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The Montmaurin-La Niche mandible reveals the complexity of the Neanderthals’ origin

A team of scientists has examined the Middle Pleistocene Montmaurin-La Niche mandible, which reveals the complexity of the origin of the Neanderthals.

Digitally preserving important Arkansas dinosaur tracks

Researchers used LiDAR imaging to digitally preserve and study important dinosaur tracks.

New process could slash energy demands of fertilizer, nitrogen-based chemicals

Nitrogen-based synthetic fertilizer forms the backbone of the world food supply, but its manufacture requires a tremendous amount of energy. Now, computer modeling points to a method that could drastically cut the energy needed by using sunlight in the manufa

Can training improve memory, thinking abilities in older adults with cognitive impairment?

A new, first-of-its-kind study was designed to assess whether cognitive training, a medication-free treatment, could improve MCI. Studies show that activities that stimulate your brain, such as cognitive training, can protect against a decline in your mental

Are amoebae safe harbors for plague?

Amoebae, single-celled organisms common in soil, water and grade-school science classrooms, may play a key role in the survival and spread of deadly plague bacteria. New research shows that plague bacteria, Yersinia pestis, not only survive, but thrive and re

Rates of great earthquakes not affected by moon phases, day of year

There is an enduring myth that large earthquakes tend to happen during certain phases of the Moon or at certain times during the year. But a new analysis confirms that this bit of earthquake lore is incorrect.

In chronic disease care, family helpers are key, but feel left out

People with diabetes, heart failure and other chronic diseases often live independent lives, without a traditional caregiver. But many have a family member or friend who plays a key supporting role in their health care.

New treatment target for melanoma identified

Researchers have identified a new therapeutic target for the treatment of melanoma. For decades, research has associated female sex and a history of previous pregnancy with better outcomes after a melanoma diagnosis. Now, a research team says it may have dete

High performance CNT catalyst relating to its electroconductivity

Biofuels were obtained from Jatropha Oil using carbon nanotube (CNT) catalyst, which showed efficient cracking activity. The performance was activated by the high stability, metal sites, acid sites, electroconductivity, and coking tolerance of CNT. Two cracki

Being bilingual may help autistic children

Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) often have a hard time switching gears from one task to another. But being bilingual may actually make it a bit easier for them to do so, according to a new study.

How massive can neutron stars be?

Astrophysicists set a new limit for the maximum mass of neutron stars: It cannot exceed 2.16 solar masses.

Youth using alternative tobacco products are more likely to smoke one year later

Nonsmoking adolescents who use e-cigarettes, smokeless tobacco or tobacco water pipes are more likely to start smoking conventional cigarettes within a year, according to new research.

Remote-controlled cancer immunotherapy system

A team of researchers has developed an ultrasound-based system that can non-invasively and remotely control genetic processes in live immune T cells so that they recognize and kill cancer cells.

Potential brain-machine interface for hand paralysis

A brain-machine interface that combines brain stimulation with a robotic device controlling hand movement increases the output of pathways connecting the brain and spinal cord, according to a study of healthy adults. This work could have implications for rest

Solar fuels: better efficiency using microwires

Researchers have made significant efficiency improvements to the technology used to generate solar fuels. This involves the direct conversion of energy from sunlight into a usable fuel (in this case, hydrogen). Using only earth-abundant materials, they develo

Unexpected environmental source of methane discovered

Roughly 10 percent of nitrogen-fixing microorganisms contain the genetic code for manufacturing a back-up enzyme, called iron iron-only nitrogenase, to do their job. New research reveals that this enzyme allows these microorganisms to convert nitrogen gas to

School climate and diversity may affect students’ delinquent behaviors

In a new study, race, sex, perceived peer inclusion, and teacher discrimination were predictors of students’ delinquent behaviors.

Sanchi oil spill contamination could take three months to reach mainland

Water contaminated by the oil currently leaking into the ocean from the Sanchi tanker collision is likely to take at least three months to reach land, and if it does the Korean coast is the most likely location. However, the oil’s fate is highly uncertain,

Microbial signal recognition stems from existing building blocks

Scientists have characterized a protein that enables certain microorganisms to recognize and absorb ammonium in their environment. Ammonium is considered a toxin that pollutes ecosystems - but for these bacteria it represents an important nutrient and energy

Stingray soft robot could lead to bio-inspired robotics

Bioengineers have developed a tissue-based soft robot that mimics the biomechanics of a stingray. The new technology could lead to advances in bio-inspired robotics, regenerative medicine and medical diagnostics.

