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The science of sustainability

Can humans drive economic growth, meet rising demand for food, energy and water, and make significant environmental progress? The short answer is 'yes,' but it comes with several big 'ifs.' New research shows that we can put the world on a path to sustainabil

Sex or food? Decision-making in single-cell organisms

Unicellular diatoms are able to adapt their behavior to different external stimuli based on an evaluation of their own needs. In experiments, Seminavis robusta diatoms directed their orientation either towards nutrient sources or mating partners, depending o

Letting nature take its course: Wolves in Yellowstone National Park

Since the reintroduction of wolves to Yellowstone National Park in 1995, the park's ecosystem has become a deeply complex and heterogeneous system, aided by a strategy of minimal human intervention. The new study is a synthesis of 40 years of research on larg

Renewable energy is common ground for Democrats and Republicans

While conservatives and liberals tend to disagree on many environmental issues, they both view the development of solar power and other forms of renewable energy as financially savvy and a step towards self-sufficiency.

A selfish gene makes mice into migrants

House mice carrying a specific selfish supergene move from one population to another much more frequently than their peers. This finding shows for the first time that a gene of this type can influence animal migratory behavior. It could help in dealing with i

Innuendo alone can fuel conspiracy theories

Innuendo alone in news coverage can fuel belief in conspiracy theories, according to a new study.

Do lovers always tease each other? Study shows how couples handle laughter and banter

How partners in a romantic relationship deal with laughter or being laughed at affects their everyday life, their relationship satisfaction and even their sexuality.

3D imaging opens door to better understanding of fascinating leaf complexity

Leading biologists launch global rallying cry to overhaul theoretical models of carbon-water exchange and photosynthesis using 3D imaging.

Guidelines for a standardized data format for use in cross-linguistic studies

An international team of researchers has set out a proposal for new guidelines on cross-linguistic data formats, in order to facilitate sharing and data comparisons between the growing number of large linguistic databases worldwide. This format provides a sof

New way to determine whether metastatic cancer cells in breast cancer patients are dormant or soon to turn deadly

For the first time ever, researchers have identified a protein as a marker that can indicate whether a cancer patient will develop a recurrence of lethal, metastatic cancer.

Top athletes weigh in on perceived effectiveness of anti-doping measures

Doping remains an ongoing problem in competitive sports, but researchers have never before asked athletes to rank the effectiveness of available anti-doping strategies. A new poll of a national pool of top German cyclists and field athletes finds that, accord

Marker may help target treatments for Crohn's patients

Crohn's disease has emerged as a global disease, with rates steadily increasing over the last 50 years. Experts have long suspected that CD likely represents a collection of related but slightly different disorders, but until now it has not been possible to p

Best use of wildflowers to benefit crops on farms

For the first time, a new study of strawberry crops on New York farms tested this theory and found that wildflower strips on farms added pollinators when the farm lay within a ''Goldilocks zone,'' where 25 to 55 percent of the surrounding area contained natur

Us vs. them: Understanding the neurobiology of stereotypes

Scientists describe how non-invasive brain stimulation -- a technique he and others have pioneered to unlock the secrets of the brain -- could shed light on the neurobiology underlying implicit bias.

Eating with your eyes: Virtual reality can alter taste

Humans not only relish the sweet, savory and saltiness of foods, but they are influenced by the environment in which they eat. Food scientists used virtual reality to show how people's perception of real food can be altered by their surroundings.

Why tropical forests are so ecologically diverse

The population of a tropical tree increases mostly in places where it is rare, a new study found.

How beetle larvae thrive on carrion

The burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides buries the cadavers of small animals to use them as a food source for its offspring. However, the carcass is susceptible to microbial decomposition. Researchers show that the beetles replace harmful microorganisms w

Technique quickly identifies extreme event statistics

Engineers have developed an algorithm that quickly pinpoints the types of extreme events that are likely to occur in a complex system, such as an ocean environment, where waves of varying magnitudes, lengths, and heights can create stress and pressure on a sh

Psychopaths in the C-Suite?

The seemingly never-ending stream of corporate scandals over the past decades, from Enron to Theranos, suggests that something is rotten in corporate leaders. Many place the blame on psychopaths, who are characteristically superficially charming but lack empa

Cesarean-born mice show altered patterns of brain development, study finds

Cesarean-born mice show altered patterns of cell death across the brain, exhibiting greater nerve cell death than vaginally delivered mice in at least one brain area, a finding that suggests birth mode may have acute effects on human neurodevelopment that ma

Mammals cannot evolve fast enough to escape current extinction crisis

The sixth mass extinction is underway, this time caused by humans. A team of researchers have calculated that species are dying out so quickly that nature's built-in defense mechanism, evolution, cannot keep up. If current conservation efforts are not improve

New immunotherapy targeting blood-clotting protein

A team has developed an antibody that blocks the inflammatory and oxidative activity of fibrin, which contributes to neurodegeneration in the brain, without compromising the protein's clotting function.

