the new Tretyakov gallery.Any walking trail you would recommend visitors to check out the city and/or the surrounding areas?Gorky Park and the Garage Museum of Contemporary Art.Anything unusual or any hidden surprises about Moscow that guide books do not mention?You’d be surprised how tasty the cuisine is, and how friendly people are, unless you know it already. Do you have any message for the visitors, about something that they should do or not do when in Moscow?You should definitely go and eat some blini with caviar at Dr. Zhivago.http://www.blouinartinfo.comFounder: Louise Blouin p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 17.0px Georgia; color: #d81e00} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; line-height: 15.0px; font: 12.8px Georgia; color: #1155cc} p.p3 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 32.0px Arial; color: #232323; min-height: 37.0px} p.p4 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 32.0px Arial; color: #232323} span.s1 {text-decoration: underline ; font-kerning: none} span.s2 {text-decoration: underline ; font-kerning: none; background-color: #ffffff} span.s3 {font-kerning: none; color: #222222; background-color: #ffffff} span.s4 {font-kerning: none} p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'}

At Home In Paris: The French Capital Through The Eyes Of Franck Millot

Founded in 1995, MAISON&OBJET has provided a macrocosm within which to survey the evolution of the design world. The biannual trade fair brings together thousands of brands that elucidate consumer trends, the market, and the future of design across indust
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At Home In Paris: The French Capital Through The Eyes Of Franck Millot

Founded in 1995, MAISON&OBJET has provided a macrocosm within which to survey the evolution of the design world. The biannual trade fair brings together thousands of brands that elucidate consumer trends, the market, and the future of design across industries. The event draws more than 90,000 visitors a year, both French and international, to Parc des Expositions in Villepinte, just outside of Paris.This fall edition, running from September 7 to 11, is guided by the theme “virtuous” — a means of bringing the ethics of design to the fore, highlighting the impact of quality and fair practices, whether at the level of production, distribution or consumption. Beyond this, the trend forecasting agency Nelly Rodi will be taking over the Inspirations Space and sharing its vision by way of its bookshop curation. An overhaul of the fair’s structure provides a new Objet Hub layout for its seven subcategories, from home linens to fashion accessories. The What’s New? sector spotlights distinctive items, deploying innovative materials and craftsmanship.We spoke with Franck Millot, the director of partnerships and special events at MAISON&OBJET and also director of Paris Design Week (September 6 to 15), about where to purchase the best French crafts outside the fair (and his favorite iconic French lyricist).How long have you been living in Paris?Thirty years.What are your “can’t leave without seeing this” recommendations for the city?If you had just one spot to visit, I would recommend Deyrolle [which sells taxidermy and curiosities]. I’d specifically recommend the exhibition produced by Frederique Morrel in the gallery space.What is the most overrated thing people advise visitors to check out when they’re in town?La Place du Tertre [in Montmartre], a cliche of Paris only devoted to tourists.What restaurants or cafes would you recommend?The restaurant in Le Roch Hotel, which was designed by Sarah Lavoine.Where would you head for the best shopping?Fleux, one of the best concept stores in Paris, or Empreintes, a place dedicated to selling pieces handmade by French craftsmen in their workshops.What’s an authentic item you could only buy locally?Wallpaper custom-made by Bien Fait.Is there a designer whose work really embodies the spirit of contemporary Paris design?Matali Crasset, who is one of the most talented French designers.In what neighborhood would you recommend people stay when they visit?Le Haut Marais, the area just south of Place de la Republique. It’s the perfect place to spend an afternoon: it has galleries, shops, restaurants, museums…What exhibitions would you recommend checking out?Head to Declercq Passementiers for an exceptional installation that mixes lighting and traditional trimmings.Where are the best places to buy art?Gallery S. Bensimon will be presenting a selection of Lebanese artists — Carlo Massoud, Marc Dibeh, Carla Baz, Anastasia Nysten, Caramel Studio and Paola Sakr, selected for the Rising Talents Awards — during Paris Design Week.What is the ideal spot to see live music?Ground Control [a pop-up venue on Rue du Charolais owned by SNCF, the French national railway company].This interview appears in the September issue of BlouinShop and Art+Auction.http://www.blouinartinfo.com/Founder: Louise Blouin

Rediscoveries in Paris with Mathias Ary Jan

Young, energetic, and rigorous, Mathias Ary Jan, President of the Syndicat National des Antiquaires, assumed leadership of what used to be called La Biennale des Antiquaires in 2016. Since then, he has revitalized the art fair by renaming it La Biennale
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Rediscoveries in Paris with Mathias Ary Jan

Young, energetic, and rigorous, Mathias Ary Jan, President of the Syndicat National des Antiquaires, assumed leadership of what used to be called La Biennale des Antiquaires in 2016. Since then, he has revitalized the art fair by renaming it La Biennale Paris, annualizing the event and reorganizing its presentation. The 30th edition of the fair will take place under the glass roof of the magisterial Grand Palais September 8-16, bringing together leading dealers, international exhibitors, and over six millenniums of art. A native of the Paris metropolitan area, Ary Jan recommends in this interview how to best experience the city and this year’s edition of La Biennale Paris. How long have you lived in Paris and what do you like best about the city?I have always lived near Paris, in Parisian suburbs as a child and in the city itself for more than 25 years now. I like to feel the movement and the dynamic of the city, which is less palpable in Paris than in London or New York, but I need the beauty and the cultural wealth of the French capital city.What are you most excited for about this year’s Paris Biennale? As president of the SNA that organizes the Paris Biennale, I am looking forward to discovering the scenery imagined by Jean-Charles de Castelbajac this year. He has the strong artistic gesture of an artist who loves the object but who knows how to magnify it in a contemporary setting: a way of being in the 21 st century. I am also impatient to see the variety of items chosen by our exhibitors to make this event a unique one in the world.In recent years, the Paris Biennale was reported to be struggling. What changes have you introduced to revive the weeklong antique festival? In this 30th edition, one of the things we changed is the scenography: We are keen to highlight each exhibitor, which is why we decided to remove the central aisle. We keep only two aisles, which draws a course, a loop. This obviously has an impact compared with the previous arrangement (with a central aisle and two secondary aisles): we will have about 70 booths.With my team, we have strongly reinforced the conditions of vetting in creating the Artwork Admission Commission co-presided by Frederic Castaing, president of the CNE (Compagnie Nationale des Experts) and Michel Maket, president of the SFEP (Syndicat Francais des Experts Professionnels en OEuvres d’Art et Objets de Collection). This commission is absolutely independent. Through it, I want to give confidence back to visitors and collectors.For those looking to take a break from the Biennale, where might they go for a quiet afternoon? There are many places to find a quiet break in Paris. If the weather is good, go to the Bois de Boulogne and walk around the lake or take a tea in the Parisian palace that offers a surprising patio for a very quiet moment.What’s a favorite bar or restaurant near the Paris Biennale exhibitions where people can unwind? Near the Grand Palais, where the Paris Biennale takes place, there are many restaurants with terraces, and all kinds of restaurants on the Champs Elysees. Personally, I like Japanese food and one of my favorites is Hanawa situated on Rue Bayard.Where would you recommend people stay in Paris? Is there a particular neighborhood or hotel? As I have lived in Paris for a long time, I don’t know the hotels in the city, but there are many charming places to stay. In the Marais, close to Saint Germain des Pres or near the Eiffel Tower — just make your choice regarding your sensitivity. I recently discovered a lovely place for a lunch in the Hotel La Maison Champs Elysees where I particularly appreciated the patio.Do you have a favorite park or outdoor activity in Paris? My favorite park inside the city is the Jardin du Palais Royal. The architecture here is absolutely marvelous and the garden itself is a family environment and at the same time a touristic place.If you had time after the Paris Biennale to leave Paris for a day trip, where would you go? I would go to Yerres and stay to the Caillebotte house and its lovely park.What is your favorite part of the Louvre? I would choose the aile Denon, in the paintings department facing the “Radeau de la Meduse” [“The Raft of Medusa”] by Theodore Gericault.What galleries or museums would you recommend to visitors? To stay in my specialty and the paintings I love, I would recommend the Orsay Museum.What is your favorite neighborhood to walk through aimlessly? When I was a child, I went very often to Versailles and had long walk through the park.This is a wonderful place to have an aimless walk.What is the one tourist trap you think is actually worthwhile?The Eiffel Tower of course!What is unique about this year’s Paris Biennale compared with those in the past? Each edition is unique — the Paris Biennale is a wonderful temporary museum. That’s why it’s so important to visit the Grand Palais at this special moment.More information: https://www.labiennaleparis.comhttp://www.blouinartinfo.comFounder: Louise Blouin p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'} p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 17.0px Georgia; color: #d81e00} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; line-height: 15.0px; font: 12.8px Georgia; color: #1155cc} p.p3 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 32.0px Arial; color: #232323; min-height: 37.0px} p.p4 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 32.0px Arial; color: #232323} span.s1 {text-decoration: underline ; font-kerning: none} span.s2 {text-decoration: underline ; font-kerning: none; background-color: #ffffff} span.s3 {font-kerning: none; color: #222222; background-color: #ffffff} span.s4 {font-kerning: none}

