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Light from ancient quasars helps confirm quantum entanglement

New research boosts the case for quantum entanglement. Scientists have used distant quasars, one of which emitted its light 7.8 billion years ago and the other 12.2 billion years ago, to determine the measurements to be made on pairs of entangled photons. The

Gene therapy vectors carrying the telomerase gene do not increase the risk of cancer

Researchers have shown in a new study that the gene therapy with telomerase that they have developed, and which has proven to be effective in mice against diseases caused by excessive telomere shortening and ageing, does not cause cancer or increase the risk

Proposal seeks to improve assessment of drug risks

A drug policy researcher is proposing a suite of changes to overhaul the Multi-Criteria Drug Harm Scale, which informs drug policies across Europe. The changes focus on addressing use and abuse separately, collecting input from a broader range of stakeholders

New in­form­a­tion on brain areas linked to tact­ile sense and meta­cog­nit­ive abil­ity

A new doctoral thesis gives information on the neural basis of the sense of touch. According to the results, magnetic stimulation of prefrontal cortex affected the subjects' performance in tactile tasks, and their ability to evaluate their performance in thes

Helping surgical patients taper off opioids safely and successfully

A unique pain program is helping complex surgical patients wean off opioids safely and effectively, while offering alternative ways to cope with their pain and improve how they function.

Racial disparities in prescribing opioids for chronic pain

Researchers have identified racial disparities in the treatment of patients who are prescribed opioids for chronic pain. Black patients who receive opioids long-term are more likely than whites to be tested for illicit drug use. Of those who test positive, bl

Illicit drug use could be higher than previously thought; soars during special events

America's drug problem may be even worse than officials realize. And illicit drugs are consumed at a higher rate during celebratory events. Those are just two of the conclusions scientists have drawn from recent studies of drug residues in sewage.

Antidepressant restores youthful flexibility to aging inhibitory neurons in mice

Inhibitory neurons in the aging brain show reduced growth and plasticity, likely contributing to declines in brain function. In a new study in mice researchers show that treatment with fluoxetine restored substantial growth and plasticity.

Consuming milk at breakfast lowers blood glucose throughout the day

A change in breakfast routine may provide benefits for the management of type 2 diabetes, according to a new study. A team of scientists found that milk consumed with breakfast cereal reduced postprandial blood glucose concentration compared with water, and h

Nice sunny days can grow into heat waves -- and wildfires: summer weather is stalling

Stalling summer weather as we are experiencing right now in the Northern hemisphere can turn into 'extreme extremes' from heat to drought, from rain to flood.

Stone tools reveal modern human-like gripping capabilities 500,000 years ago

Research demonstrates that a technique used to produce stone tools that were first found half a million years ago is likely to have needed a modern human-like hand. This links a stone tool production technique known as 'platform preparation' to the biology o

A paper battery powered by bacteria

In remote areas of the world, everyday items like electrical outlets and batteries are luxuries. Health care workers in these areas often lack electricity to power diagnostic devices, and commercial batteries may be too expensive. Today, researchers report a

Weaponizing oxygen to kill infections and disease

The life-threatening bacteria MRSA can cripple a medical facility since it is resistant to treatment. But scientists report that they are now making advances in a new technique that avoids antibiotics, instead using light to activate oxygen, which wipes out b

Insight into development of lung cancer

Lung cancer results from effects of smoking along with multiple genetic components. A new study identifies two main pathways for the role of chromosome 15q25.1 -- a leader in increasing susceptibility to lung cancer -- in modifying disease risk. One pathway i

Making aquafeed more sustainable: Scientists develop feeds using a marine microalga co-product

Scientists have created a more sustainable feed for aquaculture by using a marine microalga co-product as a feed ingredient. The study is the first of its kind to evaluate replacing fishmeal with a co-product in feed designed specifically for Nile tilapia.

Water-worlds are common: Exoplanets may contain vast amounts of water

Scientists have shown that water is likely to be a major component of those exoplanets (planets orbiting other stars) which are between two to four times the size of Earth. It will have implications for the search of life in our Galaxy.

World's first-ever 4D printing for ceramics

A ground-breaking advancement in materials research by successfully developing the world's first-ever 4D printing for ceramics, which are mechanically robust and can have complex shapes. This could turn a new page in the structural application of ceramics.

Acid coastal seas off US putting common fish species at risk

Scientists have shown that coastal waters and river estuaries can exhibit unique vulnerabilities to acidification than offshore waters. This acidification, detected in waters off the United States West Coast and the Gulf of Mexico, can lead to disorientation

Students more likely to eat school breakfast when given extra time, new study finds

Using food weighting stations, the researchers collected information on the number of students who ate a school breakfast, how much they ate, and their exact nutritional intake.

