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Architecture & Design

Nendo, the Bouroullecs and Patricia Urquiola Launch New Lamps with Flos

As part of Flos’ extensive 50th anniversary collection, lightingsuspended from belts and lamps were launched at this year’s Salone del Mobile,reports dezeen.The lighting brand included a number of designers such as MichaelAnastassiades, Ronan and Erwan Bo
Architecture & Design

Nendo, the Bouroullecs and Patricia Urquiola Launch New Lamps with Flos

As part of Flos’ extensive 50th anniversary collection, lightingsuspended from belts and lamps were launched at this year’s Salone del Mobile,reports dezeen.The lighting brand included a number of designers such as MichaelAnastassiades, Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec, Antonio Citterio, Formafantasma,Piero Lissoni, Nendo, Philippe Starck, and Patricia Urquiola for the 2019collections. Pieces shown by the brand also included two reissues – the Chiaralamp by Mario Bellini from the 1960s, and a re-release of the first edition ofthe brand’s Bulbo lamp – a 1957 design by Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni. In the latest Flos collections, exhibited as part of Design Holdingfor the first time at their mammoth Salone del Mobile stand, the new furnitureand lighting group showcased its brands in three distinctive areas of anall-white, 4,000-square-meter stand designed by Calvi Brambilla.Formafantasma’s WireLine is made of an LED light source within aribbed glass extrusion and supported by long flat pink rubber cable designed tolook like belts. “The lamp plays on the contrast between the industrial feeling ofthe rubber and the sophistication of glass,” explained Formafantasma foundersAndrea Trimarchi and Simone Farresin. Mushroom-esque light fixtures arecombined with tabletops in Haeru – a modular lighting system by Tokyo designstudio Nendo. Haeru (meaning to grow in Japanese) consists of eight parts intotal: three types of tables, two types of light fixtures, and three supportinglegs that can be used to create custom configurations. “The basic structure ofthe object is made of a three-legged table with a built-in battery. Two of thelegs are cut shorter, thus allowing the user to change and add light fixturesand tabletops depending on their preference,” explained Nendo. Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec have also created Belt, a suspendedlighting system with an unusual suspension element. The designers have createda system that connects leather-wrapped linear LED lighting modules with softand flexible leather belts secured by buckles. “All the elements are uniformlymade of leather belts. Some of them carry the weight, some of them carryelectricity, then of course some of them carry the light,” the designersexplained. Patricia Urquiola has created an outdoor lamp called Caule and a wall lamp called Flauta, which is available in different heights and configurations and inspired by the structure of a flower. https://www.blouinartinfo.com/              Founder: Louise Blouin

Salone del Mobile: The New Place for Luxury Brands

Originally, the Salone del Mobile, which began in 1961, was a coveted home products fair. Every year, professionals from the design and furniture worlds, journalists and industrials, would gather for a few days in the fashion capital to meet architects and de
Architecture & Design

Salone del Mobile: The New Place for Luxury Brands

Originally, the Salone del Mobile, which began in 1961, was a coveted home products fair. Every year, professionals from the design and furniture worlds, journalists and industrials, would gather for a few days in the fashion capital to meet architects and designers. But recently, fashion and luxury companies have joined the party.This year, for example, the French fashion and leather-goods company Longchamp chose Milan over other destinations to present a one-of-a-kind bag. “We wanted to offer our customers a new experience,” said a spokesperson for the brand, “so we asked the Japanese studio Nendo to reimagine Le Pliage bag.” To present this top-notch collaboration with the Japanese designer Oki Sato, the Longchamp team decided to benefit from the crowd who comes to Salone del Mobile, and who would act as an initial sounding board for the promotion of the brand and its new product. Innovation, design and aesthetics were at the forefront of this collaboration with Nendo, so Longchamp saw Milan was the best place to release it. While retaining “the DNA of the original product,” according to Sophie Delafontaine, Longchamp’s creative director, Nendo totally reinvented Le Pliage.Longchamp was not the only brand to launch surprises or important collaborations last week in Milan. Daum, the France-based crystal company, announced a collaboration with the talented artist and gallerist Laurence Bonnel, and presented the first sculptures they created together. “I am so proud to work with one of the most renowned traditional craftmanship companies in the world,” Bonnel said in an interview. “They have mastered crystal for decades and worked with impressive masters and artists.” For its part, Baccarat featured paintings by the artist Alexandre Benjamin Navet during its cocktail sessions.In 2012, Cos was amongst the first clothing brands to orchestrate giant art installations at the fair. This year, they presented an installation by Arthur Mamou-Mani, a French architect, made of 3-D plastic bricks – nothing really connected to clothes. Ditto for Louis Vuitton, which has since 2012 been presenting its nomadic objects, designed by emerging creators such as India Mahdavi or Patricia Urquiola, Marcel Wanders or the Campana Brothers.With exhibitions at the Prada Foundation, furniture signed Hermes, Louis Vuitton, Tod’s, Milan has become a big show, the only one of its kind for the driving forces behind design, art and architecture, and the week was full of events. Tod’s presented a new shoe by the Korean designer Yong Bae Seok, and at the same time financed an installation with Studio Andrea Caputo. The idea behind this double presentation? Explore the relationship between space and clothes. Another example was Dior Maison, who partnered with Dimore Studio, one of the hottest Italian contemporary design companies. On the stand, the 14-piece capsule collection was presented, with trays and frames, amongst other objects. At Loewe it was the same idea, but with a different concept and presentation. The Spanish leather-goods company asked weavers from all over the world to reinvent baskets out of leather, using their own craftsmanship.The stands of other brands such as Fendi or Versace, were this year amongst the most interesting and powerfully designed. The interior designer Sasha Bikoff and the Californian artist Andy Dixon worked on Versace’s space, but visits by the general public were limited.All the biggest names in the luxury world come to Milan regularly to present their permanent collections or their most recent design or art-based collaborations. Beyond becoming a prime location and moment for revelations and promotions of the brands, the world’s most famous professional furniture show has become the N°1 meeting place for the luxury industry, in just a few years. New boutique openings; Cartier taking over the Arco della Pace to celebrate its Santos watch; special projects such as Max Mara’s line of glasses, a collaboration with the German painter Kerstin Bratsch; the co-branding of a pop-up store between Valentino and the Nilufar gallery; a new line of accessories by Ermenegildo Zegna. They were all occasions to celebrate, give parties or present the latest and greatest in the luxury world. p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 18.0px Times} https://www.blouinartinfo.com/              Founder: Louise Blouin

David Chipperfield to convert Old Barracks into University of Padua Campus

David Chipperfield Architects will soon be designing a new campus for one of the world’s oldest surviving universities, reports dezeen.Leaving behind leading firms such as Foster + Partners, Barozzi Veiga, Cruz y Ortiz Arquitectos, Sauerbruch Hutton, and Ba
Architecture & Design