Mexico City Through The Eyes of Zélika Garcia, Founder of Zonamaco Fairs

A rich ancient and colonial history, an equally rich tradition of arts and crafts, world-renowned artists, a sophisticated cuisine that rivals any in the world — Mexico is all of this and much more.The capital, Mexico City, provides the opportunity to take
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Mexico City Through The Eyes of Zélika Garcia, Founder of Zonamaco Fairs

A rich ancient and colonial history, an equally rich tradition of arts and crafts, world-renowned artists, a sophisticated cuisine that rivals any in the world — Mexico is all of this and much more.The capital, Mexico City, provides the opportunity to take in elements of the entire country in one place. It is also the heart of the fine arts in Mexico, and two major art fairs that concluded recently — Zonamaco Salon and Zonamaco Foto — drew in collectors and gallerists from all over the world to the high-altitude city. BLOUIN ARTINFO spoke to Zelika Garcia, founder of the Zonamaco fairs, on how best to enjoy Mexico City.How long have you been living in Mexico City and what do you like best about it?I moved in 2003. I like the location… this city has one of the largest metropolitan areas of the world, which embraces a great variety of activities that are always happening.What is the best time to enjoy Mexico City, one of the most culturally rich cities of the world, so that one not just enjoys the weather but also the city’s rich culture and heritage?The best months are August and February, due to all the activities and exhibitions that our collaborators and partners do during Zonamaco. During the fairs, the city becomes the center of numerous events in many museums and galleries, the city celebrates our art week.What are the places/ venues in Mexico City that you would recommend all visitors to not miss, even if coming for a short trip?Talking about art, Condesa and Roma areas are the main spots in the city, with galleries like PROYECTOS MONCLOVA, Licenciado, Arroniz, Machete, Parque Galeria and OMR; five minutes away, San Miguel Chapultepec is a neighborhood with galleries like kurimanzutto, Enrique Guerrero and Patricia Conde; nearby, you can find the Museo Tamayo, and the Museo de Arte Moderno (MAM). Polanco area also offers great options such as the Museo Jumex with one of Latin America’s best Contemporary art collections.What are the places/ venues one must definitely check out to get an idea of the rich lives of and work produced by some of Mexico’s greatest artists such as Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, David Alfaro Siqueiros to name a few?There are incredible places. For example, the Museo Casa Azul and the Museo Dolores Olmedo have a great collection of Mexican artifacts, where you can learn a bit about Mexican culture, and find some of Frida’s paintings. Nearby you will find the Anahuacalli Museum, a temple-like structure that houses the pre-Hispanic objects that Diego Rivera collected during his lifetime and has a program of incredible Contemporary art exhibitions. I also recommend the Sala de Arte Publico Siqueiros, a small museum located in Polanco area, dedicated to Contemporary artists, with amazing murals by Siqueiros throughout the lobby. Bellas Artes also has the most amazing murals and Anthropology Museum is one of the most beautiful and interesting I have seen. Could you recommend some restaurants or out-of-the-ordinary eating out places in Mexico City where one can taste authentic Mexican food?I like Contramar for great Mexican style seafood, El Bajio is the best real Mexican, Pujol is fancy Mexican and their taco bar is a real culinary experience, as well as Mercado de San Juan!Where would you dash off to for a quick coffee and/ or snack?Oscar Wilde 9, a small place with a few tables and homemade food. The menu changes, so I usually order the special menu of the day.What are the places a little outside of Mexico City that one could check out in a day’s trip?I recommend La Tallera, located in Cuernavaca, nearby Mexico City. It used to be Siqueiros’ workshop and now it’s a great Contemporary museum, with awesome murals by the iconic artist. Museo Amparo in Puebla is also a great option, of course the Teotihuacan pyramids.Where in the city would you go to catch up on a book or to catch up with a friend?I love Cafebreria El Pendulo in Polanco. If you want to read a book, that’s the best place to visit.Where would you advise visitors to go shopping?Onora, an incredible store in Polanco, where you can find artisanal Mexican homeware products.What’s the best souvenir to take away from Mexico City? And what are the best places to buy it?Pottery and handmade textiles! You can find great options at the Plaza de la Ciudadela, located nearby downtown area.What’s the best place to buy art in Mexico City?Zonamaco!Anything unusual or any hidden surprises about Mexico that guide books do not mention?I love the La Lagunilla Sunday market (located in a neighborhood called La Lagunilla). It is a great place to explore and purchase antiques, art, collectibles and curiosities. Salon San Luis is a great bar for drinks where you can dance to live music all night and there are “ficheras” — women who will kindly dance with you.http://www.blouinartinfo.comFounder: Louise Blouin p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'; color: #d81e00} p.p3 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'; color: #232323} span.s1 {text-decoration: underline ; font-kerning: none} span.s2 {font-kerning: none}

DAC Copenhagen’s Jen Masengarb on City’s Built Heritage

“A Walk Through Time,” a new Copenhagen walking tour that celebrates 350 years of Danish design and architecture, gives visitors an inspiring lesson on the city’s architectural history from the 17th century onward. Visitors meet at BLOX, a modern fortre
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DAC Copenhagen’s Jen Masengarb on City’s Built Heritage

