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Architecture & Design

Art Into Architecture: Olafur Eliasson’s 'Fjordenhus'

There’s a sci-fi element to Olafur Eliasson’s first architectural project, Fjordenhus. A building rising from the calm waters of Vejle Fjord in Denmark, it recalls the grandeur of a historical church with its double-height arched windows, which, taken tog
Architecture & Design

Art Into Architecture: Olafur Eliasson’s 'Fjordenhus'

There’s a sci-fi element to Olafur Eliasson’s first architectural project, Fjordenhus. A building rising from the calm waters of Vejle Fjord in Denmark, it recalls the grandeur of a historical church with its double-height arched windows, which, taken together, form undulating lines that surge around the structure, echoed in the subtle waves below. It feels futuristic, composed of four intersecting cylinders, compact pistons of energy. At 28 meters in height, it appears as a towering monolith or an unusual iceberg emerging from the sea. In other words, it’s both recognizable and otherworldly.The artist’s first building, it carries with it his signature investigation of how the body interacts with space and what we sense in the process. Discussing his interest in embodied experience, Eliasson said in an interview: “Many of my works are spatial in their language, but the content is about human perception, the body, and psychology. When I was offered the opportunity to work within architecture, I took the same content — the form was just modified.” He underlined that “a lot of the architectural solutions were solved in the same way as when I make art.”Commissioned by the investment company Kirk Kapital as its new headquarters, Eliasson worked on the building’s design with the architect Sebastian Behmann, with whom he founded the Berlin-based Studio Other Spaces (SOS) in 2014. “For the client it was very important that it had a strong artistic element,” said Eliasson, which led to this being at once an example of architecture, art, and design (even the building’s furniture and lights have been conceptualized by SOS).Behmann described how before collaborating with Eliasson he “felt limited within the profession of architecture to do what I wanted to do. The dialogue between art and architecture allows for a greater vocabulary.”Indeed, for Eliasson, art and architecture are “overlapping” and “can amplify each other,” so that ultimately, “there is an opportunity to give the user the authority to co-produce the narrative of what they experience.”Although a private company, Kirk Kapital agreed that the building’s design should also grant public access to the ground floor. After the viewer crosses over a footbridge, the entrance envelops him or her within a shelter from which to experience the surrounding waters and the rippling light that reflects off its surface. Discussing the challenge of mediating public and private space amid overarching political agendas, Eliasson said: “We live in a time where there’s a lot of interest in promoting fear, populism and polarization. It terrorizes public space into being a more fear-driven space where you’re more likely to reject than include a stranger.”He believes that “art and architecture needs to [apply] the agenda of, if not dismantling those defenses, then exposing the fact that we are tense, stressed, rejecting and defensive. One way of doing that is to use, for instance, organic materials, porous materials that are highly tactile and talk to your sensual skin.”As such, rather than employing hard, cold “rejective” matter such as polished granite, he chose forms that would change with the weather and temperature, where the color would shift when it rains, for example.It was precisely this concept of hybridizing private and public space that influenced the way in which Fjordenhus developed to include an “aesthetic or a non-functional area” on the ground floor, where you’re simply allowed to experience the atmospheric conditions. “For me it was very important that Kirk Capital wanted to give something back to the city,” said Eliasson, continuing, “this public commitment was about their relationship to a sense of belonging; that was inspiring to me.” Initially, it was planned as a destination point at the end of the jetty (which was designed by Gunther Vogt).Discussing the importance of free access, Behmann emphasized: “There are certain types of buildings that ask to be public — town halls or civic buildings — Fjordenhus has some of that shape and meaning. People can spend time there; they don’t have to spend money. They can bring their own drinks and swim.”This issue of public vs. private space is ever intensifying, as property markets continue to boom in major capital cities while public access and human rights diminish. How does this physical reality impact our psychological sense of belonging, our sense of community and inclusivity? Eliasson is interested in “the fact that it’s a struggle to simply claim our sense of belonging to public space. We cannot mistakenly think that public space is just what’s left in between all the different types of private and functionalized space. We forget that you and I own the public space together, we also pay for it through our tax; we shouldn’t deprive public space from its great agency. That agency is the democratic values upon which our society is built.”Behmann, who is interested in architecture from the 1960s and 1970s, has studied how certain civic societies produce specific kinds of public spaces. Citing The Centro Cultural São Paulo as an example (conceived in the 1970s, built in 1982), which was commissioned by the Municipal Cultural Department and placed atop an old railway, conceived to combine offices with a public library, hotels, exhibition spaces, music venues and a shopping center. “Public space is not just empty space and it’s not enough to simply provide space; it must be connected to the society who will use it.”Is a building more valuable if presented as an artwork? Might the property market become conflated with the art market, and if this strengthens the privatization of housing, how will this affect average people and their right to move and exist freely within the urban environment? For Behmann, “Fjordenhus can hopefully make a difference in the perception of what is quality in architecture and in space [in terms of] what it actually means for civic society, the community — for the whole area, and the region. I hope Fjordenhus can be an example of how to create value with its content.” This article appears in the September issue of Modern Painters. http://www.blouinartinfo.com/                              Founder: Louise Blouin   

BAF and Carlo Ratti Win Taiwan National Library Competition

Bio-architecture Formosana (BAF) and Carlo Ratti Architects have won the international competition for the Southern branch of the Taiwan National Library and Repository in Tainan, Taiwan.The design has been selected as the winner of nine competitors. This ne
Architecture & Design

BAF and Carlo Ratti Win Taiwan National Library Competition

Bio-architecture Formosana (BAF) and Carlo Ratti Architects have won the international competition for the Southern branch of the Taiwan National Library and Repository in Tainan, Taiwan.The design has been selected as the winner of nine competitors. This new public building, commissioned by the National Central Library, will accommodate a library, a book museum and a joint archives center. A digital preservation center will serve as the pioneer library in providing preservation service for valuable academic digital materials in Taiwan.“The concept of library as a town was inspired by the humbleness of the context while creating a ‘town’ as part of the town fabric. The main spaces of the library, museum and repository are linked through a main axis connecting the N-S sides of the site bringing people in smoothly into this library town and hoping to be as seamless and effortless as possible to form an integral part of the community. Three main ideas drive the creation of this chance encounter: the integration with nature, the openness of learning and the ‘museumization’ of the library,” BAF says.As a response to the new-age learning environment such as co-learning, open source data sharing and digital networking, the team proposed the future library as a hub of open learning platform and promote collaboration.The main lobby will be an interactive flexible space for learning and events which redefine the traditional ‘see-the-books reading room’ idea. The team have also designed ‘The Agora’ under the solar canopy as a response to the hot and humid town to provide shade and harness energy. The space will be used publicly in any time of the day and for semi-outdoor events overlooking the lush landscape.The team said that the trees are towering within the site and the golden shower tree boulevard is a landmark to community.According to BAF, the site has an existing ecosystem which they would like to preserve and they envision the built environment to coexist harmoniously with the natural environment.The National Library is expected to open to the public in 2023.http://www.blouinartinfo.com/                              Founder: Louise Blouin 

