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Soot transported from elsewhere in world contributes little to melting of some Antarctic glaciers

Airborne soot produced by wildfires and fossil-fuel combustion and transported to the remote McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica contains levels of black carbon too low to contribute significantly to the melting of local glaciers, according to a new study.

Human 'chimeric' cells restore crucial protein in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Cells made by fusing a normal human muscle cell with a muscle cell from a person with Duchenne muscular dystrophy -- a rare but fatal form of muscular dystrophy -- were able to significantly improve muscle function when implanted into the muscles of a mouse m

Plasmons triggered in nanotube quantum wells

A novel quantum effect observed in a carbon nanotube film could lead to the development of near-infrared lasers and other optoelectronic devices, according to scientists.

Genetic variant discovery to help asthma sufferers

Researchers have identified a genetic variant that could improve the safety and effectiveness of corticosteroids, drugs that are used to treat a range of common and rare conditions including asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Piezomagnetic material changes magnetic properties when stretched

Piezoelectric materials, which generate an electric current when compressed or stretched, are familiar and widely used: lighters that spark when you press a switch, microphones, sensors, motors and all kinds of other devices. Now a group of physicists has fou

Chirping is welcome in birds but not in fusion devices

Birds do it and so do doughnut-shaped fusion facilities called 'tokamaks.' But tokamak chirping -- a rapidly changing frequency wave that can be far above what the human ear can detect -- is hardly welcome to researchers who seek to bring the fusion that powe

The absence of ants: Entomologist confirms first Saharan farming 10,000 years ago

By analysing a prehistoric site in the Libyan desert, a team of researchers has been able to establish that people in Saharan Africa were cultivating and storing wild cereals 10,000 years ago. In addition to revelations about early agricultural practices, the

Mice change their appearance as a result of frequent exposure to humans

Many tame domesticated animals have a different appearance compared to their relatives in the wild, for example white patches in their fur or shorter snouts. Researchers have now for the first time shown that wild house mice develop the same visible changes -

Two better than one: Chemists advance sustainable battery technology

Chemists describe design and synthesis of a pi-conjugation-extended viologen molecule as a novel, two-electron storage anolyte for neutral total organic aqueous redox flow batteries.

Improved capture of cancer cells in blood could help track disease

New research builds on several years of work in isolating circulating tumor cells, or CTCs, by demonstrating improved methods for their capture on clinical samples for the first time.

Clearing clumps of protein in aging neural stem cells boosts their activity

Young, resting neural stem cells in the brains of mice store large clumps of proteins in specialized cellular trash compartments known as lysosomes, researchers have found.

New understanding of parasite biology might help stop malaria transmission

Researchers made an important step toward deeper understanding of how malaria blood stage parasites turn the switch to become transmissible to other humans. This knowledge is fundamental for future research aiming to interrupt malaria transmission.

Artificial sweetener could intensify symptoms in those with Crohn's disease

In a study that has implications for humans with inflammatory diseases, researchers have found that, given over a six-week period, the artificial sweetener sucralose, known by the brand name Splenda, worsens gut inflammation in mice with Crohn's disease, but

Ending overfishing would stop the population declines of endangered bycatch species about half the time

A study finds that ending overfishing would stop the population declines of endangered bycatch species about half the time.

Childhood aggression linked to deficits in executive function

Researchers find that primary school children with reduced cognitive skills for planning and self-restraint are more likely to show increased aggression in middle childhood. The study examined the relationship between aggression and executive function -- a me

Modern humans interbred with Denisovans twice in history

Modern humans co-existed and interbred not only with Neanderthals, but also with another species of archaic humans, the mysterious Denisovans. Research now describes how, while developing a new genome-analysis method for comparing whole genomes between moder

Topsy-turvy currents key to removing nitrate from streams

More than 500 years ago, Leonardo da Vinci sketched what he called 'la turbolenza,' comparing chaotic swirls atop flowing water to curly human hair. It turns out those patterns influence myriad phenomena, from the drag on an airplane's wings and the formatio

Scientists discover evidence of early human innovation, pushing back evolutionary timeline

Scientists discovered that early humans in East Africa had -- by about 320,000 years ago -- begun trading with distant groups, using color pigments and manufacturing more sophisticated tools than those of the Early Stone Age, tens of thousands of years earlie

Researchers create a protein 'mat' that can soak up pollution

In a breakthrough that could lead to a new class of materials with functions found only in living systems, scientists have figured out a way to keep certain proteins active outside of the cell. The researchers used this technology to create mats that can soa