David Chipperfield to convert Old Barracks into University of Padua Campus

David Chipperfield Architects will soon be designing a new campus for one of the world’s oldest surviving universities, reports dezeen.Leaving behind leading firms such as Foster + Partners, Barozzi Veiga, Cruz y Ortiz Arquitectos, Sauerbruch Hutton, and Bak Gordon, David Chipperfield Architects, and engineering company Steam were selected to design a campus of social and economic sciences for the University of Padua, which is the fifth-oldest surviving university on the globe.According to dezeen, the PiaveFutura campus will take over the former Caserma Piave barracks – a disused 50,000-square-meter site in the southwest of the city.Similar to most of the university’s existing facilities, which dates back to the 13th-century, the new campus will be located within the old city walls.Chipperfield’s design involves renovating the old buildings on the site and inserting a new elliptical pavilion at their center. While the old buildings will accommodate teaching, research, and administration, the new structure will create more open study areas, conference facilities, and dining spaces.“The architectural concept is rooted in the idea of a building that will serve both the university and the city, acting as a ‘social condenser,’” explained David Chipperfield Architects. “Reference to the historic architecture of Padua, such as Prato della Valle and the Botanical Garden buildings, is a clear source of inspiration for the proposal and evident in the design.”David Chipperfield Architects was founded in London by David Chipperfield in 1985. Its diverse international body of work includes cultural, residential, commercial, and educational buildings and spaces for the private and public sectors, as well as civic projects and urban masterplans.David Chipperfield Architects has offices in London, Berlin, and Shanghai, as well as Milan. One of the biggest projects to come out of the Italian office is the Museo delle Culture museum and gallery complex in Milan – a project that ended in a row between architect and client. David Chipperfield Architects has won more than 100 international awards and citations for design excellence, including the RIBA Stirling Prize in 2007 for The Museum of Modern Literature in Marbach, Germany, and both the Mies van der Rohe Award (European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture), and the Deutscher Architekturpreis in 2011 for the Neues Museum, Berlin.  https://www.blouinartinfo.com/              Founder: Louise Blouin

J Mayer H builds Concrete-Framed Pipia Panorama House

The German architecture studio J Mayer H has built a house on a cliff next in Tbilisi. Named as Pipia Panorama, the private residence is located in one of the most visible places in the capital of the country of Georgia, reports dezeen.The location allows fas
Architecture & Design

J Mayer H builds Concrete-Framed Pipia Panorama House

The German architecture studio J Mayer H has built a house on a cliff next in Tbilisi. Named as Pipia Panorama, the private residence is located in one of the most visible places in the capital of the country of Georgia, reports dezeen.The location allows fascinating views of the city. To expand these views, even more, the architecture studio has designed the south-facing facade with large windows and terraces. The concrete-framed building forms a canopy over the multiple balconies that stretch across the building, while a zigzag screen creates privacy between the terrace and the Presidential Palace situated next to it.The dezeen report states that the rounded cut-outs in the terraces allow light to reach all levels of the outdoor areas and a roof deck with angular pools and seating areas stretch across the top of the entire house.The studio opted for a two-tone color scheme to give the frame definition. The outer layers that form the canopies and privacy screens are a reflective white, while the inner layers and terraces are an aubergine color. The house has been designed for a multi-generational family living together under one roof.Pipia Panorama overlooks the Rhike Park and the curving reflective form of the as-yet-unopened Studio Fuksas-designed concert and exhibition hall.J. Mayer H. and Partner, Architekten mbB work at the interfaces of architecture, communication design, and new technologies. The use of interactive media and responsive materials plays a central role in the production of space. In collaborative teams, from installations to urban planning and international competitions, multidisciplinary spatial research on the relationship between body, nature, and technology is developed and realized. J. Mayer H was founded by Jurgen Mayer H. in 1996 in Berlin. In January 2014, Andre Santer and Hans Schneider joined as further partners.Jurgen Mayer H. studied architecture at the University of Stuttgart, The Cooper Union New York and at Princeton University. His work has received numerous international awards, most recently the Mies van der Rohe Award Emerging Architect 2003, the Winner Holcim Award Bronze 2005 for Sustainable Architecture, and the First Prize of the Audi Urban Future Award 2010. https://www.blouinartinfo.com/              Founder: Louise Blouin

Diébédo Francis Kéré’s Colorful Towers at Coachella 2019

Diebedo Francis Kere’s new installations have been featured at Coachella 2019.“Sarbale ke” by Diebedo Francis Kere features colorful triangles to form screens around these 12 towers that Dieedo Francis Kere has installed on Coachella’s site in Indio,
Architecture & Design

Diébédo Francis Kéré’s Colorful Towers at Coachella 2019

Diebedo Francis Kere’s new installations have been featured at Coachella 2019.“Sarbale ke” by Diebedo Francis Kere features colorful triangles to form screens around these 12 towers that Dieedo Francis Kere has installed on Coachella’s site in Indio, California. Rising up to 60 feet in height, the conical towers are filled with light displays, reports dezeen.The Berlin-based architect drew on the baobab tree in his native West African village of Gando, Burkina Faso, to design the structures as a place of shade and hub for festival goers. “In my culture, the baobab is the most important tree,” said Kere in the project description. “It’s the place where you get together, celebrate, and discuss,” he added. “It also attracts animals. It is spiritual. Naturally, you will walk toward it.”Diebedo Francis Kere is joined by the Los Angeles–based Office Kovacs for the first time this year. Office Kovacs’s “Colossal Cacti” installation was made with seven fluorescent cacti that range in height from 20 feet to over 50 feet. The cacti reference the colors of Frank Stella’s Multicolored Squares.Diebedo Francis Kere's architectural practice has been recognized nationally and internationally with awards including the Aga Khan Award for Architecture (2004) for his first building, a primary school in Gando, Burkina Faso, and the Global Holcim Award 2012 Gold. Kere has started projects in varied countries including Burkina Faso, Mali, Germany, and Switzerland. In 2017, the Serpentine Galleries commissioned him to design the Serpentine Pavilion in London. He has held professorships at the Harvard Graduate School of Design and the Swiss Accademia di Architettura di Mendrisio. In 2017, he accepted the professorship for Architectural Design and Participation at TU Munich  (Germany).The festival opened to the public for its 20th year with a lineup featuring Childish Gambino, Tame Impala, and Ariana Grande as the headliners for the two-weekend experience. Over half a dozen large-scale installations have been built at Coachella featuring the work of upcoming artists, designers, and architects. Past installation designers and artists have included the likes of Bureau Spectacular, Edoardo Tresoldi, and Olalekan Jeyifous. Returning participants included art duo Dedo Vabo and experiential designers Poetic Kinetics, as well as show design studio NEWSUBSTANCE. Do LaB also returned to create their unique stage designs.   https://www.blouinartinfo.com/              Founder: Louise Blouin