Phillip K. Smith III’s “Detroit Skybridge” is a Rainbow of Moving Colors

“Detroit Skybridge” by Phillip K. Smith III connects two of Detroit’s most iconic buildings, One Woodward and the Guardian Building. The 100 foot long 16th floor skybridge becomes a floating bar of light hovering over the streets of Downtown Detroit.Tak
Architecture & Design

Phillip K. Smith III’s “Detroit Skybridge” is a Rainbow of Moving Colors

“Detroit Skybridge” by Phillip K. Smith III connects two of Detroit’s most iconic buildings, One Woodward and the Guardian Building. The 100 foot long 16th floor skybridge becomes a floating bar of light hovering over the streets of Downtown Detroit.Taking inspiration from the modular white concrete of Yamasaki’s 1962 skyscraper and the mosaic of color within the 1929 Guardian Building, Smith has created a unique color program for this significantly scaled project.Constructed in 1976 by architect Gino Rossetti, the 100 foot long pedestrian bridge allowed the access for Michigan Consolidated Gas (Michcon) and the American Natural Resources Co. (ANR) to move freely, as employees from each company were spread across both the Guardian and the Yamasaki buildings until the late 1990s.Smith has programmed the lights to change in patterns, creating the impression that the hues are moving along the length of the bridge. Single-color bars and rainbow effects are also among the configurations.“Detroit Skybridge is another example of how underutilized spaces can be reimagined for the benefit of the public. Phillip’s use of light and color, along with his understanding of architecture and scale, make this a compelling project for the city,” says Library Street Collective owner Anthony Curis.Smith is best-known for his use of mirrors and colorful lights to create installations, which are often located in the desert landscape near his home and studio in Palm Springs, California. These have included a cabin camouflaged with mirrored bands, an arc of reflective poles, and a collection of light-up blocks at Coachella festival.“This project presents an entirely unique art experience outside of the traditional bounds of the museum or gallery, positioning itself within the public realm for all to experience freely. By day, the Skybridge will continue to be seen as its historical self within the architecture and massing of Downtown. But by night, it will become a beacon for the beauty, creativity, and innovation of Detroit,” says Smith. “I am interested in creating experiences that tap into ‘universal beauty’ — experiences that make us step away from our pattern, our life, our work, our errands, and allow us to see sublime beauty shifting and changing before our eyes.”The project was conceptualized and produced by Library Street Collective. Detroit Skybridge is supported by Bedrock Detroit, Quicken Loans Community Fund and Wayne County.http://www.blouinartinfo.com/                                              Founder: Louise Blouin                                       

Waugh Thistleton Architects and Arup Creates an Interactive Modular Maze-like Installation for London Design Festival 2018

Waugh Thistleton Architects and Arup have collaborated with the American Hardwood Export Council to create an Interactive Modular Maze-like Installation in the Sackler Courtyard at the V&A for London Design Festival 2018.“MultiPly” is a maze-like seri
Architecture & Design

Waugh Thistleton Architects and Arup Creates an Interactive Modular Maze-like Installation for London Design Festival 2018

Waugh Thistleton Architects and Arup have collaborated with the American Hardwood Export Council to create an Interactive Modular Maze-like Installation in the Sackler Courtyard at the V&A for London Design Festival 2018.“MultiPly” is a maze-like series of interconnected spaces that overlap and intertwine designed to encourage visitors to re-think the way we build our homes and cities. The nine-meter high American tulipwood installation leads visitors through a series of stairs, corridors, and open spaces inviting them to explore the potential of wood in architecture.Built from a reusable cross-laminated timber (CLT), the panel system is made of 60cbm of American tulipwood and is permeable in nature. The 43 cubic meter of tulipwood that make up “MultiPly” store the equivalent of 30 tonnes of CO2 and are replaced with the natural growth in the American forest in five minutes.“MultiPly” aims to confront two of the biggest challenges — the need for housing and the urgency to fight climate change — and presents the fusion of modular systems and sustainable construction materials as a possible solution.Director Andrew Waugh says it will show that modular architecture can provide not only efficient solutions but also enjoyable experiences: “The structure will lead people a merry dance up and down staircases and across bridges exploring space and light.”Waugh Thistleton joins an illustrious list of architects who have collaborated with AHEC and Arup on Landmark Projects for LDF.“Waugh Thistleton has been pioneering innovative uses of wood in construction for decades,” says David Venables, AHEC’s European Director. “‘MultiPly’ explores a new, more sustainable way of building, bringing together a readily available carbon-negative material — American tulipwood — with modular design.”“There is increasing topical discourse on the use of CLT as a material of choice for commercial and residential development. ‘MultiPly’ provides a fabulous opportunity to showcase how advances in timber technology, together with a focus on modularity and efficiency, means we should embrace timber for future developments,” adds Carolina Bartram, Lead Project Director at Arup.Waugh Thistleton has experience in delivering a wide range of building types, including affordable housing, private residential projects, offices and commercial spaces, and mixed-use, cultural and leisure. The quality of our buildings and our commitment to the use of timber construction has earned us an international reputation in environmentally sustainable architecture and design.http://www.blouinartinfo.com/                                              Founder: Louise Blouin 

Giles Miller’s Immersive Installation “Byplace” for South East Makers Club

South East Makers Club will showcase “Byplace,” an immersive installation by Deptford-based design company Giles Miller Studio and fabricators Aldworth James & Bond at the London Design Festival 2018.Celebrating the marriage between design and making
Architecture & Design

