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Wiring diagram of the brain provides a clearer picture of brain scan data

Neuroscientists have used data from the human brain connectome -- a publicly available 'wiring diagram' of the human brain based on data from thousands of healthy human volunteers -- to reassess the findings from neuroimaging studies of patients with Alzheime

Jiggly Jell-O to make powerful new hydrogen fuel catalyst

A cheap and effective new catalyst can generate hydrogen fuel from water just as efficiently as platinum, currently the best -- but also most expensive -- water-splitting catalyst out there.The catalyst, which is composed of nanometer-thin sheets of metal car

HIV vaccine protects non-human primates from infection

New research shows that an experimental HIV vaccine strategy works in non-human primates. In the study, rhesus macaque monkeys produced neutralizing antibodies against one strain of HIV that resembles the resilient viral form that most commonly infects people

Early physical therapy can reduce risk, amount of long-term opioid use, study finds

Patients who underwent physical therapy soon after being diagnosed with pain in the shoulder, neck, low back or knee were approximately 7 to 16 percent less likely to use opioids in the subsequent months, according to a new study.

Self-perception and reality seem to line-up when it comes to judging our own personality

When it comes to personality, it turns out your peers probably think the same way about you as you do about yourself.

Can stem cells help a diseased heart heal itself? Researcher achieves important milestone

Scientists have taken an important step toward the goal of making diseased hearts heal themselves -- a new model that would reduce the need for bypass surgery, heart transplants or artificial pumping devices.

For these critically endangered marine turtles, climate change could be a knockout blow

Researchers suggest that projected increases in air temperatures, rainfall inundation and blistering solar radiation could significantly reduce hawksbill hatching success at a selection of major nesting beaches.

Asian glaciers slowed by ice loss, NASA finds

Asia's high mountain glaciers are flowing more slowly in response to widespread ice loss, affecting freshwater availability downstream in India, Pakistan and China, a new study finds.

Mars InSight lander seen in first images from space

On Nov. 26, NASA's InSight mission knew the spacecraft touched down within an 81-mile-long (130-kilometer-long) landing ellipse on Mars. Now, the team has pinpointed InSight's exact location using images from HiRISE, a powerful camera onboard another NASA spa

To repair DNA damage, plants need good contractors

Researchers report which genes are turned on or off, and in which order, to orchestrate the cellular processes required to protect and repair the genome in response to DNA damage. The research reveals the genetic framework controlling a complex biological pro

Protein involved in nematode stress response identified

When humans experience stress, their inner turmoil may not be apparent to an outside observer. But many animals deal with stressful circumstances -- overcrowded conditions, not enough food -- by completely remodeling their bodies. These stress-induced forms,

Genetic marker, predictor of early relapse in pediatric ALL uncovered

Researchers recently discovered that by testing the level of NER (nucleotide excision repair) gene expression, pediatric oncologists can determine the likelihood of early relapse (less than three years) in their acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients.

Mass spectrometry sheds new light on thallium poisoning cold case

In 1994, Chinese university student Zhu Ling began experiencing stomach pain, hair loss and partial paralysis. By the time doctors diagnosed Ling with thallium poisoning about four months later, she was in a coma. Two decades after the poisoning, mass spectro

Fitness instructors' comments shape women's body satisfaction

A new study found that while exercise -- in this case, a 16-minute conditioning class -- generally improved women's mood and body satisfaction, women felt even better if the instructor made motivational comments that focused on strength and health instead of

Novel mechanisms of dengue and Zika virus infections and link to microcephaly

New insights into how dengue and Zika viruses cause disease reveal strategies the viruses use to successfully infect their host and a link to microcephaly.

Neanderthal genes give clues to human brain evolution

A distinctive feature of modern humans is our round (globular) skulls and brains. Researchers report that present-day humans who carry particular Neanderthal DNA fragments have heads that are slightly less rounded, revealing genetic clues to the evolution of

Exercise-induced hormone irisin triggers bone remodeling in mice

Exercise has been touted to build bone mass, but exactly how it actually accomplishes this is a matter of debate. Now, researchers show that an exercise-induced hormone activates cells that are critical for bone remodeling in mice. A study identifies a recept

How the brain tells you to scratch that itch

It's a maddening cycle that has affected us all: it starts with an itch that triggers scratching, but scratching only makes the itchiness worse. Now, researchers have revealed the brain mechanism driving this uncontrollable itch-scratching feedback loop. Rese

How teens deal with stress may affect their blood pressure, immune system

Most teens get stressed out by their families from time to time, but whether they bottle those emotions up or put a positive spin on things may affect certain processes in the body, including blood pressure and how immune cells respond to bacterial invaders,

How particles arrange themselves into complex structures

Complexity in nature, whether in chlorophyll or in living organisms, often results from self-assembly and is considered particularly robust. Compact clusters of elemental particles can be shown to be of practical relevance, and are found in atomic nuclei, nan

Early animals: Death near the shoreline, not life on land

Our understanding of when the very first animals started living on land is helped by identifying trace fossils -- the tracks and trails left by ancient animals -- in sedimentary rocks that were deposited on the continents.

