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Repellent research: Navy developing ship coatings to reduce fuel, energy costs

It can repel water, oil, alcohol and even peanut butter. And it might save the US Navy millions of dollars in ship fuel costs, reduce the amount of energy that vessels consume and improve operational efficiency.

New research on avian response to wildfires

New research explores the effects fire has on ecosystems and the wildlife species that inhabit them. Scientists examined the impacts of fires of different severity levels on birds and how that changes as the time since fire increases. Scientists looked acros

'Stealth' material hides hot objects from infrared eyes

Infrared cameras are the heat-sensing eyes that help drones find their targets even in the dead of night or through heavy fog. Hiding from such detectors could become much easier, thanks to a new cloaking material that renders objects -- and people -- practic

Dynamic modeling helps predict the behaviors of gut microbes

A new study provides a platform for predicting how microbial gut communities work and represents a first step toward understanding how to manipulate the properties of the gut ecosystem. This could allow scientists to, for example, design a probiotic that pers

Uncovering lost images from the 19th century

Art curators will be able to recover images on daguerreotypes, the earliest form of photography that used silver plates, after a team of scientists learned how to use light to see through degradation that has occurred over time.

Challenging our understanding of how platelets are made

Correlative light-electron microscopy is being used to increase our knowledge of how platelets are made in the body and the results are challenging previously held understandings.

The photoelectric effect in stereo

In the photoelectric effect, a photon ejects an electron from a material. Researchers have now used attosecond laser pulses to measure the time evolution of this effect in molecules. From their results they can deduce the exact location of a photoionization e

Accurate measurements of sodium intake confirm relationship with mortality

Eating foods high in salt is known to contribute to high blood pressure, but does that linear relationship extend to increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death? Recent cohort studies have contested that relationship, but a new study using multiple mea

Our intestinal microbiome influences metabolism -- through the immune system

The innate immune system, our first line of defense against bacterial infection, has a side job that's equally important: fine-tuning our metabolism.

'Antifreeze' molecules may stop and reverse damage from brain injuries

The key to better treatments for brain injuries and disease may lie in the molecules charged with preventing the clumping of specific proteins associated with cognitive decline and other neurological problems, researchers report.

Scientists discover how brain signals travel to drive language performance

Using transcranial magnetic stimulation and network control theory, researchers have taken a novel approach to understanding how signals travel across the brain's highways and how stimulation can lead to better cognitive function.

Writing away the body image blues

Body dissatisfaction among women is widespread and can lead to a number of worrisome outcomes, including eating disorders, depression and anxiety. While researchers know a lot about what makes women's body image worse, they are still short on empirically supp

Chemists teach an enzyme a new trick, with potential for building new molecules

Chemists have found a way to make a naturally occurring enzyme take on a new, artificial role, which has significant implications for modern chemistry, including pharmaceutical production.

Researchers create matchmaking service, for peptides and antibiotics

Researchers have matched small proteins, called peptides, with antibiotics so they can work together to combat hard-to-treat infections that don't respond well to drugs on their own.

New clues to improving chemotherapies

The work has important implications for understanding how human cancer cells develop resistance to natural product-based chemotherapies.

Mice not only experience regret, but also learn to avoid it in the future

New research has discovered that mice are capable of learning to plan ahead in order to avoid regret down the road even if there is no additional gain in rewards.

How snowshoe hares evolved to stay seasonally camouflaged

Many animals have evolved fur or feather colors to blend in with the environment and hide from predators. But how do animals stay camouflaged when their environment changes with each new season? For snowshoe hares, hybridization plays an important role in the

Engineering bacteria to exhibit stochastic Turing patterns

A new study has brought science one step closer to a molecular-level understanding of how patterns form in living tissue. The researchers engineered bacteria that, when incubated and grown, exhibited stochastic Turing patterns: a 'lawn' of synthesized bacteri

Nearly 80 exoplanet candidates identified in record time

Scientists have analyzed data from K2, the follow-up mission to NASA's Kepler Space Telescope, and have discovered a trove of possible exoplanets amid some 50,000 stars. The scientists report the discovery of nearly 80 new planetary candidates, including a pa

Higher body fat linked to lower breast cancer risk in younger women

An analysis has linked higher body mass index, or BMI, to lower breast cancer risk for younger women, even for women within a normal weight range.