Giles Miller’s Immersive Installation “Byplace” for South East Makers Club

South East Makers Club will showcase “Byplace,” an immersive installation by Deptford-based design company Giles Miller Studio and fabricators Aldworth James & Bond at the London Design Festival 2018.Celebrating the marriage between design and making, the large-scale sculptural structure “Byplace” plays on density and perspective, drawing on Giles Miller Studio’s award-winning aesthetic.Situated at the peak of Deptford Market Yard’s historic train carriage ramp, the installation features a series of screens made out of interlocking strips of birch plywood. The strips were all created using a CNC cutting machine, and each one comprises of small circles connected along a central axis.“One of the joys of South East Makers Club is meeting the talented designers, makers, and businesses that are based here. There is a genuine shared desire to work together, to collaborate and help one another to realise bold ideas, and perhaps uniquely, to have fun doing it! Bringing together two local practices, Giles Miller Studio and Aldworth James & Bond, with a shared desire to build and craft with skill and precision, has been a joy. Both companies have been totally enthusiastic about showcasing their work in Deptford. We couldn’t have done it without the backing and support from Deptford Market Yard, who have believed in the project from the outset. Nor could we have done it without Shockledge who are lending their expertise and DHH Timber for the material supply. This is a fine example of collaboration at its best,” Helen Osgerby, Co-Founder, South East Makers Club says.The project is supported by Deptford Market Yard, structural engineering specialists Shockledge and material sponsors DHH Timber.“This architectural sculpture is an experiment in density and perspective, and working in such a collaborative way has enabled us to evolve our thinking in the area of architecture and continue to question how space can be physically defined. The project demonstrates perfectly the fusion of digital and technological design with the hands-on process of making, enabled by Aldworth James & Bond and their fantastic team,” says Giles Miller, Founder, Giles Miller Studio.http://www.blouinartinfo.com/                              Founder: Louise Blouin                                                      

Moritz Waldemeyer’s Dazzling Lighting Installation for Focus/18

Focus/18 at Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour is the design event for excellence, taking place from September 19-21, during the London Design Festival. This year, a new work by international artist Moritz Waldemeyer has been specially commissioned for the show t
Architecture & Design

Moritz Waldemeyer’s Dazzling Lighting Installation for Focus/18

Focus/18 at Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour is the design event for excellence, taking place from September 19-21, during the London Design Festival. This year, a new work by international artist Moritz Waldemeyer has been specially commissioned for the show to enhance visitor experience.Taking inspiration from coronas, the crown-like appearance around the sun during an eclipse, advanced LED technology will light up a kaleidoscope of colorways as visitors move back and forth along a 12-metre walkway. The highly interactive installation invites visitors to choose their favourite colors from the new collections which can be projected as specific auras.“In homage to Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour’s famous architecture and light-filled domes, an innovative concept for Focus/18, will explore the way we look at colour with a mesmerising work of constantly transmuting beauty,” states Design Centre.The installation will celebrate indirect illumination, providing an engaging experience of light, color, and movement.The Design Centre believes that in an increasingly fast-paced world, color informs the aesthetic, both consciously and subconsciously. Particular palettes influence mood, evoke memories or simply reflect what we like and who we are.Visitors are asked to pause, interact, and enjoy this positive space during Focus/18.Claire German, Managing Director of Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour, says: “As a nerve centre of many forms of creative expression, we are proud to commission this ground-breaking work of art from Moritz Waldemeyer and present it to the public for the first time at Focus/18.”London-based, Waldemeyer’s studio is driven by playful experimentation, developed through forging links between technology, art, fashion, and design. This approach has resulted in creative collaborations in the past with leading names including U2, Rihanna, Versace, Jamiroquai, Cirque de Soleil, and Philip Treacy.At Focus/18 at Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour, visitors can get the inside track at talks, demonstrations, workshops, and discovery tours; meet established makers, emerging innovators, and skilled artisans; listen to star names sharing their creative narratives at the ‘Conversations in Design’ series; and connect with influencers and tastemakers from 120 showrooms and 600+ international brands.http://www.blouinartinfo.com/                              Founder: Louise Blouin  

“New Forms of French Modernity” at Demisch Danant, New York

Demisch Danant in New York is hosting an exhibition featuring the influential work of Jacques Dumond and Joseph-Andre Motte in the 1950s and early 1960s and their exploration of new materials in post-war society.Demisch Danant in New York hosts “New Forms o
Architecture & Design

“New Forms of French Modernity” at Demisch Danant, New York

Demisch Danant in New York is hosting an exhibition featuring the influential work of Jacques Dumond and Joseph-Andre Motte in the 1950s and early 1960s and their exploration of new materials in post-war society.Demisch Danant in New York hosts “New Forms of French Modernity” featuring the influential work of Jacques Dumond and Joseph-Andre Motte, on view through October 27, 2018.According to the gallery, the continuance of modernity in France after World War II was promoted by a generation of designers through Minimalist style and a proposal of a new postwar lifestyle after the Reconstruction; ornament was rejected in order to support the most simple and efficient concepts in furniture.Jacques Dumond is considered a leader of the French Modernist Movement—exemplifying Minimalism, Functionalism, and a reduc­tive approach towards ornamentation. As an educator, he exerted a tremen­dous influence on the next generation of young designers.Working often for private clients, Dumond’s deep knowledge of fine craftsmanship, elegant understanding of color and proportion, and experimentation with materials are signature elements of his originality.He influenced a generation of young designers cultivating their talents by employing them in his studio, provoking them as a professor at Ecole Camondo and the Ecole Nationale Superieure des Arts Decoratifs, and serving as vice president of Societe des Artistes Decorateurs.“Joseph-Andre Motte is one of the most substantial postwar French Modern designers. Motte remains a feature of everyday French life through his large-scale designs of public spaces throughout the country. His works cascade through venues as regal as the Louvre and as quotidian as the Parisian metro,” the gallery says.A figurehead of the French Modern Movement, Motte was frequently com­missioned by the French administration to participate in grand public projects including the interiors of hundreds of metro stations in Paris — his chairs re­maining functional pinnacles of Parisian life throughout the subway stations.Motte experimented widely with wood, stainless steel, Formica, and plastics. The variety of these materials reflected a desire to humanize the spaces he worked in, particularly as the use of concrete and other typically cold sub­stances became fashionable in architecture.According to the gallery, Motte’s work represents the intersection of beauty and functionality in the face of an industrial society.The exhibition is on view through October 27, 2018 at Demisch Danant, 30 W, 12th St, New York, USA.For details, visit: http://www.demischdanant.com/Click on the slideshow for a sneak peek at the exhibition.              http://www.blouinartinfo.com/                              Founder: Louise Blouin                                                      