Perinatal hypoxia associated with long-term cerebellar learning deficits and Purkinje cell misfiring

The type of hypoxia that occurs with preterm birth is associated with locomotor miscoordination and long-term cerebellar learning deficits but can be partially alleviated with an off-the-shelf medicine, according to a study using a preclinical model.

A valley so low: Electrons congregate in ways that could be useful to 'valleytronics'

Researchers have made a finding that could help usher in new area of technology called 'valleytronics.' The study found that electrons in bismuth crystals prefer to collect in one valley rather than being distributed equally across valleys, setting up a type

Chemistry professor develops contaminant detection technique for heparin

In 2008, a contaminant eluded the quality safeguards in the pharmaceutical industry and infiltrated a large portion of the supply of the popular blood thinner heparin, sickening hundreds and killing about 100 in the US.

Exploring the relationship between fever and cancer incidence

In a new paper, researchers propose a mechanistic hypothesis that focuses on the potential impact infectious fever has on a particular subset of T cells, known as gamma/delta T cells.

Like shark attacks and the lottery, unconscious bias influences cancer screening

Study shows that doctors with personal experience of cancer are more likely to act against established guidelines to recommend that low-risk women receive ovarian cancer screening.

Ants, acorns and climate change

The relatively swift adaptability of tiny, acorn-dwelling ants to warmer environments could help scientists predict how other species might evolve in the crucible of global climate change, according to biologists.

Astronomers observe cosmic steam jets and molecules galore

A team of scientists using the highest-frequency capabilities of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has uncovered jets of warm water vapor streaming away from a newly forming star. The researchers also detected the 'fingerprints' of an as

A novel synthetic antibody enables conditional 'protein knockdown' in vertebrates

Researchers have developed a novel synthetic antibody that paves the way for an improved functional analysis of proteins.

Robots as tools and partners in rehabilitation

Why trust should play a crucial part in the development of intelligent machines for medical therapies.

Moderate carbohydrate intake may be best for health, study suggests

A new study has found that diets both low and high in carbohydrates were linked with an increase in mortality, while moderate consumers of carbohydrates had the lowest risk of mortality. The study also found that low-carb diets that replace carbohydrates wit

New CRISPR technique skips over portions of genes that can cause disease

In a new study in cells, researchers have adapted CRISPR gene-editing technology to cause the cell's internal machinery to skip over a small portion of a gene when transcribing it into a template for protein building. Such targeted editing could one day be us

Men and women show surprising differences in seeing motion

Researchers have found an unexpected difference between men and women. On average, their studies show, men pick up on visual motion significantly faster than women do.

Researchers are developing vaccines for human parasites

Researchers outline their lessons learned while creating vaccine candidates for hookworm and schistosomiasis.

Human wastewater valuable to global agriculture, economics

It may seem off-putting to some, but human waste is full of nutrients that can be recycled into valuable products that could promote agricultural sustainability and better economic independence for some developing countries, says a new study.

Novel sensors could enable smarter textiles

A fabric coating with thin, lightweight and flexible pressure sensors that can be embedded into shoes and other functional garments, sensors that can measure everything from the light touch of a finger to being driven over by a forklift. And it's comfortable

Previously grainy wheat genome comes into focus

An international consortium has completed the sequence of wheat's colossal genome.

Under pressure, hydrogen offers a reflection of giant planet interiors

Lab-based mimicry allowed an international team of physicists to probe hydrogen under the conditions found in the interiors of giant planets -- where experts believe it gets squeezed until it becomes a liquid metal, capable of conducting electricity.

More workers working might not get more work done, ants (and robots) show

For ants and robots operating in confined spaces like tunnels, having more workers does not necessarily mean getting more work done. Just as too many cooks in a kitchen get in each other's way, having too many robots in tunnels creates clogs that can bring th

Sprawling galaxy cluster found hiding in plain sight

Scientists have uncovered a sprawling new galaxy cluster hiding in plain sight. The cluster, which sits a mere 2.4 billion light years from Earth, is made up of hundreds of individual galaxies and surrounds an extremely active supermassive black hole, or quas

New manufacturing technique could improve common problem in printing technology

A new manufacturing technique may be able to avoid the 'coffee ring' effect that plagues inkjet printers.

Brain response study upends thinking about why practice speeds up motor reaction times

Researchers report that a computerized study of 36 healthy adult volunteers asked to repeat the same movement over and over became significantly faster when asked to repeat that movement on demand -- a result that occurred not because they anticipated the mov
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