Surprising discovery could lead to better batteries

Scientists have observed the concentration of lithium inside individual nanoparticles reverse at a certain point, instead of constantly increasing. This discovery is a major step toward improving the battery life of consumer electronics.

New model for uncovering true HIV mortality rates in Zambia

A new study that seeks to better ascertain HIV mortality rates in Zambia could provide a model for improved national and regional surveillance approaches, and ultimately, more effective HIV treatment strategies.

Nanostructure boosts stability of organic thin-film transistors

A nanostructured gate dielectric may have addressed the most significant obstacle to expanding the use of organic semiconductors for thin-film transistors. The structure, composed of a fluoropolymer layer followed by a nanolaminate made from two metal oxide m

Scleroderma study: Hope for a longer life for patients with rare autoimmune disorder

The approach could represent the first new treatment to improve survival in patients with severe scleroderma in more than four decades.

Scarring molecule in fat tissue links obesity with distressed fat

The fat of obese people becomes distressed, scarred and inflamed, which can make weight loss more difficult.

Glucose-induced nerve damage: Research identifies underlying mechanisms

New research has demonstrated that an enzyme she had previously identified as playing a role in peripheral neuropathy induced by cancer chemotherapy also plays a role in peripheral neuropathy caused by diabetes. The significance of the identification of a com

Asthma costs the US economy more than $80 billion per year

Asthma costs the US economy more than $80 billion annually in medical expenses, missed work and school days and deaths, according to new research.

Experts raise concerns over raw meat diets for cats and dogs

Experts are warning dog and cat owners to be aware of the risks associated with feeding their pets raw meat-based diets, instead of the more conventional dry or canned pet foods.

All in the family: Focused genomic comparisons

Aspergillus fungi are pathogens, decomposers, and important sources of biotechnologically-important enzymes. Scientists now report the first outcome from the large-scale sequencing of 300+ Aspergillus species. These findings are a proof of concept of novel me

Tagged tiger shark proving unstoppable

For more than a decade, researchers have been tagging and tracking sharks in order to study their migratory patterns and more. One tiger shark - Andy - is now the longest-ever tracked tiger shark, providing years worth of data for researchers.

Supermassive black hole caught burping — twice

Astronomers have caught a supermassive black hole in a distant galaxy snacking on gas and then "burping" — not once, but twice.

No planets needed for rings around stars: Disk patterns can self-generate

A new study shows rings, arcs and spirals in disks around stars may not be caused by planets. They may self-generate.

Brown dwarfs found sprinkled among newborn stars in Orion Nebula

Astronomers have uncovered the largest known population of brown dwarfs sprinkled among newborn stars in the Orion Nebula.

Biologists peek into the past to see the future through tiny spider eyes

Biologists look to the past for early genetic development of tiny spider and insect eyes to find potential for research into human visual challenges.

Marijuana farms expose spotted owls to rat poison in northwest California

Spotted owls and barred owls are being exposed to high levels of rat poison in northwest California, with illegal marijuana farms the most likely source point, according to a new study. Proposition 64, which legalized recreational marijuana in the state, wen

Multiple sites rich in water ice found on Mars

Erosion on Mars is exposing deposits of water ice, starting at depths as shallow as one to two meters below the surface and extending 100 meters or more.

Biologists create toolkit for tuning genetic circuits

Scientists have created a toolkit for synthetic biologists who need to precisely tune the input and output levels of genetic circuits.

Evolution acceptance in children linked to aptitude, not belief

In contrast to adults, acceptance of evolution in schoolchildren in the UK is linked to their scientific aptitude rather than conflicts with belief systems, say scientists.

Objectification of women results in lack of empathy

Sexualized representations, especially the emphasis of secondary sexual characteristics, can change the way we perceive an individual. Researchers have shown that empathic feelings and brain responses are reduced when we observe the emotions of sexualized wom

Turkey-sized dinosaur from Australia preserved in an ancient log-jam

The partial skeleton of a new species of turkey-sized herbivorous dinosaur has been discovered in 113-million-year-old rocks in southeastern Australia. The fossilized tail and foot bones give new insight into the diversity of small, bipedal herbivorous dinosa
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