New discovery improves use of optical tweezers

This year's Nobel Prize in Physics, awarded for discoveries in laser physics, recognizes optical tweezers. Now researchers have developed a method that greatly simplifies and improves the use of optical tweezers.

Amyloid pathology transmission in lab mice and historic medical treatments

A study has confirmed that some vials of a hormone used in discontinued medical treatments contained seeds of a protein implicated in Alzheimer's disease, and are able to seed amyloid pathology in mice.

Swarming behavior discovered in fish-dwelling parasite

Researchers have observed a previously unrecognized behavior in a single-celled parasite called Spironucleus vortens, which infects ornamental fish such as angelfish: The protozoans swarm.

Where did the hot Neptunes go? A shrinking planet holds the answer

'Where did the hot Neptunes go?' This is the question astronomers have been asking for a long time, faced with the mysterious absence of planets the size of Neptune. Researchers have just discovered that one of these planets is losing its atmosphere at a fran

Ingestible capsule can be controlled wirelessly

Researchers have designed an ingestible capsule that can be controlled using Bluetooth wireless technology. Their capsule, which can be customized to deliver drugs, sense environmental conditions, or a combination of those functions, can reside in the stomac

The long dry: Why the world's water supply is shrinking

A global study has found a paradox: our water supplies are shrinking at the same time as climate change is generating more intense rain. And the culprit is the drying of soils, say researchers, pointing to a world where drought-like conditions will become th

Barely scratching the surface: A new way to make robust membranes

Researchers have demonstrated a new technique's viability for membranes.

Ritalin drives greater connection between brain areas key to memory, attention

Scientists have described increased connections between key parts of the brains of monkeys who have taken methylphenidate (Ritalin).

Blood test could lead to cystic fibrosis treatment tailored to each patient

Researchers have used a blood test and microarray technology to identify distinct molecular signatures in children with cystic fibrosis. These patterns of gene expression ultimately could help predict disease severity and treatment response, and lead to thera

Researchers design technology that sees nerve cells fire

Researchers have created a noninvasive technology that detects when nerve cells fire based on changes in shape. The method could be used to observe nerve activity in light-accessible parts of the body, such as the eye, which would allow physicians to quantita

Stem cell researchers develop promising technique to generate new muscle cells in lab

To help patients with muscle disorders, scientists have engineered a new stem cell line to study the conversion of stem cells into muscle.

Cardinals living in adjacent deserts are sharply distinct in genetics and song

New research suggests that populations of the Northern Cardinal -- one of the most ubiquitous backyard birds in the United States -- are undergoing speciation in two adjacent deserts. This study, which analyzed genetics and vocal behavior, gives clues about t

How unconventional metals behave, with an eye on high-temperature superconductors

By trapping atoms in a lattice of light, researchers explore how unconventional metals conduct electricity, with an eye toward understanding high-temperature superconductors.

DNA study shows stethoscopes loaded with bacteria, including staphylococcus

Stethoscopes carried by health care practitioners are loaded with diverse bacteria, including some that can cause healthcare-associated infections, according to a study. The research also reviewed the effectiveness of cleaning methods, finding a standardized

Teens get more sleep with later school start time, researchers find

In 2016, Seattle Public Schools pushed back start times for its 18 high schools by 55 minutes. Researchers have now announced that, as a result, teens at two Seattle high schools got more sleep on school nights -- a median increase of 34 minutes of sleep eac

First-ever look at complete skeleton of Thylacoleo, Australia's extinct 'marsupial lion'

Thyalacoleo carnifex, the 'marsupial lion' of Pleistocene Australia, was an adept hunter that got around with the help of a strong tail, according to a new study. These insights come after newly discovered remains, including one nearly complete fossil specime

NASA's InSight takes its first selfie

NASA's InSight lander used a camera on its robotic arm to take its first selfie -- a mosaic made up of 11 images. This is the same imaging process used by NASA's Curiosity rover mission, in which many overlapping pictures are taken and later stitched together

NASA's Juno mission halfway to Jupiter science

On Dec. 21, NASA's Juno spacecraft will be 3,140 miles (5,053 kilometers) above Jupiter's cloud tops and hurtling by at a healthy clip of 128,802 mph (207,287 kilometers per hour). This will mark the solar-powered spacecraft's halfway point in data collectio

Record-wet and record-dry months increased in regions worldwide

More and more rainfall extremes are observed in regions around the globe -- triggering both wet and dry records, a new study shows. Yet there are big differences between regions: The central and Eastern US, northern Europe and northern Asia have experienced h
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