Studio MUTT Designs “Out of Character” for London Design Festival 2018

London-based Studio Mutt has designed four architectural characters that inhabit the Sir John Soane's Museum as part of London Design Festival 2018.“Out of Character” features four mixed-media installations designed to represent fictional characters —
Architecture & Design

Studio MUTT Designs “Out of Character” for London Design Festival 2018

London-based Studio Mutt has designed four architectural characters that inhabit the Sir John Soane's Museum as part of London Design Festival 2018.“Out of Character” features four mixed-media installations designed to represent fictional characters — a lawyer, an architect, a monk, and a magician. The characters have been designed to depict a possible inhabitant of the museum before John Soane moved in.Studio MUTT has designed the characters based on a text from 1812 by John Soane. “Crude Hints towards an History of my House,” a strange and perplexing text in which he imagined his home as a ruin centuries in the future, inspected by visitors who speculate on its origins and function.“The four characters are installed as ‘inhabitants’ in different locations in the Museum. Soane’s original manuscript of the Crude Hints text is being displayed in the Foyle Space, alongside a series of large banners, each illustrating the peculiar and fantastical narratives behind the characters,” the studio says. The characters have been designed taking cue from the brightly colored, rich in decoration, and drawing from the wealth of source material in the Museum and Soane’s work.MUTT is an architecture studio founded by Graham Burn, James Crawford, and Alexander Turner, with roots in London and Liverpool. The underlying mission of the studio is to create characterful projects which are unique, specific, and joyful. They work at all scales, from a teacup to a tower, to make everyday life better.MUTT believes in engaging with the world as it exists and rejecting the concept of radical newness, instead adopting referencing and sampling as a solution to contemporary issues. They draw inspiration and ideas from urban, historical, and social analysis to create a backdrop, not a background, to everyday life.http://www.blouinartinfo.com/                              Founder: Louise Blouin 

Jesse Visser’s Triptych ‘Cogitatio inanis’ at Enlightened Design III

Jesse Visser will present imposing monumental limited editions: triptychs — of which the largest is 1.65 meters high and 2.30 meters wide — as part of Enlightened Design III for London Design Festival.On view from September 19 through September 22, t
Architecture & Design

Jesse Visser’s Triptych ‘Cogitatio inanis’ at Enlightened Design III

Jesse Visser will present imposing monumental limited editions: triptychs — of which the largest is 1.65 meters high and 2.30 meters wide — as part of Enlightened Design III for London Design Festival.On view from September 19 through September 22, the huge narrative works suggest triptychs with wood-painted panels from a medieval church but are contemporary and daring lighting designs made of solid high-polished brass and stainless-steel plates. The triptychs consist of folding shutters behind which lie reflective panels with round circular lights or, in the other version, two tube lights that shed and reflect an atmospheric light.Visser, in search for new production techniques and innovative materials, has developed a preference for tactile materials in which the processing of the surface plays a role. Visser looks in the minutest of the detailing just as for this modern triptych, the designer developed solid turned hinges of brass or stainless steel with which the hatches can be opened.The designer believes that the functional lighting artwork is not finished until a user performs the required action: the opening and closing of the shutters.The designer will also showcase his bright and robust lamps that were recently included in the Hollands Licht collection: the golden chandelier and wall lamp from the King Arthur series of laser-cut aluminium form minimalist translations of a medieval chandelier.‘Jesse Visser Designprojects’ is a Amsterdam based design studio established by designer Jesse Visser in 2000. He enjoys various collaborations with labels, craftsmen, product-developers, industry- and other creative thinkers. A part of his designs are created in partnership with designer brands or as custom pieces for architects. On his own initiative, he creates in-house productions and special limited edition pieces.The labels Visser works for are predominantly focussing on furniture and lighting design. He is strongly involved by the process of product-development. Searching for new production techniques, innovative materials, finding the best solution that will bring the product to a higher level. He challenges himself to break down a product to its essence and then built it up with as few resources as possible, which result in functional high end pieces.http://www.blouinartinfo.com/                              Founder: Louise Blouin  

David/Nicolas “Supernova” at Carpenters Workshop Gallery, Paris

At its Paris venue, “Supernova” by Lebanese designer-duo David/Nicolas is on view at Paris-based Carpenters Workshop Gallery.“Supernova,” the inaugural exhibition at Carpenters Workshop Gallery by David/Nicolas brings two distinct bodies of work that
Architecture & Design

David/Nicolas “Supernova” at Carpenters Workshop Gallery, Paris

At its Paris venue, “Supernova” by Lebanese designer-duo David/Nicolas is on view at Paris-based Carpenters Workshop Gallery.“Supernova,” the inaugural exhibition at Carpenters Workshop Gallery by David/Nicolas brings two distinct bodies of work that explore different sides of the pair’s multi-faceted practice: Constellation and Monocle, each an interpretation of a post-explosion phenomenon.The Monocle series is centered around the representation of large masses of dense matter. Featuring material such wood, marble and bronze juxtaposed against transparent glass, referencing the equilibrium of mass and light in a star.The Constellation series finds inspiration in the new life of a star and the explosion phenomenon. These pieces revolve around the relativity of perception and how such a phenomenon can be interpreted into palpable matter. Low tables rendered in travertine feature clean lines and undisturbed surfaces that are understood to represent the new beginnings of a celestial body.“The death of a star results in either a black hole or a supernova, here, death is only a transformation, it outshines everything else and evolves into a new life. It reminds us of Beirut, this city that was reborn over and over again, a place where time and space are different, where beauty is in the small things or even in the memories of it,” David/Nicolas says.“Through a collection of tables, cabinets and rugs, David/Nicolas built upon their fascination with time and the universe to create a retro-futuristic ensemble that speaks to the beauty of regeneration. Selecting inspirational touchstones that range from oriental geometry, to antique furniture, robots, space travel, and the music of Daft Punk – David/Nicolas’ retro-futurist aesthetic is continued in their newest series of work through the narrative at the core of Supernova,” a descriptive note by the gallery states.The show exhibits pieces that chart the transformative nature of the celestial body through materials that evoke concepts of both form and void. “Supernova” is on view through October 6, 2018 at Carpenters Workshop Gallery, 54 Rue De La Verrerie, Paris, France.For details, visit: http://www.blouinartinfo.com/galleryguide/carpenters-workshop-gallery/overviewClick on the slideshow for a sneak peek at the exhibition. http://www.blouinartinfo.com/                                              Founder: Louise Blouin 