Spire and Roof of Notre-Dame Cathedral Collapses under Raging Fire

A massive fire engulfed the spire and roof of the Cathedral of Notre-Dame in Paris, one of the finest examples of Gothic architecture, as it was undergoing €6 million ($6.8 million) in renovation that began in 2017.According to the New York Times, the fire
Architecture & Design

Spire and Roof of Notre-Dame Cathedral Collapses under Raging Fire

A massive fire engulfed the spire and roof of the Cathedral of Notre-Dame in Paris, one of the finest examples of Gothic architecture, as it was undergoing €6 million ($6.8 million) in renovation that began in 2017.According to the New York Times, the fire broke out about 6:30 p.m. on Monday engulfing the cathedral’s spire. The fire further spread to a roof near the spire destroying its stained-glass windows and the wooden interior before causing the spire to fall.  The 850-year-old cathedral is currently undergoing renovations.“Everything is burning, nothing will remain from the frame,” Notre-Dame spokesperson Andre Finot told French media, according to the Associated Press. Some 500 firefighters battled the raging fire for nearly five hours. By 11 p.m. Paris time, the fire chief, Jean-Claude Gallet, said, the structure had been “saved and preserved as a whole.” The two magnificent towers soaring above the skyline had been spared, he said, but two-thirds of the roof was destroyed.According to the Associated Press, the exact cause of the fire was not known, but French media quoted the Paris fire brigade as saying the fire is “potentially linked” to the renovation project on the church’s spire and its 250 tons of lead. The Paris prosecutor’s office ruled out arson and possible terror-related motives, and said it was treating it as an accident.Mayor Anne Hidalgo of Paris tweeted that the city’s fire department and the Diocese of Paris were coordinating their efforts to fight the fire and set up a security perimeter. According to AP, Deputy Mayor Emmanuel Gregoire told BFMTV that first responders are trying to save the countless artworks and other valuable objects from within the cathedral.French President Emmanuel Macron treated the catastrophic fire as a national emergency said on Twitter, “Notre-Dame is aflame. Great emotion for the whole nation. Our thoughts go out to all Catholics and to the French people. Like all of my fellow citizens, I am sad to see this part of us burn tonight.” In a brief speech at Notre-Dame on Monday night he said, “The worst has been avoided even though the battle is not completely won,” and vowed that the cathedral would be rebuilt.Deputy mayor Emmanuel Gregoire said emergency services were trying to salvage the famed art pieces stored in the cathedral.US President Donald Trump commented on the fire saying, “It’s one of the great treasures of the world. It’s part of our culture, it’s part of our lives. That is a truly great cathedral and I’ve been there, I’ve seen it, and there is... no cathedral in the world like it. It is a terrible scene.” The president added, “It looks like it’s burning to the ground.”Built in the 12th and 13th centuries, Notre-Dame is one of the finest Gothic architectures and a UNESCO World Heritage site. The cathedral is famous for its three large stained-glass rose window that made it one of the most iconic monuments of Paris.  Notre-Dame boasts of some of the finest sculptures and paintings that include a Catholic relic, the crown of thorns, which is only occasionally displayed. The cathedral receives almost 13 million visitors each year from around the globe.  https://www.blouinartinfo.com/              Founder: Louise Blouin

Studio ORD wins Competition to Design Global Terminal and Concourse at Chicago’s O’Hare Airport

Studio ORD will be designing the new O’Hare Global Terminal and Global Concourse — an $8.5 billion expansion program for O’Hare International Airport. The selection of Studio ORD was announced after a competitive selection process from five highly quali
Architecture & Design

Studio ORD wins Competition to Design Global Terminal and Concourse at Chicago’s O’Hare Airport

Studio ORD will be designing the new O’Hare Global Terminal and Global Concourse — an $8.5 billion expansion program for O’Hare International Airport. The selection of Studio ORD was announced after a competitive selection process from five highly qualified architect teams.“The city will now enter into contract negotiations with Studio ORD. Upon contract award, Studio ORD will work with the City of Chicago and the airlines to design the new Global Terminal and Concourse. In the coming months, a second team will be selected from the remaining four finalists to design two new satellite concourses to be built west of Terminal 1,” a press note from the Office of the Mayor read.After completion of the project, the O’Hare Global Terminal, expanding by a million square feet, will be ne of the largest and high-end terminals in the US. The city authorities hope that this large-scale expansion adds to the travel experience for more than 83 million passengers who rely on O’Hare every year. The venture will further help in job creation.  “The City of Chicago called upon teams from across the city and around the world to lead O’Hare’s historic expansion, and Studio ORD answered that call,” said Mayor Emanuel. “During this historic competition, the world’s best architecture firms submitted their incredible visions for the world to see — with each of these five world-class designs strengthening our plans to bring O’Hare into the 21st century.  Today we congratulate Studio ORD who has proven they have the experience, expertise, and the talent needed to work with the City of Chicago as we usher in a new era at O’Hare.”The new O’Hare Global Terminal will be more than double the space at today’s Terminal 2. It would include additional gates; more space for concessions, lounges and public amenities; state-of-the-art new baggage systems; and advanced new technologies to improve security screening.“The selection of the team to design the O’Hare Global Terminal represents a first step forward in redefining the experience for travelers around the world,” said Commissioner Jamie L. Rhee. “While we congratulate Studio ORD, we applaud all of the teams for bringing forward incredible proposals, and thank the public for their input in this process. This project is a game changer for Chicago, and we look forward to ongoing stakeholder engagement from the airport to the neighborhoods as we embark on our historic expansion.”With this project, a unique opportunity for public feedback was created. The terminal designs were unveiled at the at the Chicago Architecture Center earlier in 2019, after which, the public, consisting of residents and travelers, cast more than 41,000 surveys. The public’s feedback was incorporated in the evaluation committee’s review and selection of the lead architect.  https://www.blouinartinfo.com/              Founder: Louise Blouin

Jay Robert Pritzker puts Helmut Jahn’s postmodern building James R Thompson Center in Chicago on sale

Illinois Governor Jay Robert Pritzker has put the James R Thompson Center in Chicago up or sale. J. B. Pritzker signed a bill on April 5, 2019, paving the way for the sale of the massive 17-storey structure designed by German-American architect Helmut Jahn.Th
Architecture & Design

Jay Robert Pritzker puts Helmut Jahn’s postmodern building James R Thompson Center in Chicago on sale