“A Walk Through Time,” a new Copenhagen walking tour that celebrates 350 years of Danish design and architecture, gives visitors an inspiring lesson on the city’s architectural history from the 17th century onward. Visitors meet at BLOX, a modern fortress of geometric glass asymmetrically stacked along Copenhagen’s waterfront that the sponsor of the tour, the Danish Architecture Center (DAC), calls home. In a recent interview with BLOUIN ARTINFO, Jen Masengarb, a senior project manager for DAC, discussed the curatorial decisions that went into this ambitious tour, her favorite landmarks, and other cultural experiences that Copenhagen has to offer.Can you give us an overview of what the tour, “A Walk Through Time,” consists of? “A Walk Through Time: Explore Copenhagen’s Architecture” was designed especially with the international visitor in mind and provides a perfect introduction for understanding the city.In the 75-minute daily tour we explore how Denmark has both imported and exported design across the last five centuries. Among other stops, we visit the brightly colored buildings of 17th-century Nyhavn (New Harbor), elegant mid-20th century designs by Arne Jacobson and other Danish modernists, and the city’s newest 21st-century landmark — BLOX— home of Danish Architecture Center.Three and a half centuries is a huge time span to cover. What was the selection process like when choosing what to feature in this architectural tour? We had long, spirited debates in choosing the buildings among our guides! But we also wanted to keep the tour to a compact route — that saw the widest variety of architecture — and also started and ended at our headquarters. There are certainly many landmark buildings throughout the city, but we’ve chosen a mix of both iconic spaces and hidden treasures — all within a short walk of DAC.What are some of your favorite highlights? I enjoy the mix of so many different time periods in one compact tour. That’s the highlight for me: Being able to see how these diverse buildings are each a reflection of what was happening in Denmark at that time. Each building helps us understand how everything — from world events, technology, people, materials, economics, and what’s fashionable — impacts the choices designers make in every era. Looking across five different centuries provides a distinctive lens on this and it has proven to be a popular approach with our visitors.Are there any hidden gems this tour visits that even natives of Copenhagen are unaware of? The National Bank of Denmark was designed by one of the country’s most well-known architects and designers. Copenhagen natives likely know this building, but often only from its austere and solemn exterior. Many have never been inside. It has been fun to hear the small gasps of surprise from a few locals and visitors alike as they enter the lobby with us — an incredibly distinctive and elegant Mid-Century Modern space.Do you have a favorite time period for Danish architecture? A tough question! The Mid-Century Modernism, which is so well-recognized in Denmark, is a favorite — but not only for aesthetic reasons. When you examine the relationship between Denmark’s cultural values and the choices designers are making, it becomes even more interesting — especially for international visitors. Quality of life and good design for everyone, is at the heart of Danish architecture and this period exemplifies that.What would you say is the most unique piece of architecture in Copenhagen? We’re somewhat biased, but BLOX — the new home of Danish Architecture Center — is one of the most unique contemporary buildings in Copenhagen. Designed by the architecture firm OMA and completed this May, the building contains a unique mix of functions and spaces — galleries, education, offices, retail, fitness, restaurant, and residential. A city within the city. The building crosses under and over a main road to connect the old city to the harbor front.What’s the most overrated piece of architecture in Copenhagen? I think if you asked 100 Copenhagen residents this question, you may get 100 different answers! But that’s the beauty of this architectural city we inhabit. A place or space that resonates with one person can simply fall flat for another. In recent years, we’ve seen a growing awareness among architects that the urban spaces between and around buildings matter a great deal. For me, I think those buildings that don’t “talk” to their neighbors and the space around them in some way, are often overrated.What are some restaurants you would recommend for fueling up before a 75-minute walking tour? Our own DAC Cafe serves delicious meals and treats and provides stunning views of the city — both on the harbor terrace and the city terrace. Outside of DAC, the Copenhagen neighborhood of Refshaleoen is now home to Reffen — an eclectic mix of breweries and international street food vendors. The area was once the city’s shipyard and is an industrial area on the edge of massive change. You can easily hop on the harbor ferry bus (with your Metro/bus transit pass) and travel between Refshaleoen and the dock at DAC’s front door in about 20 minutes. What bar would you recommend for unwinding after the tour? Several of us at DAC enjoy Ved Stranden 10. It’s a lovely wine bar and shop located on the eastern side of the canal, which loops around Christiansborg Palace — a beautiful setting from which to watch a historic square and lively intersection at the edge of the old city.Are there architectural sites near Copenhagen that you would recommend for a day trip? Outside of central Copenhagen you’ll find Bagsvaerd Church — a true treasure designed by the Danish architect Jorn Utzon, most well-known for the Sydney Opera House. Designed in 1978, this late Modernist concrete building contains an exceptional interior where Utzon uses light and materials to create an incredible worship space. It’s worth the trip.(Note: 2018 is the celebration of Utozn’s 100th birthday. From November 9, 2018 — March 3, 2019, the Danish Architecture Center will be hosting a special exhibition: “Utzon, Horisont.”)Are there other essential cultural offerings that you would recommend?Copenhagen is filled with amazing summer festivals as we try to soak up the sun and long evenings. The Copenhagen Opera Festival just wrapped up — and we’re looking forward to two the Copenhagen Cooking and Food Festival.http://www.blouinartinfo.comFounder: Louise Blouin p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 17.0px Georgia; color: #d81e00} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; line-height: 15.0px; font: 12.8px Georgia; color: #1155cc} p.p3 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 32.0px Arial; color: #232323; min-height: 37.0px} p.p4 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 32.0px Arial; color: #232323} span.s1 {text-decoration: underline ; font-kerning: none} span.s2 {text-decoration: underline ; font-kerning: none; background-color: #ffffff} span.s3 {font-kerning: none; color: #222222; background-color: #ffffff} span.s4 {font-kerning: none} p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; line-height: 15.0px; font: 10.0px Times} span.s1 {letter-spacing: -0.2px}

Don’t want hit-and-run tourism in Venice: Alberta Pane

One doesn’t need an excuse to visit Venice. But the ongoing Biennale Architettura 2018 — 16th International Architecture Exhibition (through November 25) is a good enough reason if you need one. Given the popularity of Venice as a tourist destination, it
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Don’t want hit-and-run tourism in Venice: Alberta Pane