Sir David Adjaye to Receive Washington University International Humanities Prize

The Center for the Humanities will be presenting the 2018 Washington University International Humanities Prize and Medal to internationally renowned architect Sir David Adjaye, on October 29. Adjaye will receive a $25,000 prize, an endowment from David and Ph
Architecture & Design

Sir David Adjaye to Receive Washington University International Humanities Prize

The Center for the Humanities will be presenting the 2018 Washington University International Humanities Prize and Medal to internationally renowned architect Sir David Adjaye, on October 29. Adjaye will receive a $25,000 prize, an endowment from David and Phyllis Wilson Grossman.“David Adjaye is one of the most influential architects of his generation, known for major public spaces in North America, Europe, and Africa,” said Jean Allman, the J.H. Hexter Professor in the Humanities and director of the Center for the Humanities in Arts & Sciences, which administers the award. “But what sets Adjaye apart from his contemporaries is his humanistic approach to design. His work embodies the human experience in all its trauma, beauty and wonder.”Recognized as a leading architect of his generation, Adjaye is known especially for his work on major public spaces in North America, Europe, and Africa. According to the Center for the Humanities in Arts & Sciences, “When the Adjaye-designed National Museum of African American History and Culture opened last September, the New York Times named it the cultural event of the year. Thirteen months later, his project team won the commission for the UK’s National Holocaust Memorial and Learning Center. It’s projects like these that were recognized with knighthood by Queen Elizabeth II in January 2017 for service to the field of architecture and that earned him a spot on Time magazine’s list of the 100 most influential people that same year.”Other accolades include Design Miami/ Artist of the Year title in 2011, the Wall Street Journal Innovator Award in 2013, and the 2016 Panerai London Design Medal from the London Design Festival.Thelma Golden, the director of the Studio Museum in Harlem, another Adjaye design, states in her essay on his work for Time: “His work – deeply rooted in both the present moment and the complex context of history – has envisioned new ways for culture to be represented and reflected in the built environment.”The International Humanities Prize and Medal is awarded biennially to a person who has contributed significantly to the humanities either through a supremely well-crafted work or an entire body of work that has dramatically changed how we see or understand a particular place, event, person, idea or field of expression, or through courageously persevering in a humanities pursuit in an atmosphere of persecution, according to the Center for the Humanities in Arts & Sciences.http://www.blouinartinfo.com                                         Founder: Louise Blouin  

R. Buckminster Fuller Retrospective at Edward Cella Art & Architecture

Richard Buckminster Fuller’s retrospective, “Inventions and Models” is currently on view at the Edward Cella Art & Architecture, Los Angeles, through November 3, 2018. The exhibition gives a peek into Fuller’s perspective on the world and humanity
Architecture & Design

R. Buckminster Fuller Retrospective at Edward Cella Art & Architecture

Richard Buckminster Fuller’s retrospective, “Inventions and Models” is currently on view at the Edward Cella Art & Architecture, Los Angeles, through November 3, 2018. The exhibition gives a peek into Fuller’s perspective on the world and humanity.Fuller (1895-1983) is considered one of the most influential thinkers of the 20th Century and his ability to think across disciplines, connecting the worlds of science, engineering, architecture, design, and art was one of his most important and lasting contributions.The exhibition surveys many of Fuller’s most important inventions and cultural contributions. One of the highlights is the “Inventions” portfolio. He held more than thirty patents, a few of which — including “4D House,” the “Dymaxion Car” and the “Geodesic Dome,” — are part of the exhibition. Also featured are a group of unique and editioned structural models built of steel and thermoplastics, limited edition prints and rarer works of ephemera which highlight the structural systems and their practical applications in architecture, housing, transportation, and cartography. A short film “Bucky Fuller & Spaceship Earth,” tracing Fuller’s life and career, complements the show.“The exhibition reveals Fuller’s dedication to the potential of innovative integrated design and technology to revolutionize construction and improve human life. Fuller thought this was possible by doing “more with less.” Inspired by basic geometries and the forces of nature, Fuller applied the tetrahedron and tensegrity forms in structural systems that offered unprecedented solutions to specific human problems. These forms are an essential part of most of his designs, which span in scale from domestic to global,” a press note on the gallery website states.  Another highlight is a group of wire and steel tensegrity models, representing architectural systems that explore structural design and are based on repeatable geometric elements — including “The Triad.” Larger sculptural models such as “Closest Packing of Spheres,” the “Duo-Tet Star Polyhedra,” and the functional “Dymaxion Rowing Needle” (a 21-foot dual hull rowing shell intended for use on choppy waters), are also part of the exhibition.“Produced in the last years of his life, these works are part of a group of multiples that explore and present his theories of structural design. Fuller’s objects and prints function not only as models of the mathematical and geometric properties underlying their construction but also as elegant works of art. As such, the works represent the hybridity of Fuller’s practice, and his legacy across the fields of art, design, science, and engineering. The exhibited works were produced in collaboration with Carl Solway Gallery and have been long held away from public view in several private collections,” the gallery informs.  The exhibition is on view through November 3, 2018 at Edward Cella Art + Architecture, 2754 S. La Cienega Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90034For more information, visit: https://www.edwardcella.com/Click on the slideshow for a sneak peek at the exhibition. http://www.blouinartinfo.com                                        Founder: Louise Blouin   

Osamu Kojima’s ‘Meditation’ at Jason Jacques Gallery, New York

Japanese artist and ceramicist Osamu Kojima will be presenting his works at the Jason Jacques Gallery, New York from September 12. The show coincides with Asia Week, also being held in New York.Kojima is known for his masterful use of clay, glass, and glaze t
Architecture & Design