Illinois Governor Jay Robert Pritzker has put the James R Thompson Center in Chicago up or sale. J. B. Pritzker signed a bill on April 5, 2019, paving the way for the sale of the massive 17-storey structure designed by German-American architect Helmut Jahn.The James R Thompson Center, located at 100 W. Randolph Street in the Loop district of Chicago, is considered as one of the finest examples of postmodern architecture in the city. However, the building was never given the title of a historical landmark, and thus was unprotected from future sale or demolition.The sale of the building was first proposed by first Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich as a means to assuage the state budget. The proposal, though first agreed to by lawmakers, was heavily criticized. The plan was declared unconstitutional by the Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan in June 2004, and a mortgage of $200 million was agreed to instead.The signing of the bill by the governor forms part of the continued controversy surrounding the fate of the iconic building.Pritzker’s spokeswoman Jordan Abudayyeh said the sale of the building “is long overdue and will allow the state to leverage one of our biggest assets to help stabilize the pension system.”The Thompson Center has been subject to several years of delayed maintenance and neglect. Under the provisional timeline of its sales plan,  the state would issue a Request For Proposal (RFP) within a year.It is certain that the state will face a certain degree of public backlash against the possibility of tearing down a well-known building designed by one of the world’s most famous architects.  https://www.blouinartinfo.com/              Founder: Louise Blouin

Grasshopper Chair Reissued By House of Finn Juhl

House of Finn Juhl has reissued the Grasshopper, a chair designed 81 years ago by the Danish designer Finn Juhl.The chair has been unveiled at the Salone del Mobile furniture fair, which opened on April 9 as part of Milan design week. Until now only the two o
Architecture & Design

Grasshopper Chair Reissued By House of Finn Juhl

House of Finn Juhl has reissued the Grasshopper, a chair designed 81 years ago by the Danish designer Finn Juhl.The chair has been unveiled at the Salone del Mobile furniture fair, which opened on April 9 as part of Milan design week. Until now only the two original chairs made by Juhl in 1938 existed. Using the original sketches, the company's designers have measured one of the original chairs and compared these with the sketches to recreate the piece of furniture to the exact dimensions of the original. The buttoned back of the chair extends up from the base and curls around on each side at the top to cocoon the sitter. This gives the piece the look of an insect-like head.Juhl originally showed the chair at an exhibition to present the work of the Danish Cabinetmaker's Guild in autumn 1938, on the stand of the respected cabinetmaker Niels Vodder. However, it received a lukewarm response at the time. the reception to it was lukewarm.Speaking on the chair, co-founder of House of Finn Juhl, Hans Henrik Sorensen, said,«It seemed natural that this chair should be brought back to life at some point...Ever since I bought the book Handvaerket viser vejen [The Craftsmanship Leads the Way] as a teenager, in which the Grasshopper was depicted, I have always been fascinated by this expressive chair.» With an oak or walnut frame, and upholstery in fabric or leather, the back legs and armrests converge to a point on the floor at the back of the chair, giving the impression of the bent legs of a grasshopper about to jump.«The Grasshopper gives you the impression of something powerful and springy – it is both graphical and organic at once, almost animalistic in its expression and in its details,» said Sorensen. «Just take a look at how each part plays with shape and profile – the round and the concave that gently meets in a delicate joint.»Born in 1912, Juhl was one of the most influential Danish furniture and interior designers of the 1940s and 1950s. Among his best known works are the interiors of the Danish Broadcasting House, Copenhagen Airport and the Trusteeship Council Chamber at the UN headquarters in New York. https://www.blouinartinfo.com/              Founder: Louise Blouin

Alex Chinneck's New Installation

Alex Chinneck has unveiled a new installation for the duration of Milan design week.The installation features an old Milanese building ripped open by giant zips. It sees one of the building's 17-metre-wide facades peeling back, and also creates openings in it
Architecture & Design

Alex Chinneck's New Installation

Alex Chinneck has unveiled a new installation for the duration of Milan design week.The installation features an old Milanese building ripped open by giant zips. It sees one of the building's 17-metre-wide facades peeling back, and also creates openings in its interior walls and floor.Chinneck created the work for Iqos, the vaping and heated tobacco brand. He added a giant zip that seems to open the front of the building's right side to reveal a glowing light behind that fades between blue and bright white. Inside, a semi-circular hole in the floor has been unzipped so that the cement floor appears to peel back, emitting a bright white light from below. Chinneck excavated and re-poured the entire concrete floor in order to install the artwork. Another zip down the centre of an internal wall seems to drag the wall itself down and reveals a glowing light behind.«Through the repeated use of the zipper, we have opened up the fabric of a seemingly historic Milanese building to playfully reimagine what lies behind its facade, floors and walls,» said Chinneck. Ethereal light pours through each opening, filling the space with colour and filling the work with a sense of positivity and potential,« said Chinneck. »By taking familiar materials and architectural forms and making them behave in extraordinary ways, we are working with Iqos to change visitors' perceptions of what is possible."This is the first project by the artist in Italy. Chinneck gained popularity through a series of installations in London and the south-east of the UK, including Telling the Truth Through False Teeth, a project in which he fitted 312 identical broken window panes in an abandoned factory in London's Hackney.For London Design Festival four years ago, Chinneck planted an upside-down electricity pylon in a field near the financial district of Canary Wharf. He also unzipped a soon-to-be-demolished office building in Ashford, Kent last summer, near to where he had recently moved his studio.Uniting the disciplines of art, architecture and theatre the work of British sculptor Alex Chinneck is monumental in ambition and impact, producing contextually responsive interventions that animate the place in which they stand.  Alex Chinneck is a graduate of Chelsea College of Art and a member of the Royal British Society of Sculptors. His work has been featured extensively by international media with selected projects welcoming over one million visitors. https://www.blouinartinfo.com/              Founder: Louise Blouin

Graham Baba Designs Moody Deep Dive Speakeasy

US studio Graham Baba Architects has designed the Deep Dive bar located at the Amazon Spheres.Taking cues from speakeasies and adventure novels the studio has created a dimly lit bar with oddities and nature-inspired decor, such as dried plants and taxidermy.
Architecture & Design