One doesn’t need an excuse to visit Venice. But the ongoing Biennale Architettura 2018 — 16th International Architecture Exhibition (through November 25) is a good enough reason if you need one. Given the popularity of Venice as a tourist destination, it isn’t a surprise that there are as many ‘Top Things to do in Venice’ lists as the searches you launch for this query. We, therefore, speak to a local — gallerist Alberta Pane of her eponymous Venetian gallery — to understand how to make the best of a trip to Venice without doing the usual touristy things. She also cautions against overdoing the touristy gig in Venice — it’s a World Heritage Site and the immense pressure of tourism, especially when the visitors are not mindful of its delicate ecosystem, can actually reduce it to just another misused heritage. Excerpts from the interview:How long have you lived in Venice and what do you like best about being a resident of this city?I was born in Venice and I lived here until I was in my 20s, when I moved to Paris, where I lived for 18 years and opened my gallery.Two years ago, I came back to Venice with the precise idea of opening the second venue of my gallery, because I believe that in Venice there is great potential for a contemporary art gallery, since everyone stops by and there is also the Venice Biennale of Contemporary Art and many new Foundations, museums and now a network of galleries that promote art throughout the year.And I like everything about being a resident here!What are the places in Venice that you would recommend all visitors to the city to not miss, even if they are coming for a short trip?Well, that’s hard to say, everything is surprising in Venice! For sure I would recommend a visit to the Venetian civic museums (such as Ca’ Pesaro, Palazzo Fortuny, Museo Correr, Palazzo Mocenigo, Ca’ Rezzonico...), which provide an opportunity to discover fantastic pieces of art in the context of magnificent ancient Venetian palaces. I would also suggest looking for art galleries and foundations, and visiting the Scuola Grande di San Rocco and Le Gallerie dell’Accademia. Moreover, I find the many paintings scattered in the beautiful Venetian churches fascinating. And get lost in the calli — Venetian narrow streets — that’s the best part!What are your favorite restaurants in the city that you would recommend to tourists as well?I really like Osteria Da Codroma, in calle dei Guardiani, for the very good food, nice people and the authentic Venetian atmosphere far from the most touristic part of the city. I also love the food of Il Vecio Fritolin. Even if the location is not as good as what you eat, the chef has studied in France and you can definitely taste it in his delicious dishes. Palazzina Grassi too is a place I would recommend.Any local dish that you would recommend visitors must try out while in Venice? And the best place to sample it?Definitely cuttlefish with polenta (seppie con polenta in Italian) or spaghetti with clams at Osteria Da Codroma, which, by the way, is just around my gallery.Where do you dash off to when you want a quick coffee and/or snack?I go to Campo Santa Margherita, where there are a lot of bars, tables and chairs to drink a relaxing coffee. I favor Caffe Rosso, their croissants are the best in the city!What are the best bars of Venice to hang out at after a long day?I really like that part of Venice called Fondamenta della Misericordia. Vino Vero is the best bar to hang out at, drinking good wine and chilling out with friends in a very friendly atmosphere, with a fantastic surrounding of course.Where should one head to attend a truly authentic Venice art party, during the biennale?I could not recommend one place specifically. What I love about the biennale is that a lot of Venetian Palaces, often closed to the public, are open. So, I would recommend going in the Palazzi Veneziani to be immersed in the truly authentic atmosphere of the city.Any local activity that one must participate in to get a feel of local Venice?Going to the market of Rialto to buy fresh and excellent food; going for a ‘Bacaro Tour’ with friends, that is to say to go to different bacari (typical Venetian sort of small restaurants where you can drink a glass of wine and eat the famous cicchetti); and just hang out in the Venetian streets and campi: residents spend a lot of their time here.What are the places a little outside of Venice that one can check out in a day’s trip?All the Isles of the Venetian Laguna are worth a daily trip.What would you do if you had a free morning or afternoon?I’d go to the isle of la Giudecca, just a vaporetto stop from the Zattere.Where in the city would you go to catch up on a book or to catch up with a friend?I’d go to Fujiyama, in calle lunga San Barnaba, a cozy tearoom with a hidden internal garden; the perfect place to relax with a friend or read a book quietly. And their cakes are really good too!Where would you advise visitors to go shopping?In the boutiques of Venetian artisans or in the small shops of design and clothing scattered throughout Venice. There is a lot of creativity in the city and it is important to invest on them... Absolute ban on buying knick-knacks and souvenirs for tourists...What’s the best souvenir to take away from Venice? And what are the best places to buy it?In my opinion, the best souvenir of Venice would be the catalogue of Palazzo Fortuny, one of the most interesting museums of the city. Or a nice book bought at Linea d’Acqua, Luca Zentilini’s ancient bookshop.What's the best place to buy art in Venice?Well, definitely my gallery in Calle dei Guardiani! It’s a former carpenter’s shop of 350 square meters, recently renovated and transformed into an evocative exhibition place for Contemporary art. And from my colleagues of the Venice Galleries View!What museums or galleries would you recommend one must definitely visit in the city, even if short on time?I would recommend the Contemporary art galleries of the Venice Galleries View. It’s an initiative made up of research galleries in order to support and enhance Contemporary art in Venice. You’ll find the project map with all the information about the galleries and their exhibitions all around Venice, in hotels and selected other places.Any walking trail you would recommend visitors to undertake to check out the city?Starting from Piazzale Roma, then I’d suggest go to Dorsoduro, reach the Zattere and Punta della dogana. I’d then go towards the Accademia, I’ll cross the Accademia Bridge, arriving in Campo Santo Stefano. By evening, I’d arrive at Piazza S. Marco, after 7 pm, definitely.Vaporetto or gondola, what do you prefer to absorb the sights and sounds of Venice?I’d rather go on foot, which is the best way to absorb the authentic atmosphere of Venice.What is the most overrated thing about Venice that is recommended by all and sundry?Its postcard facade, Venice, on the other hand, is a vibrant city that wants to continue to be one. The Venetians suffer a lot at this time for mass tourism that degrades it without bringing anything. It is very important to respect Venice when you come, to take the time to see it and not to practice a hit-and-run tourism. Venice is a jewel city, fragile, beautiful and a World Heritage Site.Anything that visitors to Venice must be cautious about?Make sure not to fall into the Venetian canals, not to hinder the Venetian people.Anything unusual or any hidden surprises about Venice that guide books do not mention?The best way to experience Venice is from a boat in those canals where there’s no riverbank and no docks. It is a sort of surreal experience: it seems to be in a labyrinth, to be in another world.http://www.blouinartinfo.comFounder: Louise Blouin p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 17.0px Georgia; color: #d81e00} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 32.0px Arial; color: #232323} span.s1 {text-decoration: underline ; font-kerning: none} span.s2 {font-kerning: none} p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'} span.s1 {font-kerning: none}

Melbourne Art Fair’s Maree Di Pasquale on the City’s Top Picks

p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; line-height: 16.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'; color: #3b3b3b; -webkit-text-stroke: #3b3b3b} span.s1 {font-kerning: none} As the flagship event of Melbourne Art Week — the Melbourne Art Fair, the 2018 edition of
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Melbourne Art Fair’s Maree Di Pasquale on the City’s Top Picks