Osamu Kojima’s ‘Meditation’ at Jason Jacques Gallery, New York

Japanese artist and ceramicist Osamu Kojima will be presenting his works at the Jason Jacques Gallery, New York from September 12. The show coincides with Asia Week, also being held in New York.Kojima is known for his masterful use of clay, glass, and glaze to deliberately blur the boundaries between the organic and the manmade. “Kojima’s work ranges from slabbed and stacked ceramic works to small, jagged, natural forms that have the silent nobility of rock left to accrue the signs of age. Through running fissures and eddies of glaze, the false fixity of stone gives way to the beauty of transience,” describes the gallery.For nearly two decades, Kojima has been working with clay as well as pigments, glazes, and glass to underscore its material properties. The artist’s studio is close to Iga and Shigaraki, which have been homes to important ceramic communities throughout history. “My  most recent work consists of a contemporary landscape that evokes memories of the past,” explains the artist. “Used stones are an image that I use as a symbol of technology created by civilizations throughout time.”“Kojima’s sculptures are inspired both by natural scenery and products of the human hand, the indexes of civilization which one may imagine being subsumed by nature. His works highlight the ceramic medium’s ability to evoke its origin in both nature and artifice, speaking to the inescapable essence of any object as trace of the act of its own making. As the glass and glaze crackles and drips, each piece takes on the translucence of water and the reticence of a layered lava-flow,” describes the gallery. “Ancient in appearance, his work seems to have been hewn by the earth itself. It is focused figuratively and literally on organic mechanisms of development, so that the finished work emerges rather than being made. A form emerges with glass pools like water, and colors permeate the roughly-hewn surface of the clay.”Gallery principal Jason Jacques was struck by Kojima’s treatment of material, and called it something “truly sublime.” “Kojima has the ability to change how we think of clay and glazes. At first, you see stone— and then the human element shines through, and you see the sculptural form placed within its surroundings as both a part of the environment and a trace of the natural world,” says Jacques.Kojima has taught and shown work internationally and developed a repertoire of lectures and exhibitions, including St. Luca’s School in Ghent, Belgium, Galerie Pierre in Taiwan, International Academy of Ceramics in Ireland, and Inax Galleria Ceramica in Tokyo.The exhibition will be on view from September 12 to October 27, 2018 at Jason Jacques Gallery, 29 East 73rd Street, New York, NY 10021For more information, visit: http://www.jasonjacques.com/Click on the slideshow for a sneak peek at the exhibition.http://www.blouinartinfo.com                                        Founder: Louise Blouin  

The City of Light is Celebrating Paris Design Week

Paris Design Week kicked off last week transforming the city into a buzzing hub for the best of design, interior decoration, and lifestyle from across the world. The 10-day celebration of design and creativity, from September 6-15, brings the essence of MAISO
Architecture & Design

The City of Light is Celebrating Paris Design Week

Paris Design Week kicked off last week transforming the city into a buzzing hub for the best of design, interior decoration, and lifestyle from across the world. The 10-day celebration of design and creativity, from September 6-15, brings the essence of MAISON&OBJET into the heart of the City of Light. More than 200 venues are joining the event, including showrooms, boutiques, galleries, ateliers, restaurants, and cultural institutions, housing exclusive events.Paris Design Week and MAISON&OBJET offer a springboard for emerging designers. This year’s exhibition “Born and Raised,” features 21 French and international designers with their new projects and collaborative designs. A dedicated exhibition showing the works of former Rising Talents Award and Rado Star Prize winners is on view in the heart of MAISON&OBJET (Hall 6). The event also includes an exhibition for fourth-year students at the Ecole Nationale Superieure des Arts Decoratifs (ENSAD), curated by Jose Levy, as well as an installation by watchmaker Rado.Chantal Hamaide leads “The Talks at Ground Control,” bringing on stage the industry’s most influential figures, including Thomas Le Thierry, Matali Crasset, Pauline Deltour, Philippe Mihelic, Patrick Jouin, Ana Mir and Emili Padros of Emilianastudio, Nicola Delon, Didier Faustino, and Mathieu Lehanneur.  The French edition of Rado Star Prize is being organized for the sixth consecutive year around the theme “Design Inspired by Nature.” Ten finalists and one winner presented their designs at Le Off, from September 6-9, as part of the Rado exhibition at Ground Control. This year’s winner, Jean-Baptiste Durand for his “Brume Lamp,” will take home a €5,000 prize and a Rado True Thinline Nature watch.One of the highlights of the event is the Eiffel Tower’s new lighting designed by mother-and-daughter lighting gurus Motoko Ishii and Akari-Lisa Ishii to evoke of the radiance of the rising sun as part of Japonismes 2018. A host of events, exhibitions, and activities in collaboration with Japan are being presented in Japonismes 2018 throughout the city.From innovative lighting to a celebration of material and color, Paris Design Week spotlights iconic design in its exciting line-up of exhibits from top design galleries. The week-long event also features a range of exhibitions from Paris’ domestic waste management agency Syctom as part of MAISON&OBJET’s theme Virtuous, highlighting the impact of quality, beauty, and — more importantly — fairness.Paris Design Week runs through September 15, 2018.For more information, visit: https://www.maison-objet.com/en/paris-design-weekClick on the slideshow for a sneak peek at the event.  http://www.blouinartinfo.com                                        Founder: Louise Blouin  

Flynn Talbot’s ‘Full Spectrum’ at London Design Biennale

Australian lighting artist and designer Flynn Talbot’s “Full Spectrum” installation is being presented in the Australia pavilion at the 2018 London Design Biennale. Talbot has created a rainbow-colored light screen with 150 strands of fibre optic light
Architecture & Design

Flynn Talbot’s ‘Full Spectrum’ at London Design Biennale

Australian lighting artist and designer Flynn Talbot’s “Full Spectrum” installation is being presented in the Australia pavilion at the 2018 London Design Biennale. Talbot has created a rainbow-colored light screen with 150 strands of fibre optic light, each one a different color, which hang from a freestanding structure.Describing his inspiration for the installation, Talbot says: “Responding to this years London Design Biennale theme of ‘Emotional States,’ I wanted to explore a positive emotion, and represent a positive Australia. When same-sex marriage became legal in December 2017, there was instantly a new tangible feeling in the air of what love means. I was inspired by this new notion of love and decided I would use this as the starting point for my Australian pavilion.”Through the tactile and immersive light installation, Talbot aims to recreate the feeling of love through light. “I see love as a full spectrum emotion and have used the full spectrum of color,” says the designer. Visitors are invited to interact with the strands of fibre optic light, which the designer hopes, would connect them to the feeling of love washing through Australia right now.“The structure was formed to trace the lines of the historic vaulted space at Somerset House, creating a link between modern Australia and the exhibition space in London. Using custom made LED modules and electronics, I was able to conceal the lighting technology within the refined structure so the focus would be on the luminous colour experience. I hope this installation sends a message to the many other countries where same-sex marriage is not currently legal and that love has the power to heal the world,” says the designer.The installation is on view at the Somerset House in London through September 23, 2018.For more information, visit: http://www.londondesignbiennale.com/Click on the slideshow for a sneak peek at the installation. http://www.blouinartinfo.com                                         Founder: Louise Blouin  