Graham Baba Designs Moody Deep Dive Speakeasy

US studio Graham Baba Architects has designed the Deep Dive bar located at the Amazon Spheres.Taking cues from speakeasies and adventure novels the studio has created a dimly lit bar with oddities and nature-inspired decor, such as dried plants and taxidermy.Local studio Graham Baba Architects designed the bar to evoke the sensation of being on a journey. The front door is discreetly tucked between two of the spheres.«Loosely inspired by the prohibition-era speakeasy, Deep Dive takes its aesthetic inspiration from the worlds of Charles Darwin and Jules Verne and captures the human spirit of curiosity and imagination. Accessed via a nondescript door tucked discreetly between the two Amazon Spheres, the experience unfolds as a journey. Deep Dive is one of three venues created in retail spaces located between and below the Spheres—spaces created without specific programs identified. Graham Baba was asked to prepare conceptual ideation for these three spaces – Experiential and Programmatic function. City regulations stipulated that each of the three spaces are open to the public; the challenge was how to activate them. Initial concepts conceived of the spaces in terms of their emotional, intellectual, and sensory potential, rather than by function. Following approval of the experiential concept, functional aspects were identified as a bar, a multi-purpose exhibition space, and a restaurant. Deep Dive is the manifestation of the bar space,» stated Graham Baba Architects.The 1,677-square-foot (156-square-metre) speakeasy is divided into a main room and a more intimate space called the library. Dimly lit, the main area features dark walls, wooden flooring and a stone-topped bar. Overhead, a ceiling installation made of steel ribbons adds visual interest while also concealing mechanical equipment. Various types of seating – including a tufted banquette – are upholstered with dark blue velvet. The bar is lined with glass cloches filled with dried plants and small taxidermy. The main area from the library is separated by glass-and-steel wall.Deep Dive is the latest venture by Renee Erickson, a renowned local chef and restaurateur. In addition to an extensive cocktail list, the bar offers snacks such as cured salmon and caviar toast. Offerings are presented in a leather-bound menu.Graham Baba Architects is a vibrant Seattle architecture firm recognized for the successful place-making of commercial, residential and arts spaces.  Whether through the renovation of existing buildings or in new construction, the firm believes authenticity can - and should - be found in every building by use of honest materials such as metals, wood and glass celebrated in their natural state. https://www.blouinartinfo.com/              Founder: Louise Blouin

Regency Time Tumbler Offered for Sale at Christie's

Regency Time Tumbler will be featured at Christie’s upcoming sale, titled “The Collector: The French Taste” that will be held on April 18, 2019, in Paris. The pre-auction estimate of this tumbler is 40,000 EUR - 60,000 EUR, and it will be presented in l
Architecture & Design

Regency Time Tumbler Offered for Sale at Christie's

Regency Time Tumbler will be featured at Christie’s upcoming sale, titled “The Collector: The French Taste” that will be held on April 18, 2019, in Paris. The pre-auction estimate of this tumbler is 40,000 EUR - 60,000 EUR, and it will be presented in lot 56 at the auction. It is attributed to Etienne Doirat. “Architectural and elegant, richly enhanced with gilded bronze, this dresser is part of the homogeneous corpus of works by Etienne Doirat, one of the most talented cabinet-makers during the Regency era. Etienne Doirat (around 1670 - 1732) was destined to embrace a career as a craftsman because of his family origins whose oldest members settled at the end of the 16th century in Faubourg Saint-Antoine. The exact date on which he was received as a master is unknown, but his marriage contract of 1704 defined him as an «ebony carpenter.» Etienne Doirat is no exception to the family tradition since he will always remain in the suburbs but will change address several times: in 1704 he is installed at Grande-Rue-du-Faubourg, in 1711 it is rue Sainte Marguerite, in 1720 he returns Grande-Rue-du-Faubourg but at La Croix Rouge," in 1726 he seems to have found his final residence Cour de la Contrescarpe des Fosses de la Bastille,” states the auction house. The present art piece is made in violet wood veneer, chiseled bronze ornamentation, gray marble top, the facade decorated with foliated scrolls and facing sphinges opening with five drawers on three rows. The uprights are adorned with leafy staple falls and the sides are centered on a leafy rosette underlined with cornucopia. The feet end with hooves in roll and stamped E DOIRAT and Ph. PERRIN (not listed) on the four amounts. Christie’s further comments, “One of the specifications of Etienne Doirat is to have, unlike his peers like Boulle or Cressent, affixed his stamp on furniture leaving his studio. Indeed, the statutes of the corporation of 1743 concerning the obligation to stamp are only a reminder of the somewhat forgotten rule of the statutes of December 6, 1637. However, as stated in the study of Jean-Dominique Augarde, Doirat would finally stamp that little furniture given the volume produced that is imagined accordingly pro-rata 30 years of career; he would, therefore, have stamped his furniture only on the last years corresponding to the most accomplished furniture.” https://www.blouinartinfo.com/              Founder: Louise Blouin

New Office Works’ “Growing Up” Pavilion Opened on West Kowloon Waterfront

The Hong Kong-based architectural studio New Office Works recently unveiled a pavilion structure with a sloped roof and slender columns, within Hong Kong’s West Kowloon cultural district. Named “Growing Up,” the pavilion offers a covered seating ar
Architecture & Design

New Office Works’ “Growing Up” Pavilion Opened on West Kowloon Waterfront

The Hong Kong-based architectural studio New Office Works recently unveiled a pavilion structure with a sloped roof and slender columns, within Hong Kong’s West Kowloon cultural district. Named “Growing Up,” the pavilion offers a covered seating area in the rapidly developing locality and is set alongside Hong Kong’s much-famed M+ Pavilion. The project’s name derives from the idea that the city is cultivating its culture, and is also a reference to the future of the newly-planted greenery of neighboring Nursery Park. “Just as the process of growing trees requires good soil, so does the process of growing culture requires a strong foundation of collective memories of the city. ‘Growing Up’ captures everyday elements fundamental to Hong Kong, embedding and cultivating them within the fabric of soon-to-be major arts and cultural center,” explains the architecture studio. Describing the elements of the pavilion’s design and explaining the philosophy that guided their designing, the studio states, “A large sloped roof is supported by a series of timber columns that, like the seedlings in the adjacent nursery park, grow from an intimate human scale to the harbor scale. A stepped landscape below, reminiscent of the city’s hilly topography, provides both seating and stage for different activities.” The pavilion has been built to host markets, small concerts, and dance performances. According to New Office Works, despite its simple volume, each angle of the pavilion reveals a different sense of porosity, materiality, and scale.  Its angular but modest form aims to present different narratives through each elevation. As explained by the studio, “The north and south elevations are characterized by transparency, the surrounding trees a seamless backdrop between the pavilion’s slender columns. However, as one move around and the columns overlap in perspective, the pavilion edge becomes more solid and frames the waterfront view. The pavilion appears the densest from the east, the structure of the steps forming an intricate screen to accentuate the transition from park to the waterfront. In contrast, an open gathering space and distinct profile emerge from the harbor.” Inside, the stepped seating area contrasts against the verticality of the structure. Like the exterior topography, it offers a viewing platform to the harbor and the surrounding neighborhood. The pavilion also highlights rain as a constant of the city through both the construction and aesthetic of its roof structure. The roof structure, which is similar to the system of traditional Chinese roof tiles, enables a natural draining system designed to adapt to Hong Kong’s wetter seasons. As rightly pointed out by the studio, with the aesthetic diversity in its design, “the pavilion’s multifaceted character truly reflects the rich diversity of Hong Kong.” Evelyn Ting, who co-founded New Office Works in 2014 with Paul Tse, designed the pavilion to reference familiar local features like the narrow alleys, scaffolding, and steps. Located in the arts and culture district of West Kowloon, the project was the winner of the inaugural Hong Kong Young Architects & Designers competition to design a temporary pavilion on the prominent waterfront and forms part of the West Kowloon district masterplan by Foster + Partners, which will contain 17 new cultural venues.  https://www.blouinartinfo.com/              Founder: Louise Blouin