p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; line-height: 16.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'; color: #3b3b3b; -webkit-text-stroke: #3b3b3b} span.s1 {font-kerning: none} As the flagship event of Melbourne Art Week — the Melbourne Art Fair, the 2018 edition of which runs August 2–5 — will feature 40 galleries that showcase contemporary artists from Australia, New Zealand and the region. When it was spearheaded in 1988, the Melbourne Art Fair was the first commercial fair of the Asia Pacific to establish a network for collectors within the Australian art market.A multifaceted program beyond the fair itself adds further dimension: The Project Rooms serve as a non-profit platform to present experimental work, a roster of interviews and panel discussions that promote dialogue and education around contemporary art practices and the global art market, and a site-specific video sector, TIME, extends across the city, focusing on female artists including Michaela Gleave (Anna Pappas Gallery, Melbourne) and Sriwhana Spong (Michael Lett, Auckland).Maree Di Pasquale, the Director and CEO of the Melbourne Art Fair since June 2017, came to this position after serving as a founding Director of Art Central Hong Kong (2014-2016). Pasquale revealed her favorite addresses for where to get good vintage items, where to stay out, al fresco, until 3 am, and — no small feat— where to sip the best coffee in Australia.BLOUIN ARTINFO spoke to Pasquale about the Melbourne Art Fair and the many attractions of the Australian city. Excerpts from the interview:How long have you been living in Melbourne?I have had a home here for seven years, and been living full-time since 2015.What are your “can’t leave without seeing this” recommendations for the city?Melbourne is more about experience than sightseeing. It’s about laneways, hidden rooftop bars, great food, live theater, experimental exhibitions and blockbuster museum shows. Although, if you are lucky enough to visit during summer, I would recommend a visit to MPavilion: a bold architecture commission and cultural laboratory developed by arts patron Naomi Milgrom AO. The 2018 MPavilion is designed by influential Barcelona-based architect Carme Pinos of Estudio Carme Pinos.What is the most overrated thing people advise visitors to check out when they’re in town?Brighton bathing boxes.What restaurants and/or cafes would you recommend (and what makes them unique)?Melbourne institution Cafe Di Stasio (St Kilda) with its white-jacket waiters, clean flavors and work by Melbourne-based, internationally recognized artist Callum Morton. Cumulus Inc. on Flinders Lane for breakfast — it’s worth the wait in line — and Miss Korea in Box Hill, an amazing Korean BBQ restaurant which is 14 km out of the city.What would you do if you had a free morning or afternoon in Melbourne?Take myself to Heide Museum of Modern Art: a public museum and modernist architectural icon with a rich social and artistic history that brings together art and architecture of the 20th and 21st century. The museum has an ambitious exhibition program and stunning sculpture garden that fills you with an overwhelming sense of nostalgia.Where would you head for the best shopping? Melbourne’s central business district and look out for favorites Lucy Folk on Crossley Lane and Marais on Bourke. Head to Collingwood for vintage design at Modern Times, Smith Street Bazaar, and Bruce boutique for vintage fashion.What’s an authentic item you could only buy locally?ST. Ali coffee beans by Salvatore Malatesta. Best coffee in Australia.Where would you recommend people stay when they visit? (i.e. favorite neighborhood, and/or favorite specific hotel/s?)QT Melbourne on Russell Street. Immaculate rooms with an impressive art collection developed under the guidance of Amanda Love, the hotel is in the heart of the fashion and gallery district and boasts a great rooftop bar.What are the best venues to check out exhibitions or collections in the city?Southbank Arts Precinct is home to many of Australia’s most important institutions, galleries and major events, including the new Melbourne Art Fair. I highly recommend a visit to the National Gallery of Victoria, Australian Centre for Contemporary Art (or ACCA as its affectionately known) and the newly opened Buxton Contemporary, a University of Melbourne museum formed from the extraordinary gift of collector and philanthropist Michael Buxton. The best part is that they are all within walking distance from one another.What are the best places to buy art?I am an advocate for commercial galleries and Melbourne has some of the best in the world. For those that are less familiar with the scene, Melbourne Art Fair is the best place to view a range of works from the region’s most important and exciting artists, represented by the region’s most respected galleries.What are the ideal spots to see live music?Melbourne has managed to protect its live music scene even though it constantly comes under attack by developers and the sensitive-eared. Melbourne’s North-side, Fitzroy and Collingwood, are the best spots to find live music any night of the week.Do you have a favorite book representative of Australia, or author who writes about the region in an especially evocative way?“Picnic at Hanging Rock” by Joan Lindsay has to be one of Australia’s greatest novels.What are your favorite bars to relax in after spending the day at the fair?Siglo, an open-air rooftop terrace on Spring Street, open through 3.00 am, or the delightful Madame Brussels by Miss Pearl.What are you most looking forward to about this latest edition of Melbourne Art Fair?The fair’s new, highly selective format: it presents 40 leading galleries from Australia, New Zealand and Southeast Asia, with a focus on solo presentations. This is quite a departure from previous editions, as is its new location in the heart of the Southbank Arts Precinct alongside the iconic Australian Centre for Contemporary Art.Other highlights include the unveiling of the Melbourne Art Foundation Commission, which in 2018 has been awarded to Ronnie van Hout and commissioned in partnership with Bendigo Art Gallery. There’s the debut of video sector, “Time”: a public moving-image platform that presents the work of four artists across Melbourne, including Jess Johnson’s “Webwurld,” which offers a glimpse into the hallucinatory netherworld of Johnson and her collaborator Simon Ward. You can catch it on the big screen at Federation Square, from July 30 to August 5.http://www.blouinartinfo.comFounder: Louise Blouin p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 17.0px Georgia; color: #d81e00} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 32.0px Arial; color: #232323} span.s1 {text-decoration: underline ; font-kerning: none} span.s2 {font-kerning: none}     

Cindy Hirschfeld’s Tips to Make the Best of Aspen

Every year, thousands flock to Aspen, Colorado, for its magisterial mountains and unmatched ski runs. While it’s easy to be overwhelmed by the natural beauty surrounding Aspen, it would be a shame to overlook the budding art scene, which is attracting more
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Cindy Hirschfeld’s Tips to Make the Best of Aspen

Every year, thousands flock to Aspen, Colorado, for its magisterial mountains and unmatched ski runs. While it’s easy to be overwhelmed by the natural beauty surrounding Aspen, it would be a shame to overlook the budding art scene, which is attracting more and more artists, galleries, and collectors thanks to art fairs like Art Aspen. From July 26-29, galleries specializing in Contemporary art will convene in the Aspen Ice Garden to showcase their works to collectors, tastemakers, and art enthusiasts. Produced by Urban Expositions, Art Aspen is one of four boutique art fairs Urban stages in cities across the US including Miami, Palm Springs, and Chicago.BLOUIN ARTINFO spoke to Cindy Hirschfeld, a member of the Host Committee for Art Aspen and Editor-in-Chief of Aspen Sojourner, about where to wine, dine, and unwind in Aspen and for recommendations on the many outdoor activities visitors can choose from. Excerpts from the interview:For those looking to take a break from Art Aspen, where might they go for a quiet afternoon?You do not have to be a John Denver fan to appreciate the sanctuary named for him along the Roaring Fork River. Find it behind Rio Grande Park, near the Theatre Aspen tent, and wander among the large rocks engraved with song lyrics, the beautiful wildflowers, and the soothing gurgle of the river. Continue on a riverside walk along the paved Rio Grande Trail.What are some of your favorite restaurants in or around Aspen?Bosq gets high marks for some of the town’s most innovative cuisine; it has a seasonally driven menu that incorporates Asian influences. I haven’t yet been to the new Clark’s Oyster Bar, an outpost of an Austin, Texas-based chain, but I’ve been hearing good things about it. Meat and Cheese Restaurant and Farm Shop has a tightly edited menu that’s always yummy — my favorite is the Vietnamese chicken salad with rice noodles. Chef’s Club’s new summer collaboration with San Francisco-based chef Matthew Accarrino offers a delicious take on modern Italian in a multi-course prix fixe.What’s a favorite bar to unwind after a long day at the art fair?Marble Distillery (in the Grand Hyatt Aspen) makes its own spirits and mixes them into tasty cocktails. Sip one on the patio outside. Hops Culture has some 200 beers and ciders, and small beer garden-style seating area in the middle of the Hyman Avenue Mall. The bar at Jimmy’s is usually happening for happy hour and again late night.Where should one go to catch some live music?Hands down, Belly Up Aspen. It’s a relatively intimate club (holds 450), has an awesome sound system, and draws in acts ranging from up and coming to well-known names (Melissa Etheridge, the Chainsmokers, Spoon) for sold-out shows.What are you most excited for about this year’s Art Aspen?Well, I’m actually on my way to Mongolia right now, so I’ll be missing this year’s event. But you could mention that Aspen Sojourner is hosting a party at the venue on Friday evening, July 27, 5–7 p.m., which will benefit Response, a local nonprofit that helps those affected by domestic violence and sexual trauma.What are some essential cultural offerings of Aspen that festival-goers ought to visit?The Aspen Art Museum, obviously; current shows include Cheryl Donegan, Nina Katchadourian, Larry Bell, Yto Barrada, and Jay DeFeo; admission is free. The building itself, designed by Shiguru Ban, is worth a visit, too; there’s an indoor-outdoor cafe on the rooftop deck. Don’t miss a concert from the Aspen Music Festival and School; there are multiple choices at various venues every day. A favorite Aspen tradition is to sit on the lawn outside of the Benedict Music Tent for the 4 p.m. Sunday concerts; of course, sitting inside the tent is pretty special, too. Theatre Aspen, which showcases actors from around the country, plays Godspell and Our Town the weekend of Art Aspen; the shows also take place inside a tent and offer an incomparably intimate viewing experience. Or check out Emmet Cohen and Christian Sands at Jazz Aspen Snowmass’s JAS Cafe; performances during Art Aspen weekend take place at the Cooking School of Aspen.What summer time outdoor activities would you recommend to visitors?Try to get in at least one hike, whether it’s walking along the level, paved Rio Grande Trail; taking the gondola up Aspen Mountain and exploring some of the trails at the top; or going on a longer outing to a destination like American Lake. Weller Lake, a short ways up the road to Independence Pass, is only a short roundtrip and ends in a lovely alpine setting. E-bike popularity is exploding this summer, as these bikes with a battery-powered assist are now allowed on paved trails; they are also a great way to ride up to the Maroon Bells in a more leisurely way than on a regular bike. The Lost Forest just opened at Snowmass ski area, about 20 minutes from Aspen; do laps on the mountain coaster (you control your speed) or try the new zipline canopy tour or ropes challenge courses.What are some scenic drives you would recommend?The road up Independence Pass is one of my favorite drives in the whole state. Just make sure you’re comfortable with lots of curves and some narrow sections of road. It takes about a half hour to get to the top of the pass (at the Continental Divide) from Aspen. And if you’re driving slowly and enjoying the scenery (which you should), please pull over and let other cars pass on by if you see a line of vehicles in your rearview mirror. The drive up the Fryingpan Valley from Basalt to Ruedi Reservoir is another beautiful tour, lined by red rock cliffs and leading to a large lake.What are three places nearby Aspen you would recommend for a day’s trip?Basalt, where I live, has a totally cute downtown with restaurants and boutiques. Plus, two rivers flow through town; if you like to fish, this is your spot. It’s about 18 miles down Highway 82 from Aspen. Another 15 minutes from Basalt is Carbondale, which has a cool creative vibe and lots of public art around town. Visit the gardens, including a labyrinth and reflexology path, at True Nature Arts Healing Center. A little over an hour from Aspen is the teeny town of Redstone, along the Crystal River. Visit galleries and have lunch poolside at the Redstone Inn; then continue south for another 10 minutes or so to the rustic town of Marble. The ruins of the original marble mill are fascinating to walk through (the quarry still operates today, but doesn’t offer public tours). Eat dinner at Slow Groovin’, a great BBQ joint that’s always busy.What’s the most overrated thing in Aspen?The Woody Creek Tavern. It’s a Mexican restaurant and one of its claims to fame is that Hunter S. Thompson, who lived nearby, used to hang out at the bar. It’s not bad, but very touristy.Where would you recommend people stay in Aspen (a particular neighborhood, street, or hotel)?Most of Aspen’s hotels are within walking distance of anywhere downtown. The Aspen Meadows Resort is a bit farther from downtown on the grounds of the Aspen Institute; it has cool Bauhaus architecture, large rooms, and lovely surroundings. And it runs regular shuttles into town. Or you might consider staying at the Viceroy in Snowmass Village (20 minutes away); Snowmass in summer is just gorgeous. p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 17.0px Georgia; color: #d81e00} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 32.0px Arial; color: #232323} span.s1 {text-decoration: underline ; font-kerning: none} span.s2 {font-kerning: none} http://www.blouinartinfo.comFounder: Louise Blouin 