"Money makes me ugly, Mickey makes me happy” at Etage Projects, Copenhagen

Etage Projects in Copenhagen is showcasing “Money makes me ugly, Mickey makes me happy” by Raquel Quevedo.Etage Projects, Copenhagen presents Raquel Quevedo’s sculptures “Money makes me ugly, Mickey makes me happy,” on view through October 24, 2018.
Architecture & Design

"Money makes me ugly, Mickey makes me happy” at Etage Projects, Copenhagen

Etage Projects in Copenhagen is showcasing “Money makes me ugly, Mickey makes me happy” by Raquel Quevedo.Etage Projects, Copenhagen presents Raquel Quevedo’s sculptures “Money makes me ugly, Mickey makes me happy,” on view through October 24, 2018.“Perfect and polished objects are hidden under the word ‘lifestyle’. It’s time for a change! Serialisation no longer informs the way I create; I can make objects ‘now’, in the present tense. They are no longer enslaved by the memory of taste. I don’t want objects that work as serial products in our memories! I want them to express themselves! I want them to say something! Now is the time of the no-time; where design objects camouflage themselves underneath artistic sculptures looking for their place to live in, their space to conquer; where I make physical objects that switch their shape and re-exist in other digital hyper-realities. It’s now time to treat Mickey for drinks!,” Raquel says.“My aim when I started this project was to recycle the left-out materials that kept on piling up in my studio. I wanted to turn trash into something aesthetically pleasing and visually powerful. At the very beginning, I wanted to use those materials to create sculptures that were going to have the shape of various typefaces. Experimenting with photography and sculpture, I decided to create a piece without thinking what the final result would be,” Raquel adds.The artist says that with this project, he was interested in generating a similar system of creation and diffusion of images to the one we use when we use our computer or cell-phone; whatever isn’t photographed, it doesn’t exist.Through this project the artist contrast the created pieces (physical, real) with their “alter egos” or “parallel lives” (digital photographs, fiction).“The artist is interested in generating a feedback between the physical sculptures and the ‘analogue’ ones through the digital multiplicity of the piece itself. The artist is interested in exploring the tensions between what is real and what is fiction, and at the same time to explore the parallel life for the trash itself,” says the gallery."Money makes me ugly, Mickey makes me happy” is on view through September 20, 2018 at Etage Projects, Borgergade 15E, 1300 Copenhagen, Denmark.For details, visit: http://www.etageprojects.com/        Click on the slideshow for a sneak peek at the exhibition.http://www.blouinartinfo.com/                              Founder: Louise Blouin 

Tom Dixon Launches “Rock” Marble Tableware Inspired by India

Tom Dixon’s “Rock” collection features candle holders, dumbells, and serving platters made from green forest marble sourced from India.  Consisting of two different sizes of stackable candle holders, three different shaped chopping boards and servi
Architecture & Design

Tom Dixon Launches “Rock” Marble Tableware Inspired by India

Tom Dixon’s “Rock” collection features candle holders, dumbells, and serving platters made from green forest marble sourced from India.  Consisting of two different sizes of stackable candle holders, three different shaped chopping boards and serving platters with grooved surfaces, and a playful dumbbell design, the items are described by the studio as «a collection of interactive, playful and stackable sculptures, which act as architecture for your dining table.»Tom Dixon was inspired by the hand lathe workers of Rajasthan and Agra during his many trips to India. “For this collection, he wanted to create simple shapes that could be turned by hand on the lathe and stacked together like children's building blocks,” Dezeen quotes the studio.The pattern and texture of each piece in the collection is entirely unique, depending on the block of marble it was carved from.During Milan furniture fair, Dixon told Dezeen: «Marble, wood and plastic, glass, iron, brass and copper are the basic building blocks that have defined our products from the outset.»Dixon's architectural interiors practice Design Research Studio incorporated marble elements into the Sandwich cafe at Harrods in London, the Himitsu cocktail lounge in Atlanta, and at a restaurant called Eclectic in Paris as well as the studio previously produced stackable marble bathroom accessories.The collection launched on September 1 online and at Tom Dixon's Flagship Shop in King's Cross, which was opened earlier this year when the brand relocated its entire offices from Ladbroke Grove to a former Victorian coal yard, reports Dezeen.http://www.blouinartinfo.com/                                              Founder: Louise Blouin 

Panamarenko’s “Codex and other unique works” at Samuel Vanhoegaerden Gallery, Knokke

Samuel Vanhoegaerden Gallery in Knokke features a special exhibition in which the Panamarenko’s “Codex” is the highlight.On view through September 16, the exhibition features “Codex,” preserved in a private collection, in the form of a book consisti
Architecture & Design

Panamarenko’s “Codex and other unique works” at Samuel Vanhoegaerden Gallery, Knokke

Samuel Vanhoegaerden Gallery in Knokke features a special exhibition in which the Panamarenko’s “Codex” is the highlight.On view through September 16, the exhibition features “Codex,” preserved in a private collection, in the form of a book consisting of 134 pages in the form of cards, in six chapters, containing 168 drawings and 65 manuscripts that Panamarenko made between 1972 and 1975 and which form the pivot of Panamarenko's oeuvre.“The exhibition also includes some typical works of Panamarenko such as the model for the Raven’s ‘Variable Matrix,’ the ‘Umbilly-wing,’ an original variant of the Zeppelin ‘The Aeromodeller,’” the gallery says.Panamarenko started his codex in the 1970s just as Leonardo da Vinci kept his codex. The codex provides a unique insight into the thinking and design process of the Antwerp artist. The “Panamarenko Codex,” which can be labeled as the artistic testimony to the creation of his oeuvre, disappeared for years in a private collection and is now being shown for the first time in years in its entirety.The codex contains the original designs, drawings and manifestos of his innovative theories about the helicopter as the winner of the airspace, the space theory to shoot an atom with a one-off impulse, the flapping method of insect wings, flying with manpower and driving with jet drive.The drawings he produces with exceptional precision show the earliest designs for his later planes and planes, which we know as the imposing flying boat Scotch Gambit, the aircraft Umbilly, “U-Kontrol” and “Propslibelle” and the rubber car “Polistes.”The codex also records the new definition of the artist Panamarenko as an engineer and scientist. Until then, he was mainly associated with happenings, performances and poetic objects. Only when Joseph Beuys informed him that technicity and science can also be shown as art, a new door opens for him.Panamarenko, born Henri Van Herwegen, now 78 years old, steered his career as an active artist in 2005 at the end of the vast and glorious retrospective devoted to him at the Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium in Brussels. He has also designed a revolutionary submarine, the “Zemblaya” and other heterogeneous objects from his imagination to say the least overflowing.The exhibition is on view through September 16, 2018 at Samuel Vanhoegaerden Gallery,  Zeedijk-Het Zoute 720, 8300 Knokke-Heist, Belgium.For details, visit: http://www.svhgallery.be/Click on the slideshow for a sneak peek at the exhibition.http://www.blouinartinfo.com/                                               Founder: Louise Blouin