Brani & Desi Studio’s “Breakfast with Mondrian” is an Experiment with Forms and Colors

Bulgarian studio Brani & Desi has designed a concept for an apartment that would translate Dutch artist Piet Mondrian’s Abstract paintings into 3D form. Named, “Breakfast with Mondrian,” the project, as described by the studio, “is an experimenta
Architecture & Design

Brani & Desi Studio’s “Breakfast with Mondrian” is an Experiment with Forms and Colors

Bulgarian studio Brani & Desi has designed a concept for an apartment that would translate Dutch artist Piet Mondrian’s Abstract paintings into 3D form. Named, “Breakfast with Mondrian,” the project, as described by the studio, “is an experimental project where the use of forms, lines, and colors is focusing on the positive impact that space can provoke on the people inhabiting it.” Talking about the inspiration behind the project, Brani and Desi says, “The design concept is inspired by the Dutch painter Piet Mondrian’s vision of nature, which was manifested through his simple and pure Abstract paintings. He is one of the founders of the De Stijl art movement, an artistic style, which is recognized by the use of horizontal and vertical lines, and the fundamental colors – red, blue, yellow. With these elements, the artist developed a new plastic language where he shows how he sees the world, nature, and the human — as one unity. In his paintings, he represents the perfect harmony between the elements of this unity.”  The studio adds, “Mondrian’s aim was to provoke emotions in viewers. The viewers should feel themselves dancing while watching his paintings. In our project, we want to provoke the same emotions. Through lines and colors, the inhabitants and their guests should feel themselves as if they are part of a dance.” True to Mondrian’s aesthetics and practice, Brani & Desi’s “Breakfast with Mondrian” apartment features bold blocks of primary color intended to evoke positive emotions. In the “dance between form and colors,” the studio, as described in the project note, has used “the white and black colors at intervals between them. The white is active, the black is passive.” The studio adds, “As Mondrian says that through oppositions of color and line one can see the plastic expression of relationships.” The conceptual interior of this experimental apartment is designed as an open space where every zone has its own function but is connected to the rest of the home at the same time. This spatial layout is also inspired by Mondrian’s depiction of nature. As the studio explains, “The meaning is that the kitchen cannot be without the dining room or living room. As in nature everything is connected and cannot without its parts, because one unity cannot be unity without its parts.”Though the project is at the conceptual level at the moment, the designers state that if realized, it would be created with epoxy resin paint. However, for Brani and Desi studio, more than the realization of the project in practicality, what mattered while conceptualizing the design was “to experiment with shapes and colors and their impact on humans.” Brani & Desi is a Bulgarian design studio, founded and headed by identical twin sisters Branimira Ivanova and Desislava Ivanova. The studio is known for designing interior spaces with bold geometry and colors.  https://www.blouinartinfo.com/              Founder: Louise Blouin

Rikako Nagashima Designs SCRAP_CMYK Curtain Collection for Kinnasand Lab

Scrap_CMYK is a curtain collection created by the Japanese graphic designer Rikako Nagashima for Kinnasand Lab. Addressing the problem of waste, Nagashima looked at ink stains on printer paper while creating this abstract curtain collection. As stated b
Architecture & Design

Rikako Nagashima Designs SCRAP_CMYK Curtain Collection for Kinnasand Lab

Scrap_CMYK is a curtain collection created by the Japanese graphic designer Rikako Nagashima for Kinnasand Lab. Addressing the problem of waste, Nagashima looked at ink stains on printer paper while creating this abstract curtain collection. As stated by Kinnasand lab, the collection, “comprises four designs and a plain base fabric made out of 100 percent recycled polyester.”  To be presented at the upcoming Milan Design Week that is going to be held from April 9 to 14, 2019, the SCRAP_CMYK collection features streaks of uneven color based on the patterns found on scraps of paper leftover from the offset printing process. As described by Kinnasand lab, “With Scrap_CMYK, Rikako Nagashima takes inspiration from and gives new life to, ‘waste’ test-print paper sheets and their accidental patterns. These were produced during the off-set printing process while fine-tuning colors.” Talking about this project during a recent interview with dezeen, Nagashima said, “When producing graphic materials, scrap papers – which are called yaregami – are produced during the printing process. We used the ink stains on them as a motif for this textile collection.” The designer also said that she came up with the idea after observing the sheer amount of inky paper leftover at her graphic design studio in Tokyo on a daily basis. “When we run the printer, the printouts are inevitably blurry at the beginning. Usually, we perform an initial run until the printer gets stabilized by feeding paper to absorb excessive inks. We have a large stock of yaregami at our office. So we picked out some attractive colors and shapes out of these, which we scanned and used as the basis to create textile designs,” Nagashima further added, explaining the process. Further details about the collection provided by Kinnasand Lab reveals that the fabric used in the collection is made of recycled polyester produced from plastic bottles. Each piece is printed with irregular repeats of a rectangular pattern and features vivid accents of blues, pinks, and yellows. These correspond with the cyan blue, magenta pink, and yellow of the CMYK color model used in color printing, giving the collection its name. Talking about the choice of the fabric, Nagashima said, “The collection aims to demonstrate that design can result from waste, and waste can result from design… Because our textile designs are created from ink stains on yaregami, I thought it would be nice to use fabric also associated with recycling.” The SCRAP_CMYK collection will be presented as part of an installation called “Scrap and Reprint,” at Milan Design Week, which will see the Kinnasand booth transformed into a giant offset printer with three pairs of elevated cylinders and a year’s worth of scrap paper from Nagashima’s design practice seemingly fed through it. The Swedish design studio, Kinnasand Lab produces subtle yet clear Nordic designs for contemporary homes. Designed by Creative Director Isa Glink, its collections have received a number of prestigious national and international design awards, including the German Design Award, the Interior Innovation Award, the ICFF Editors Award, the Designpreis der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, and the Red Dot Design Award.  https://www.blouinartinfo.com/              Founder: Louise Blouin

A peek into Carpenters Workshop Gallery collection for 2019 PAD Paris

For 2019 PAD Paris, Carpenters Workshop Gallery is showcasing 12 pieces by Nacho Carbonell including a new table light collection as part of his “Light Mesh” series, made from glass and bronze for the first time.The display shows a diversity of cocoon-lik
Architecture & Design