High entropy alloys hold the key to studying dislocation avalanches in metals

For decades researchers have studied materials from structures to see why and how they fail. Before catastrophic failure, there are individual cracks or dislocations that form, which are signals that a structure may be weakening. While researchers have studie

Arctic sea ice decline driving ocean phytoplankton farther north

A new study reveals phytoplankton spring blooms in the Arctic Ocean, which were previously nonexistent, are expanding northward at a rate of one degree of latitude per decade. Although blooms did not previously occur in this area, phytoplankton were present i

Scientists chase mystery of how dogs process words

Experimental results suggest that dogs have at least a rudimentary neural representation of meaning for words they have been taught, differentiating words they have heard before from those they have not.

New model helps define optimal temperature and pressure to forge nanoscale diamonds

To forge nanodiamonds, which have potential applications in medicine, optoelectronics and quantum computing, researchers expose organic explosive molecules to powerful detonations in a controlled environment. These explosive forces, however, make it difficul

Mouse shows potential as an animal model of decision-making

Mice can be used to study the neural circuits underlying complex decision-making, suggests an analysis of more than 500,000 mouse decisions.

How the human brain detects, identifies, and acts on taste

Sweet and bitter flavors are identified as soon as they are tasted, according to human neural and behavioral data. The study provides new insight into how the brain rapidly detects and discriminates between potentially nutritious and toxic substances.

Study points to possible new therapy for hearing loss

Researchers have taken an important step toward what may become a new approach to restore the hearing loss. In a new study scientists have been able to regrow the sensory hair cells found in the cochlea -- a part of the inner ear -- that converts sound vibrat

Sea snail shells dissolve in increasingly acidified oceans

Shelled marine creatures living in increasingly acidified oceans face a fight for survival as the impacts of climate change spread, a new study suggests.

Feminine leadership traits: Nice but expendable frills?

The first study to examine tradeoffs in masculine versus feminine leadership traits reveals that stereotypically feminine traits -- like being tolerant and cooperative -- are viewed as desirable but ultimately superfluous add-ons. Instead, both men and women

Males have greater reproductive success if they spend more time taking care of kids

Males have greater reproductive success if they spend more time taking care of kids -- and not necessarily only their own, according to new research.

Many cases of dementia may arise from non-inherited DNA 'spelling mistakes'

Only a small proportion of cases of dementia are thought to be inherited -- the cause of the vast majority is unknown. Now a team of scientists believe they may have found an explanation: spontaneous errors in our DNA that arise as cells divide and reproduce.

Sound, vibration recognition boost context-aware computing

Smart devices can seem dumb if they don't understand what's happening around them. Researchers say environmental awareness can be enhanced by analyzing sound and vibrations. The researchers report about two approaches -- one that uses the ubiquitous microphon

Survey shows widespread skepticism of flu shot

The consensus among medical professionals is that the flu shot is safe and is the most effective tool we have in preventing the flu, but a new national survey that a shocking number of parents are still skeptical about the safety and effectiveness of the flu

Cells' route in response to disease is not always straight

The steps cells take in response to challenges are more complex than previously thought, finds new research. The study investigates a system relevant to cancer, viral infection, and diabetes.

Fast, accurate estimation of the Earth's magnetic field for natural disaster detection

Researchers have applied machine-learning techniques to achieve fast, accurate estimates of local geomagnetic fields using data taken at multiple observation points, potentially allowing detection of changes caused by earthquakes and tsunamis. A deep neural n

Scientists achieve first ever acceleration of electrons in plasma waves

Researchers have demonstrated a new technique for accelerating electrons to very high energies over short distances.

A new study indicates the possibility to monitor the progression of Alzheimer's disease by monitoring major brain antioxidant levels using noninvasive techniques

In a breakthrough human study, anti-oxidant, glutathione (GSH), which protects the brain from stress, has been found to be significantly depleted in Alzheimer's patients compared to normal subjects. As GSH is a very important anti-oxidant that protects the br

Microfluidic molecular exchanger helps control therapeutic cell manufacturing

Researchers have demonstrated an integrated technique for monitoring specific biomolecules -- such as growth factors -- that could indicate the health of living cell cultures produced for the burgeoning field of cell-based therapeutics.
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