Christien Meindertsma’s “Beyond the Surface” at Vitra Design Museum

Vitra Design Museum in Weil am Rhein, Germany, is hosting “Beyond the Surface,” featuring works by Dutch artist and designer Christien Meindertsma. The show runs through January 20, 2019.This is the artist’s first solo exhibition outside her country.
Architecture & Design

Christien Meindertsma’s “Beyond the Surface” at Vitra Design Museum

Vitra Design Museum in Weil am Rhein, Germany, is hosting “Beyond the Surface,” featuring works by Dutch artist and designer Christien Meindertsma. The show runs through January 20, 2019.This is the artist’s first solo exhibition outside her country. “For Christien Meindertsma, the creation of a product is only one element of the design process. In her unique approach, she explores the mechanisms of modern industrial production, undertaking expeditions to factories and conducting meticulous detective work at waste disposal sites and workshops — while bringing her unquenchable thirst for knowledge to interviews with the protagonists of these adventures,” the museum says.The show looks at Meindertsma’s work with the materials of wool, flax, incinerator bottom ash, and recycled wool. The display features projects such as the “One Sheep Sweater,” 2018, for this, the artist produced garments from the coats of individual sheep. Also, the “Flax Chair,” 2015, which is an innovative and sustainable furniture piece made from a now rarely used material. This design was nominated for the New Material Award (2016) and won the Dutch Design Award (2016).As the title suggests the exhibition does not focus merely on finished products. It also highlights material samples, prototypes, and photographs. According to the museum, “A particular focus lies on the production processes behind the completed object, which Meindertsma captures by means of films and publications — a method she refers to as ‘documentary design.’ This renders visible how deeply the designer dives into her subject matter, often exploring a topic for long periods of time and positioning one completed project as a launch pad for the next.”Meindertsma’s work is driven by questions such as What are the effects of globalized production chains? How do you define transparency? And how does commodity trading work? Again and again, the following question arises could this be done differently? “Christien Meindertsma’s work and attitude demonstrate that design is not only the act of creating physical objects, but also a means to critically engage with our established modes of consumption and to disrupt thinking patterns in favour of positive change,” the museum adds.Christien Meindertsma (b.1980) is a Dutch artist and designer. She graduated from in 2003 from the Design Academy Eindhoven. Apart from her designs, the artist has also created documentary films and images in collaboration with photographer Mathijs Labadie and filmmaker Roel van Tour. Meindertsma’s books and products are part of museum collections such as the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the Victoria & Albert Museum in London.“Beyond the Surface” runs from August 18, 2018, through January 20, 2019, at the Vitra Design Museum, Charles-Eames-Straße 2, 79576 Weil am Rhein, Germany.For details, visit: http://www.blouinartinfo.com/galleryguide/vitra-design-museum/overviewClick on the slideshow for a sneak peek at the exhibition.http://www.blouinartinfo.comFounder: Louise Blouin

Fortnum & Mason’s Tea-Themed Installation at London Design Festival

As part of London Design Festival 2018, Fortnum & Mason will present Scholten & Baijings and their immersive, contemporary tea installation on the first floor of the historic Fortnum & Mason store in Piccadilly, from September 15-23.Using more tha
Architecture & Design

Fortnum & Mason’s Tea-Themed Installation at London Design Festival

As part of London Design Festival 2018, Fortnum & Mason will present Scholten & Baijings and their immersive, contemporary tea installation on the first floor of the historic Fortnum & Mason store in Piccadilly, from September 15-23.Using more than 80 pieces, designed by them for companies from across the globe, Scholten & Baijings will deliver a unique take on the tea ritual.Designer Stefan Scholten said the collaboration with Fortnum & Mason presented a great opportunity for a colourist. «The setting we will create especially for this occasion will be a field of green hues that encompasses furniture, accessories, and limited- edition products, where 300 years of tradition will meet contemporary Dutch design.»Fortnum’s is famed for beautiful, fun, and whimsical design and it is this passion for the exceptional that has been at the heart of the brand for three centuries.Fortnum’s iconic “Eau de Nil” color provided the inspiration for the installation, with all furniture and products designed by Scholten & Baijings bearing the distinctive green hue. The marble floor and tables in Eau de Nil have been produced by the Italian marble manufacturer Luce di Carrara, while the long grey wool Grid curtains have been woven in the UK for Maharam, the American textile company, and special green upholstered chairs are furnished by HAY, Moroso and Karimoku New Standard.Moreover, in collaboration with Fortnum & Mason, 1616 / arita japan, and Maharam, an exquisite porcelain tea set has been developed for the occasion in the Arita region of Japan, renowned for its fine porcelain since the 17th century.“We are thrilled to be partnering with London Design Festival to celebrate the capital’s status as the global centre of design and are excited to house the installation and give a platform to Scholten & Baijings around the topic of the ceremony of tea — a subject very close to our hearts,” says Zia Zareem-Slade, Customer Experience Director, Fortnum & Mason.The story of Fortnum & Mason legacy began in 1705, when Hugh Mason, a livery stables keeper, rented a spare room to William Fortnum, a footman in Queen Anne’s household. The Royal Family called for having new candles every night, so every evening, when royal courtiers were retiring, Fortnum emptied the candlesticks of the half-used candles and took them home to his lodgings, where he melted them down, replaced the wicks, and created new candles.http://www.blouinartinfo.com/                                                              Founder: Louise Blouin

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