All Eyes on Moscow: Garage Museum’s Anton Belov Shares the City’s Top Picks

As the World Cup comes to its final weekend, all eyes are on Moscow. When the games are over, the appeal of the city in summer remains — long, warm days, short nights, and a wealth of cultural capital to explore. Anton Belov is the director of the Garage Mu
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All Eyes on Moscow: Garage Museum’s Anton Belov Shares the City’s Top Picks

As the World Cup comes to its final weekend, all eyes are on Moscow. When the games are over, the appeal of the city in summer remains — long, warm days, short nights, and a wealth of cultural capital to explore. Anton Belov is the director of the Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow’s premiere private museum for new art. It houses the private collections of founder Dasha Zhukova and Roman Abramovich. Belov spoke to BLOUIN ARTINFO about his favorite aspects of the Russian megacity.How long have you been a resident of Moscow and what do you like best about the city?I was born in Moscow, but on the outskirts near the forest, so my “city center” life started when I went to the University of Steel and Alloys, which is next to Garage in Gorky Park. My real Moscow life began when I was 18. The best thing about this city is that it’s like a Russian merchant with a generous soul who is very open when he sets his mind to something.What are your “can’t leave without seeing this” recommendations for the city?Moscow is impossible without long-distance walking and visiting places like Tverskaya Street. It’s worth visiting the major museums, like the Pushkin Museum with its Impressionists or the Tretyakov Gallery with its amazing Russian collections, from icons to Contemporary art. And, of course, if you want to have the ultimate Moscow experience you should not limit your visit to museums but go to the Bolshoi Theater and see some night life (like bars). Moscow has lots of fantastic restaurants which are good for tourists, like Cafe Pushkin and Dr. Zhivago, and places that specialize in local food like Severyane and Sakhli.What is the most overrated thing people advise visitors to see or visit when they are in town?Things like Red Sqaure or Zaryadye Park or GUM department store (which is basically a huge shop) are really overrated and packed with crowds of people, thousands of them. If you want to have a unique experience don’t stick to the “to do list.” Make up your own program!What are your must-visit restaurants and/or cafes and what makes them unique?I think Coffeemania is amazing. It’s the best cafe in the world. If you want to have a real Moscow experience go to the centrally-located ones, such as the one near the Conservatoire, or those that are open 24/7. I think Severyane restaurant is a must. So is Sakhli: It serves Georgian food, the place is small but feels like home. These are the key places for me to eat. And now there are lots of food markets in Moscow where you can find small restaurants and buy fresh fruit and vegetables.What would you do if you had a free morning or afternoon in Moscow?If I had half a day free in Moscow I would definitely play sport. In summer I like to go to Neskuchny Sad park to work out or just jog. I also like Chaika open-air swimming pool where you can enjoy outdoor swimming in the center of Moscow. Or I might visit other museums managed by my friends, like Multimedia Art Museum and Moscow Museum of Modern Art.What are the bars/places you would recommend to football fans to chill out at after an intense World Cup match?Strelka bar is a great place for foreigners to enjoy the World Cup atmosphere. It’s in the heart of Moscow and is a place for creative people. There’s a really friendly vibe. Definitely a must go place.What are your recommendations for shopping in the city?If you have lots of money, go to Prada. The Moscow store is the best in the world. It’s packed with new clothes and the brand is not that popular in Moscow, so you can always buy amazing things, including products from collaborations (such as with Rem Koolhaas and Burliuk). There are also TsUM and GUM with fashion and luxury boutiques. But if you want something more cool, edgy, and hip, try stores like Leform and Brandshop.Where would you recommend people stay when they visit?There are plenty of big hotels like the Ritz Carlton or the Four Seasons. But if you’re not traveling in a big group then go for something unusual. I recommend Moss boutique hotel, which is in the Kitay-gorod area, near Lubyanka. It’s a unique hotel right in the center of the city.Where would you go in Moscow to quietly catch up on a book or to catch up with a friend?As I spend most of my time at Garage, I meet my friends at Garage Cafe, where we have a great chef. Most of my friends come there to meet me and then I can stay on for other meetings. This works best for me.Which is your favorite bookstore in Moscow?It’s the same with bookstores. My favorite is Garage Bookshop. It stocks around 9,000 titles and new books keep coming. The team brings in the best books from around the world. So I don’t need any other bookstore.What are the best venues to check out exhibitions or collections in the city?You should always check out the Pushkin Museum and Tretyakov Gallery (especially the New Tretyakov, which has 20th-century art). Definitely Multimedia Art Museum and Moscow Museum of Modern Art. And if you have time to go to some unusual places, you should definitely visit a small museum: there are 300–400 of them in the city center. Try the Maxim Gorky Museum in the Ryabushinsky Mansion or the house-museum of the great Russian architect Konstantin Melnikov. They are real hidden gems.Any hidden surprises about Moscow that are not easy to find in travel guidebooks?You never find fascinating museums like the State Museum of Oriental Art or the Melnikov House, which is impossible to visit without advance booking, or the Museum of Architecture, which is a real sleeping beauty because it has an amazing collection but tiny exhibition spaces and insufficient space for its permanent collection of great Russian avant-garde architecture. If you have local friends you should ask them and they will help you to find these treasures.http://www.blouinartinfo.comFounder: Louise Blouin p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 17.0px Georgia; color: #d81e00} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 32.0px Arial; color: #232323} span.s1 {text-decoration: underline ; font-kerning: none} span.s2 {font-kerning: none} p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 18.0px Times}