A peek into Carpenters Workshop Gallery collection for 2019 PAD Paris

For 2019 PAD Paris, Carpenters Workshop Gallery is showcasing 12 pieces by Nacho Carbonell including a new table light collection as part of his “Light Mesh” series, made from glass and bronze for the first time.The display shows a diversity of cocoon-like sculptures with organic shapes that evoke surreal treelike forms and create a similar feeling and space to a botanical garden.Carbonell is renowned for questioning conventional ideas of functional product design and exploring the tension between design and art. His work has been shown around the world and is part of museum collections including Groningen Museum in Netherlands, Fonds national d’art contemporain in France, 21 21 Design Sight in Japan and MINT Museum in the US. His work has been exhibited several times at The Salon Del Mobile in Milan and will be part of Carpenters Workshop Gallery’s “Dysfunctional” exhibition in Venice this year. His studio is based in Eindhoven in the Netherlands.Carpenters Workshop Gallery transcends the notion of classism regarding art and design. It is one of the best galleries focused on Contemporary art. The gallery’s vocation is to produce and exhibit functional sculptures made by artists and designers going beyond their means of conventional expressions. The gallery represents international and emerging artists and designers, all well established. The gallery engages actively in masterpieces’ research and production exhibited in limited numbers. The selection relies on a tangible reflexion based on emotional, artistic and historic research.It was born from the friendship of Julien Lombrail and Loic Le Gaillard that decided to bring a new life to a former Carpenter’s Workshop in London’s Chelsea in 2006. After the initial success, they opened a second space in Mayfair in 2008. In 2011 the duo opened 600 sq mt. Parisian gallery in the historic district of the Marais, in a private town house, which accommodated the Galerie de France.The year 2015 hallmarked a decisive turning point for the Carpenters Workshop Gallery with the opening of Carpenters Workshop Roissy, 8000 sq. mt. space dedicated to artistic research and development, gathering the elite of arts’ craftsmen commemorating the French Art Deco heritage. The gallery is currently representing a new space in New York confirming its strong leadership and positioning itself as a major international art and design gallery.The PAD Paris 2019 will run from April 3 through April 7, 2019, at Jardin des Tuileries, Facing 234 rue de Rivoli, Opposite rue de Castiglione, 75001 Paris, France. For details about the gallery, visit: http://www.carpentersworkshopgallery.com/Click on the slideshow for a sneak peek at the collection.         https://www.blouinartinfo.com/              Founder: Louise Blouin

Pair Of Louis XIV Gilt-Bronze Commodes Gets High Estimate at Sotheby’s

A pair of Louis XIV gilt-bronze mounted Boulle tortoiseshell, brass, mother-of-pearl and tin marquetry commodes, attributed to Nicolas Sageot will go under the hammer at Sotheby’s upcoming sale, “Style : Mobilier, Objets D’art Et Orfevrerie” that wil
Architecture & Design

Pair Of Louis XIV Gilt-Bronze Commodes Gets High Estimate at Sotheby’s

A pair of Louis XIV gilt-bronze mounted Boulle tortoiseshell, brass, mother-of-pearl and tin marquetry commodes, attributed to Nicolas Sageot will go under the hammer at Sotheby’s upcoming sale, “Style : Mobilier, Objets D’art Et Orfevrerie” that will be held on April 9, 2019, in Paris. The pre-auction estimate of the drawers is 150,000 EUR — 250,000 EUR, and it will be presented in lot 45 at the auction. “This pair of commodes, remarkable by their quality and by the abundance of their marquetry decoration shows similarities with other commodes originating from the production of Nicolas Sageot (1666-1701). The latter has been recorded as being active as early as 1690, and was registered at the Grande rue du Faubourg Saint-Antoine in 1698. He worked as an “ouvrier libre” or a free craftsman before being admitted into the cabinet makers corporation. His production includes primarily armoires, commodes, and bureaux all decorated with tortoiseshell and brass marquetry in the style of Andre-Charles Boulle (1642-1732) of whom he became the foremost competitor,” states the auction house. The present commode has opening with five drawers, and it is decorated in the style of Berain, while the top with a figure of Apollo on his chariot (regilt; some gilt-bronze ornaments of later date). Sotheby’s further added to the details and mentioned in their auction release, “Our commode shows strong similarities with the two commodes in the Wallace Collection in London and which are recorded under the references F39 and F408. The rectilinear architecture and the pilasters of our commodes as well as of the F39 commode from the Wallace Collection are reminiscent of the bureaux created at the end of the 17th century and suggest a date of creation around 1700.The marquetry decoration is clearly inspired from the works of Jean Berain (1640-1711), one the most influential ornamental designers at the court of Louis XIV. Starting from 1670 he was at the service of the French Crown as engraver and was given the title in 1674 of Architecte Dessinateur de la Chambre et du Cabinet du Roi, his mission consisting in providing drawing projects for royal celebrations and festivities. In 1690 he was named chief decorator of the apartments of the Louvre in collaboration with Andre-Charles Boulle. His drawings for furniture, panellings and fireplaces were brought together in ornament compilations.” https://www.blouinartinfo.com/              Founder: Louise Blouin

Tracks Architectes Designs Timber-clad Kindergarten with Gabled Forms

The Paris-based architecture studio Tracks Architectes has designed a long run of gabled volumes clad in honey-colored wood for a kindergarten in France. Called “La Ruche,” which translates as “The Beehive,” these kindergarten blocks are located in th
Architecture & Design