A new use for graphene: Making better hair dyes

Graphene, a naturally black material, could provide a new strategy for dyeing dark hair that will make it less prone to staticky flyaways. Researchers have put it to the test. They used sheets of graphene to make a dye that adheres to the surface of hair, for

Physically fit women nearly 90 percent less likely to develop dementia

Women with high physical fitness at middle age were nearly 90 percent less likely to develop dementia decades later, compared to women who were moderately fit, according to a new study. The study measured the women's cardiovascular fitness based on an exercis

Half a degree more global warming could flood out 5 million more people

A new study finds that by 2150, the seemingly small difference between a global temperature increase of 1.5 and 2.0 degrees Celsius would mean the permanent inundation of lands currently home to about 5 million people, including 60,000 who live on small islan

Reconsidering damage production and radiation mixing in materials

An international team of researchers present new mathematical equations that with minimal increase in computational complexity allow for accurate and experimentally testable predictions.

Teenagers more likely to plead guilty to crimes they didn't commit

Teenagers are more likely to plead guilty to crimes they did not commit because they are less able to make mature decisions, new research shows.

Space radiation more hazardous: Implication sfor astronauts and satellites

It might sound like something from a science fiction plot - astronauts traveling into deep space being bombarded by cosmic rays - but radiation exposure is science fact. As future missions look to travel back to the moon or even to Mars, new research caution

Tradeoffs between weaponry and fecundity in snapping shrimp queens vary with eusociality

Amongst species of colonial snapping shrimp, the capacity for defense versus reproduction in queens varies with the level of cooperation, according to a new study.

E-cigarettes may be more harmful than beneficial, according to evidence-based research

A new study finds that e-cigarette use could do more harm than good by substantially increasing the number of adolescents and young adults who eventually become cigarette smokers and marginally decreasing the number of adult cigarette smokers who quit.

Brain genes related to innovation revealed in birds

Wild birds that are more clever than others at foraging for food have different levels of a neurotransmitter receptor that has been linked with intelligence in humans, according to a new study. The findings could provide insight into the evolutionary mechanis

Greenland glaciers' varied vulnerability to melting

Using data from NASA missions observing Earth, researchers have created new maps of the bed topography beneath a score of glaciers in southeast Greenland, thereby gaining a much better understanding of why some are undergoing rapid retreat and others are rela

Researchers link defects in a nuclear receptor in the brain to autism spectrum disorders

Researchers link autism spectrum disorders to defects in a nuclear receptor inside the brain.

Laser-heated nanowires produce micro-scale nuclear fusion

Nuclear fusion, the process that powers our sun, happens when nuclear reactions between light elements produce heavier ones. It's also happening -- at a smaller scale -- in a lab. Using a compact but powerful laser to heat arrays of ordered nanowires, scienti

Existence of new form of electronic matter

Researchers have produced a 'human scale' demonstration of a new phase of matter called quadrupole topological insulators that was recently predicted using theoretical physics. These are the first experimental findings to validate this theory.

Coral reef experiment shows: Acidification from carbon dioxide slows growth

Ocean acidification will severely impair coral reef growth before the end of the century if carbon dioxide emissions continue unchecked. The paper represents the first ocean acidification experiment in which seawater was made artificially acidic by the additi

Research gets closer to producing revolutionary battery to power renewable energy industry

New research verges on development of a commercial hydrogen-bromine flow battery, an advanced industrial-scale battery design engineers have strived to develop since the 1960s.

ADHD drugs increase brain glutamate, predict positive emotion in healthy people

New findings offer clues about how misused drugs affect healthy brains and hint at an undiscovered link between glutamate and mood.

A brewer's tale of proteins and beer

The transformation of barley grains into beer is an old story, typically starring water, yeast and hops. Now scientists are highlighting another character in this tale: proteins. The results could someday lead to a better, tastier brew.

Vision's role in vowel perception

Researchers found that the motion and configuration of a speaker's lips are key components of the information people gather when distinguishing vowels in speech.

Cells stressed out? Make mitochondria longer

Scientists investigate a phenomenon that may guard against disease as we age.

Chemists use abundant, low-cost and non-toxic elements to synthesize semiconductors

Chemists have synthesized a new material for semiconductors. The chemists think the material will work well in solar cells, but without the toxicity, scarcity or costs of other semiconductors.
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