Snapshots of Arles with Sam Stourdzé, Director, Rencontres d’Arles

At the Rencontres d’Arles — the longstanding summer photography festival founded in the south of France in 1970 — exhibitions run the gamut from photojournalism to fashion photography to emerging artists to virtual reality immersion. There is also a sec
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Snapshots of Arles with Sam Stourdzé, Director, Rencontres d’Arles

At the Rencontres d’Arles — the longstanding summer photography festival founded in the south of France in 1970 — exhibitions run the gamut from photojournalism to fashion photography to emerging artists to virtual reality immersion. There is also a section dedicated to international photography publishers, celebrating the creativity of the medium in book form.Presented in ancient vaulted churches and Contemporary art venues throughout the Provencal city, this 49th edition, on view July 2-– September 23, focuses on several umbrella themes. The “America Great Again!” sector includes deep dives into the work of Robert Frank, Laura Henno, and Paul Graham. A section called “The World As It Is” surveys shifting global realities, from Turkey’s current socio-political upheaval to Chechnya’s process of healing to China’s arranged marriages. The “Dialogues” section bridges works by Picasso and Godard, as well as Everlyn Jane Atwood and Joan Colom. All of these compelling and diverse shows are overseen by the fair’s director, Sam Stourdze, who formerly led the Musee de l’Elysee in Lausanne, Switzerland. In an interview with BLOUIN ARTINFO, Stourdze discussed the new aspects of the 2018 fair and the region’s can’t miss-architecture, from a large pop-up (adapted from a structure shown at 2016 Venice Biennale) to exquisite centuries-old edifices.How long have you been living in Arles?Since I’ve been the director of the Rencontres, which I was appointed in 2014.What is your “can’t leave without seeing this” recommendation for the city?This year, we’ve built a monumental bamboo pavilion — an exceptional structure imagined by Colombian architect Simon Velez. It’s a 1000 square-meter pop-up along the Rhone river, which provides a very meditative venue within the festival; there will be an exhibition dedicated to the black-and-white photographs of [Buddhist monk] Matthieu Ricard there.Do you have a favorite permanent architectural site?The Cloitre de Saint-Trophime, a chef-d’oeuvre of Romanesque architecture. It’s a classified world monument by UNESCO for its patrimonial heritage.What local tradition would you advise visitors to check out when they’re in town?Meeting the Reine d’Arles and the demoiselles d’honneur— it’s a singular Arles event. Every three years, there are elections for the queen. It’s a popular tradition: you need to know how to dress in the Provencal garb, speak the Provencal dialect…What are your favorite cafes or restaurants?This year, we collaborated with Louis Vuitton City Guides for an 120-page Arles guide that is very complete regarding all the best local spots. I’d rather recommend that.How would you spend a free morning or afternoon in Arles?I would go to the beach 45 minutes outside of Arles, to the Calanques [steep inlets carved into the limestone Mediterranean coast]: they’re magnificent. The Calanque du Grand Mejean is the absolute loveliest.Where would you recommend people stay when they visit?There are two neighborhoods in opposite directions from the city center. On the one hand there’s the Hauture, in the heights of Arles, situated above the Arenes amphitheater: a beautiful area that’s wonderful to get lost in. Then there’s the popular La Roquette, which is the quarter once populated by gypsies and sailors, made up of small streets lovely to wander through.What are the best art venues to check out beyond the Rencontres d’Arles programming?The Fondation Van Gogh is a very pleasant venue where you can see Contemporary art exhibitions. The Musee de Departemental de l’Arles Antique is a referential museum of its kind. There are regular excavations in the Rhone region, which means pieces are added to the collection all the time, like the exceptional bust of Caesar that was recently discovered. Recommended reading: Is there an author — native to Arles or otherwise — who depicts the region especially well?In terms of historical reading, Frederic Mistral is a great Provencal author. In more Contemporary literature, the latest novel by Sylvain Prudhomme, “Legende,” grasped the region very well.This is the 49th edition of the festival. What is unprecedented about this year?We’re adding new exhibition spaces, and they’ll be rather surprising discoveries. The Croisiere, in the city center at the corner of Boulevard Emile-Combes and Avenue Victor-Hugo, is new space we debuted last year; we will open additional floors of the buildings, which will double — almost triple — the exhibition space. We’re a festival, so what’s lucky about that is to have 35 exhibitions all at the same time, rather than one after the other… Thirty-five exhibitions is between eight to 10 years of programming for a single museum! People stay an average of three days and see an average of ten exhibitions. Not all 35 exhibitions, but it’s still quite a lot.http://www.blouinartinfo.comFounder: Louise Blouin p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 18.0px Times} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 18.0px Times; color: #d81e00} p.p3 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 18.0px Times; color: #232323} span.s1 {text-decoration: underline ; font-kerning: none} span.s2 {font-kerning: none}

In A City Of Perennial Pleasures: Q&A with Philip Hewat-Jaboor, Chairman, Masterpiece London

The fair chairman on his favorite drinks & restaurants, must-visit museums, and London’s lesser-known gems.MASTERPIECE LONDON, (June 28-July 4) is the self-described “cross-collecting” art fair at which visitors can peruse and purchase great works o
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In A City Of Perennial Pleasures: Q&A with Philip Hewat-Jaboor, Chairman, Masterpiece London