Reversing way potassium channels work from bacteria to human

Research develops a better understanding of and exerts an unparalleled control of protein molecules.

More evidence for controversial theory that herpesviruses play role in Alzheimer's disease

In a large-scale analysis, researchers use data from three different brain banks to suggest that human herpesviruses are more abundant in the brains of Alzheimer's patients and may play a role in regulatory genetic networks that are believed to lead to the di

How do horses read human emotional cues?

Scientists demonstrated for the first time that horses integrate human facial expressions and voice tones to perceive human emotion, regardless of whether the person is familiar or not.

Scientists print sensors on gummi candy

Microelectrodes can be used for direct measurement of electrical signals in the brain or heart. These applications require soft materials, however. With existing methods, attaching electrodes to such materials poses significant challenges. A team has now succ

Alzheimer's breakthrough: Brain metals that may drive disease progression revealed

Alzheimer's disease could be better treated, thanks to a breakthrough discovery of the properties of the metals in the brain involved in the progression of the neurodegenerative condition.

New World Atlas of Desertification shows unprecedented pressure on planet's resources

The World Desertification Atlas by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre provides the first comprehensive, evidence-based assessment of land degradation at a global level and highlights the urgency to adopt corrective measures.

One year of school comes with an IQ bump, meta-analysis shows

A year of schooling leaves students with new knowledge, and it also equates with a small but noticeable increase to students' IQ, according to a systematic meta-analysis.

No evidence that vitamin D protects against high blood pressure in pregnancy

There is no strong evidence that vitamin D protects against pregnancy-induced high blood pressure (hypertension) or pre-eclampsia, conclude researchers today.

Many wildlife-vehicle collisions preventable

A new study has found that Ontario could save millions by implementing simple measures to help prevent vehicle accidents involving wildlife.

New study debunks Dale Carnegie advice to 'put yourself in their shoes'

The researchers debunk the theories canonized in Dale Carnegie's How to Win Friends and Influence People that assuming you understand someone else's thoughts, feelings, attitude, or mental state is a correct approach to interpersonal insight.

Novel therapy makes oxidative stress deadly to cancer

Oxidative stress can help tumors thrive, but one way novel cancer treatments work is by pushing levels to the point where it instead helps them die, scientists report.

Discovery of 12-sided silica cages

Scientists report the discovery of 10-nanometer, individual, self-assembled dodecahedral structures -- 12-sided silica cages that could have applications in mesoscale material assembly, as well as medical diagnosis and therapeutics.

When cozying up with would-be predators, cleaner shrimp follow a dependable script

It's a mystery how cleaner shrimp partner with would-be fish predators -- sometimes even climbing in their mouths -- without getting eaten. A new study reveals how the shrimp convinces fish not to eat them, and the fish conveys that it's a friend and not a fo

Boring barnacles prefer the shallow life on coral reefs

Scientists have quantified how barnacles infest stony coral over a variety of conditions and reduce calcium carbonate on reefs. Coral reefs harbor diverse marine life and help prevent coastal erosion.

Rhesus macaque model offers route to study Zika brain pathology

Rhesus macaque monkeys infected in utero with Zika virus develop similar brain pathology to human infants. The findings may open up new ways to study the infection in an animal model.

A mix of in-person and online learning may boost student performance, reduce anxiety

Before online learning existed, the traditional lecture was the only option for college courses. Students who skipped class risked missing valuable information. Researchers found that online content accompanied by weekly class meetings -- a 'blended' course f

The cells that control the formation of fat

A study has revealed a new cell type that resides in the body's fat depots where it can actively suppress fat cell formation. This discovery was made using single-cell transcriptomics and opens entirely new avenues to combat obesity and related diseases such

Gas flow through tiny atonically flat walls: Atomic-scale ping-pong

New experiments have shed more light on the gas flow through tiny, angstrom-sized channels with atomically flat walls.

Neonics are being ingested by free-ranging animals

University of Guelph researchers found residues of the insecticides in the livers of wild turkeys, providing evidence that this common agrochemical is being ingested by free-ranging animals.

Better model of water under extreme conditions could aid understanding of Earth's mantle

A team of scientists ran quantum simulations to develop a new model of the behavior of water at extremely high temperatures and pressures. The computational measurements should help scientists understand water's role in the makeup of the mantle and potentiall
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