Tracks Architectes Designs Timber-clad Kindergarten with Gabled Forms

The Paris-based architecture studio Tracks Architectes has designed a long run of gabled volumes clad in honey-colored wood for a kindergarten in France. Called “La Ruche,” which translates as “The Beehive,” these kindergarten blocks are located in the village of Perthes-en-Gatinais. As described by the studio in its project note, “La Ruche” borrowed its simple geometry from the local architecture. Each pitched unit sits on one level, with widths and lengths altered slightly depending on internal requirements. The kindergarten is in an area that is part of the Gatinais Regional Natural Park (PNRGF). “Given the bucolic surroundings, the school buildings have been designed to be as visually generous as possible, looking out to a small wooded promenade to the north and an educational garden space to the south,” described the project note by the studio.  The project, which was completed by Tracks Architectes in just 10 months to minimize disturbance to the park, draws inspiration from the natural elements of its surroundings. Thus, as stated by the studio in its project note, insect and animal motifs sit on each gable and are used inside the kindergarten as a signage system. Internally, simple wooden cladding and white walls create bright, open spaces. Skylights work with the gable windows to draw in as much natural light as possible. The studio adds, “Each form is finished with timber-plank cladding, arranged vertically on the sides and in a 45-degree pattern to match the rooflines on the gables. The pitched roof of 45 degrees creates a house like a child would draw: simple, iconic, graphic…All indoor spaces, designed with the ladder of childhood as a major reference, are cradled in natural light to create bright, warm spaces.” A wooden-framed opening at the center of this run of buildings creates a covered yard extending into the playground and garden, connecting the two sides of the site. A similar area to the east of the plan provides a covered parking area. As stated in the project note, the architects have used a linear layout to retain the school’s surroundings as a well-used public route. As mentioned by Tracks Architectes, the project was named at the “Prize of the First Work of the Silver quarter 2018.” Tracks Architectes is a Paris-based architecture studio partnered by architects Moise Boucherie and Jeremy Griffon. The studio has completed several interesting projects across France and internationally. Works by Tracks Architectes featured in the exhibition titled “THE MANIFEST ARCHITECTURE” at the ENSA Bretagne in Rennes, held in 2018.  https://www.blouinartinfo.com/              Founder: Louise Blouin

“Useful/Beautiful: Why Craft Matters” at Harewood House Reiterates the Relevance of Craft

Contemporary craft has been woven into the grand interiors of Harewood House, Yorkshire, as part of its first craft and design biennial. Through an exhibition titled, “Useful/Beautiful: Why Craft Matters,” the biennial explores the relevance of craft in t
Architecture & Design

“Useful/Beautiful: Why Craft Matters” at Harewood House Reiterates the Relevance of Craft

Contemporary craft has been woven into the grand interiors of Harewood House, Yorkshire, as part of its first craft and design biennial. Through an exhibition titled, “Useful/Beautiful: Why Craft Matters,” the biennial explores the relevance of craft in the present digital age. The exhibition is on view through September 1, 2019. As per details provided by Harewood House, a country estate in Yorkshire that was built in the 1780s as a show home, the exhibition “showcases work created by 26 makers based in the UK. The exhibitors range from small independent craftspeople working in solo practices, to companies that hand-make products on an industrial scale.” Describing the exhibition that has been curated by design critic Hugo Macdonald, the website states, “Launching the very first Harewood Biennial, the exhibition aims to challenge preconceptions about the role craft can play in culture, identity, and society.” Spread across the house’s state floor and below-stairs level, each room hosts a different exhibitor. Interestingly, the exhibits in each room are in some way related to their particular location. For instance, paper crafts have been displayed in the library, and garden tools in the Garden Room of the estate. Next to each display is a passage of text written by the designer that explains why they think that craft is still relevant today. As curator Macdonald explains, “From jeans to pocket knives to reclaimed furniture to glass sculptures, every exhibitor has a story to tell. This is why we have asked each craftsperson to respond to the statement: why craft matters to them and today.” The exhibition will also display three site-specific installations by designers Max Lamb, Anthony Burrill, and Faye Toogood that were commissioned by the biennial authorities. Lamb’s 24-square-meter rug made up of interconnecting amoebic shapes is displayed in the drawing-room; while outside the house, Anthony Burrill has erected a four-metre-high Tyvek-wrapped scaffold tower that answers the exhibition’s central question of why craft matters with the words: ‘We are who we make,’ ‘We are what we make,’ ‘We are when we make,’ and ‘We are how we make’ written on each of its four sides. Toogood, who was tasked with filling the 76-foot gallery space that extends across the whole west end of the house selected 30 pieces from her extensive archive of fashion, product, and furniture design to display across a huge industrial steel shelving unit. Apart from the commissioned works, the exhibition displays several other interesting pieces of craft such as leather vases by Simon Hasan; series of glass vessels by Edinburgh-based designer Juli Bolaños-Durman; and brightly colored and upholstered chairs by upcycled furniture designer Yinka Ilori, which are inspired by real-life characters from the designer’s childhood. “Useful/Beautiful: Why Craft Matters” will be on view through September 1, 2019, at Harewood House, Harewood, Leeds LS17 9LG.  https://www.blouinartinfo.com/              Founder: Louise Blouin

Peter Barber Architect Transform McGrath Road

Peter Barber Architect's new project features a block of multiple shared-ownership homes around a central courtyard in Stratford, London.The square comprises 28 little tower houses, creating a beautiful street corner in East London and laid out around a pictu
Architecture & Design

Peter Barber Architect Transform McGrath Road

Peter Barber Architect's new project features a block of multiple shared-ownership homes around a central courtyard in Stratford, London.The square comprises 28 little tower houses, creating a beautiful street corner in East London and laid out around a picturesque tree-lined square. Houses have double height arcaded frontages; 1, 2 or 3 bedrooms; and a top floor living room and roof terrace. Inspired by the Victorian era, the square comes through as a reinterpretation of the Victorian back-to-back housing typology popular in England's rapidly expanding industrial cities during the early 20th century.The housing at McGrath Road aims at making the most of the density provided by back-to-backs, which were squeezed in tightly, with single-aspect spaces, no gardens, and few windows. It also expands the standard of both indoor and outdoor spaces.«Back-to-back housing was the default typology for low cost high density housing in many northern and midland industrial cities during their rapid expansion in the nineteenth century. Hundreds of thousands were built in cities like Manchester, Liverpool, Nottingham, Birmingham and Leeds, though strangely it was rare in London. Their construction was outlawed in the 1909 Housing Act although some local authorities sanctioned their continued construction as recently as the late 1930’s,»  stated the architecture studio.Director of the studio Peter Barber commented, «In my view the type had a great many benefits..They were cheap to build and therefore relatively inexpensive to rent, and were arranged along streets and in courts which assisted in creating the potential for neighborliness.»While the western block of the project uses a back-to-back plan, with units arranged symmetrically against one another but stacked to allow for dual-aspect openings, on the opposite side, the slimmer eastern block consists of a single run of homes, and together the two blocks surround a central planted courtyard.The square's northern and western heights bend around the road corner, with an exterior explained by profound, curved block uncovers that outline windows and an entryway into each home and give a secured, semi-private space.According to the architecture studio, «They are a radical reworking of “back of pavement terraces” and “back-to-back” house types.»Peter Barber has worked with Richard Rogers, Will Alsop, and Jestico+Whiles prior to establishing his own practice in 1989. He is currently a lecturer and reader in architecture at the University of Westminster. Barber has lectured about the work of the Practice at many institutions, including the Royal Institute of British Architects, the Architectural League in New York, and numerous international and domestic university schools of architecture including Helsinki, Pretoria, Ahmedabad, Mumbai, Burma, Munich, Genoa Istanbul and Colombo as well as Oxford University and The Bartlett - University College London. https://www.blouinartinfo.com/              Founder: Louise Blouin

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