The fair chairman on his favorite drinks & restaurants, must-visit museums, and London’s lesser-known gems.MASTERPIECE LONDON, (June 28-July 4) is the self-described “cross-collecting” art fair at which visitors can peruse and purchase great works of art, design, furniture, and jewelry. Of the 160 exhibitors, many are from London, but the fair is truly global, with galleries coming from Geneva to Montreal, Hong Kong to Delhi. Each participant is vetted by a committee of international specialists drawn from academia, auction houses, and museums.Last year, a dedicated large-scale exhibition space called “Masterpiece Presents” debuted, welcoming an immersive work of art by the Chilean artist Ivan Navarro.This year, the showcase will feature a new experimental work, produced in Madrid, by Marina Abramovic: namely a set of alabaster portraits merging performance, light, and sculpture titled “Five Stages of Maya Dance.”BLOUIN ARTINFO spoke to Philip Hewat-Jaboor, Chairman of Masterpiece London, about where he likes to dine solo and his fondness for Sir John Soane.How long have you been a Londoner?I started working for Sotheby’s in 1972 and have remained in London ever since, although I now reside more often in the Channel Island of Jersey.What are your “can’t leave without seeing this” recommendations for the city?The Weston Tower, the extraordinary new addition to Westminster Abbey by Ptolemy Dean, and the gallery to which it leads, should not be missed. The Sir John Soane’s Museum — the architect’s house museum — has been influential from the beginning, and now has newly opened spaces and a really imaginative exhibition program.What is the most overrated thing to see or visit in London?Musicals.What restaurants and/or cafes would you recommend (and what makes them unique)?My all-time favorite has to be the Caprice, which I started going to after its reopening in 1981. The food is consistent and superb, in excellent and comfortable surroundings. The River Cafe opened by Ruth Rogers (Sir Richard Rogers’ wife) and Rose Gray with their pioneering modern cooking, idyllically placed by the side of the River Thames, is also fantastic. They grow much of their own produce and aside from superb food have nurtured a new generation of cooks.What would you do if you had a free morning or afternoon in London?I would probably take myself to the Wallace Collection and wander serendipitously through their collections of French 18th century decorative arts, master paintings and extraordinary arms and armor. Endlessly stimulating.Where would you head for the best shopping?St James’s and Mayfair.What’s an authentic item you could buy locally?Violet and rose cream chocolates from Charbonnel et Walker.Where would you recommend people stay when they visit?It is always best to stay centrally in any city and I would choose Duke’s Hotel tucked away in St. James’s. It is comfortable and has one of the finest bars in London — indeed, the only place for a serious martini or a piscine [most commonly, champagne served with plenty of ice].What are the best venues to check out exhibitions or collections in the city?The obvious museums — The Victoria and Albert, and British Museums, Tate Modern — are essential visiting but perhaps slightly less well known might be the Courtauld Gallery with its remarkable collection of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings and the Dulwich Picture Gallery with its master painting collection displayed in a marvelous neo-classical building designed by Sir John Soane for the collection. Both of these galleries are the collections of individual and philanthropic private collectors.What are the best places to buy art?Art should be always bought from dealers and galleries with whom a relationship of trust is built. Masterpiece is the perfect place for the less well acquainted to buy a great variety of works in all disciplines, offered for sale by highly respected international dealers.What are your favorite bars to relax in after spending the day at the fair?I usually finish very late and if I have no dinner to attend I like to eat on my own at Le Caprice, which is almost adjacent to Boodle’s, the club where I stay in London.What are you most looking forward to about this newest edition of Masterpiece London?June is the highlight of the summer season and a visit to Masterpiece is of course essential. I am very excited about Masterpiece Presents — our new dedicated exhibition space — this year we present a sensational new work by Marina Abramovic, “Five Stages of Maya Dance.”What never ceases to excite me, however, is the extraordinary range of beautiful works of art in all disciplines, drawn from all over the world, that our passionate exhibitors bring to Masterpiece to astonish, delight and tempt.http://www.blouinartinfo.comFounder: Louise Blouin 

Navigating Basel with Elena Filipovic, Director, Kunsthalle Basel

No matter where you are, it’s difficult to avoid hearing about Basel at this time of the year, when the charming Swiss city turns into the entire art world’s must-visit destination, thanks to Art Basel (June 14-17 this year) and the other important fairs
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Navigating Basel with Elena Filipovic, Director, Kunsthalle Basel

No matter where you are, it’s difficult to avoid hearing about Basel at this time of the year, when the charming Swiss city turns into the entire art world’s must-visit destination, thanks to Art Basel (June 14-17 this year) and the other important fairs such as Design Miami/Basel (June 12-17), VOLTA (June 11-16) and LISTE (June 11-17). Even though Basel takes art and culture very seriously — its 40 museums give it the highest concentration in Switzerland — there is a lot more to the city than art.BLOUIN ARTINFO spoke to Elena Filipovic, director of the venerable Kunsthalle Basel, to get an idea of how best to mix art and the rest when visiting this beautiful city by the Rhine. The American-born director has been at the helm of the institution since November 2014. She has a newcomer’s enthusiasm for the city and a local’s knowledge. She shared with us her ideas for making the most from a visit to the city during the wealth of June art fairs. How long have you been living in Basel and what do you like best about the city?I’ve been here three and a half years, which is almost nothing and an eternity at the same time if I think about how much I’ve been lucky enough to see and do since I’ve arrived. The quantity and variety and, above all, quality, of museums and cultural institutions in such a small city, is unparalleled. The citizens of Basel really care about culture and their art institutions, which is exceptional.What are the three best places near Basel that you would recommend for a day’s trip?As France is right around the corner, a day trip to Colmar, a beautiful city not even an hour from Basel, is a great destination. The museum Unterlinden and its extension by Herzog & de Meuron, showcasing the breathtaking Isenheim Altarpiece, is a must-see. Or, a fast train to Paris gets you to the city of lights in about three hours. When heading in the direction of Central Switzerland, you could explore the Emma Kunz Center, including her grotto, where the Swiss artist and healer detected telluric forces.If one were staying on in Basel after the fair, what are the activities in and around Basel you would recommend for a memorable trip?Top on my list would be to visit the Goetheanum in Dornach, just 30 minutes away. It is a wild and amazing piece of architecture inspired by Rudolf Steiner. Another gem is the Botanical Garden, it’s relatively small but a great place. The Natural Pool in Riehen is a lovely alternative to swimming in the Rhine on hot summer days.What are the best places in Basel to unwind after a day at the fair?Have drinks during sunset at Landestelle, located at Basel’s old harbor, with bars, grill, a skateboard park and a nice view over the Rhine.What are your favorite restaurants in and around Basel that you would recommend to visitors to the city?Kunsthalle Restaurant, of course! Every artist who has ever shown at the Kunsthalle upstairs has eaten there, so it is pretty much haunted with great art spirits. And most people don’t know it, but now there is this room at the back of the restaurant (a hidden treasure) where Verner Panton’s 1972 massive mother of pearl chandelier, originally made for his own home, was recently installed. It’s a gorgeous piece of design history…and everyone looks good under that light! Additionally, I really like Rhyschanzli, Volkshaus, Trio, and Goldenes Fass.Any local dish/ produce that visitors must experience?Hache Hornli is a typical dish made of the surprising combination of macaroni, ground meat, and applesauce. It’s still served at the Kunsthalle Restaurant but so is my favorite, the Kunsthalle Burger. And then, of course, there is Fondue, which is best eaten with friends at someone’s home (I learned the Swiss also eat it in summer!).Where should one go to catch the best live music/music scene in the city?The Birds Eyes Jazz Club!What is the favorite outdoor activity of the local residents of Basel that tourists must indulge in for an authentic experience?You must go swim in the Rhine! There is nothing quite like it. There are these special “Fish” bags that are for sale everywhere and you use them to protect your clothing and shoes and phone and then you jump in with it and it doubles as a floatation device. The Swiss really have figured things out! And the really brave will take a small boat and float down the Birs, a small side river to the Rhine.Where would you advise your visitors to go shopping?Set & Sekt, OOID, LOKAL, but also what’s called the Quartierflohmarkte (the flea markets around different neighborhoods in town, where everyone can just sell their secondhand things in front of their door). And I do recommend to checkhttp://wiewaersmalmit.ch/ which is a great initiative by two young ladies, Ana and Derya, who publish portraits of shop owners and cultural producers of Basel on a weekly basis.Where would you go in Basel to quietly catch up on a book or to catch up with a friend?The Museum Tinguely’s Solitude Park is underrated, it’s a beautiful and quiet spot in the shade of Switzerland’s tallest building.Which is your favorite bookstore in Basel?The Bucher-Broky, a second-hand shop that only sells books, located in an industrial hall in the Gundeli district, is a fun place to browse around some books while listening to the classical music that is being played in the background.Any hidden surprises about Basel that are not easy to find in travel guidebooks?I was told a small basilisk (a legendary reptile reputed to be a serpent king) lives in the botanical garden’s tropical house.http://www.blouinartinfo.comFounder: Louise Blouin p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 17.0px Georgia; color: #d81e00} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 32.0px Arial; color: #232323} span.s1 {text-decoration: underline ; font-kerning: none} span.s2 {font-kerning: none} p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 18.0px Times}

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