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Americans are checking their phones now more than ever, report says - CNET

Sixty-three percent of those surveyed by Deloitte are trying to cut back their screen time, but only around half of them are successful in doing so.

Politics

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Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein to leave Justice Department next month

It was only a matter of time before Donald Trump grasped the full implications of the 25th Amendment chatter early in his administration and wanted someone's head on a platter. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein already dodged that bullet once before, aft
Daily Kos

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein to leave Justice Department next month

It was only a matter of time before Donald Trump grasped the full implications of the 25th Amendment chatter early in his administration and wanted someone's head on a platter. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein already dodged that bullet once before, after initial reports surfaced last fall suggesting he had raised the idea of wearing a wire to document Trump's insanity. But the new book tour of former acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe has rung that bell again, and Rosenstein is reportedly headed for the Justice Department’s exit door in mid-March. Rosenstein, who both appointed special counsel Robert Mueller and has overseen his investigation into Russia's election interference, had been expected to leave once a new attorney general was appointed who would presumably take the lead on the Mueller probe going forward. That new attorney general, William Barr, was sworn in last week. And while Rosenstein doesn’t appear to have been forced out, he may as well git while the gittin’ is good. McCabe has gotten very clear in recent interviews about exactly what Rosenstein was implying when he spoke of wearing a wire to record Trump in the White House. He has said Rosenstein's comments were related to discussions of potentially using the 25th Amendment to topple Trump in the early days of his administration.  “[Rosenstein] said, ‘I never get searched when I go into the White House. I could easily wear a recording device. They wouldn’t know it was there,’” McCabe told CBS's 60 Minutes of a conversation he had with Rosenstein. “He was not joking,” McCabe added, noting that Rosenstein mentioned the prospect more than once. McCabe also said that he «never actually considered» following through with it, though he did discuss it with team members and the general counsel at the FBI. We’re probably not finished hearing about this episode. Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, who chairs the Senate Judiciary Committee, has said he plans to investigate McCabe's claim. 

McConnell has direct line to Trumpland for Kentucky bigwigs and contributors: his spouse Elaine Chao

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell appears to have a pretty great setup right now. He's in a position to give the Trump administration much of what the Russia asset wants, and the administration can return the favor. It helps that Elaine Chao, Trump's tra
Daily Kos

McConnell has direct line to Trumpland for Kentucky bigwigs and contributors: his spouse Elaine Chao

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell appears to have a pretty great setup right now. He's in a position to give the Trump administration much of what the Russia asset wants, and the administration can return the favor. It helps that Elaine Chao, Trump's transportation secretary, is also married to McConnell. That's good for his re-election prospects, it turns out, because Chao is in a position to help him out by granting all kinds of projects for Kentucky, his home state. Politico reports on a review by watchdog group American Oversight, which has obtained more than 800 pages of emails detailing communications between McConnell's office and Chao's. Chao has taken at least 10 meetings with politicians and business leaders from Kentucky, apparently in response to requests from her husband. And in some of those cases, the people got what they were asking for, «including infrastructure grants, the designation of an interstate highway and assistance in getting state funds for a highway project.» Among those he arranged meetings for are friends, former staffers, and big campaign donors, like maritime industry lobbyist Jim Adams (who is married to Kentucky state senator Julie Raque Adams, who conveniently used to work for McConnell. The Adamses donated $1,500 to McConnell's 2014 reelection campaign, according to FEC filings).  «We launched this investigation because we were intrigued by the president's selection of Elaine Chao as Transportation secretary,» executive director and founder of American Oversight Austin Evers told Politico. «The media and political class identified it as a savvy move to hire the spouse of the majority leader of the Senate. We wanted to see what that relationship looked like.» What it looks like, he said, is that «Secretary Chao built a political operation in her office to favor Kentucky.» While it's not uncommon for Cabinet officials and their designees to meet with home-state political and business leaders, Evers says that it looks like Chao and her staff «appear to go out of their way to make McConnell's Kentucky contacts 'feel special.'» Evidenced by one email from March 2017 requesting a meeting for Kentuckians for Better Transportation in which McConnell's representative asks that if Chao can't make the meeting, maybe «an assistant secretary or 2» could. «That way it is not taking up the Secretary's time but they feel special.» That particular meeting appeared on Chao's calendar on May 17. McConnell's spokesperson tells Politico that «the Leader regularly advocates for Kentuckians with Members of the Cabinet and agencies of the federal government.» They don't say whether they get the same kind of results out of the rest of the Cabinet.

A reporter asked Trump if he tried to interfere in the Cohen case and oof ... this pause

Taking a handful of questions in the Oval Office today, Donald Trump appeared tired and cranky. Judging by his Twitter rants, he isn’t sleeping well these days. Nor should he be sleeping well, because everything he’s touched in the last 10 years is now u
Daily Kos

A reporter asked Trump if he tried to interfere in the Cohen case and oof ... this pause

Taking a handful of questions in the Oval Office today, Donald Trump appeared tired and cranky. Judging by his Twitter rants, he isn’t sleeping well these days. Nor should he be sleeping well, because everything he’s touched in the last 10 years is now under investigation. And he has nobody to blame but himself, his own words, his own deeds, and his associations with a network of criminals and deplorables.  Just today the New York Times reported that, almost immediately after Trump announced Jeff Sessions’ former chief of staff, Matthew Whitaker, would be taking over as the acting attorney general, Trump picked up the phone to see if he could shake things up in the Southern District of New York, particularly regarding the lead prosecutor on the Cohen case.  As federal prosecutors in Manhattan gathered evidence late last year about President Trump’s role in silencing women with hush payments during the 2016 campaign, Mr. Trump called Matthew G. Whitaker, his newly installed attorney general, with a question. He asked whether Geoffrey S. Berman, the United States attorney for the Southern District of New York and a Trump ally, could be put in charge of the widening investigation, according to several American officials with direct knowledge of the call. Geoffrey Berman was a member of Donald Trump’s transition team. Curious that he wanted Berman specifically in charge of that investigation, no? At the White House today, a reporter asked Trump the following: “Did you ask acting attorney general Matthew Whitaker to change the leadership in the investigation of your former personal attorney, Michael Cohen?” Trump said, “Not at all,” but not before a seriously awkward pause.

Trump 'striking out' in the court of public opinion on his 'national emergency'

Most Americans know there isn't a national emergency at the nation's southern border and even more Americans disapprove of Donald Trump declaring one, according to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll. Overall, 61 percent of respondents in the poll disapprove
Daily Kos

Trump 'striking out' in the court of public opinion on his 'national emergency'

Most Americans know there isn't a national emergency at the nation's southern border and even more Americans disapprove of Donald Trump declaring one, according to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll. Overall, 61 percent of respondents in the poll disapprove of Trump's declaration and 58 percent also don't believe there's an emergency to be had, anyway. In addition, 60 percent support challenging Trump's action in court, as 16 states have now done, along with other advocacy groups. «All things related to the declaring of a national emergency, the president is striking out in the court of public opinion,» Lee Miringoff, director of the Marist Institute for Public Opinion, told NPR. «He's maintaining his base and little else.» In essence, the issue tracks along party lines, with Republicans mostly supporting Trump, Democrats adamantly opposing the move, and 61 percent of independents calling it a misuse of power. In other words, it's just one more way for Trump to polarize the nation.

We grew up afraid to be vulnerable: «Minding the Gap» helped me see my toxic boyhood masculinity

My dad taught me that crying was for suckas. Here's why Director Bing Liu forced me to rethink manhood
Salon: in-depth news, politics, business, technology & culture Salon

We grew up afraid to be vulnerable: «Minding the Gap» helped me see my toxic boyhood masculinity

My dad taught me that crying was for suckas. Here's why Director Bing Liu forced me to rethink manhood

Economics

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Blockchain technology to help verify natural diamonds

Scientists have developed a new method based on blockchain technology to help verify and trace natural diamonds, and fully guarantee their authenticity. In a situation where natural, synthetic and fake stones exist in the diamond market, the system could prot
Markets

Blockchain technology to help verify natural diamonds

Scientists have developed a new method based on blockchain technology to help verify and trace natural diamonds, and fully guarantee their authenticity. In a situation where natural, synthetic and fake stones exist in the diamond market, the system could protect the financial assets of market participants, said researchers from the National University of Science and Technology in Russia. The modern diamond industry is undergoing a period of global restructuring, they said. This expansion is explained by scientific achievements that are pushing for an increase in diamond volumes for potential applications, both for jewelery and industry. Modern synthetic diamonds are almost as good as natural diamonds in terms of quality and chemical composition. With these trends, gemologists often cannot distinguish a good synthetic diamond from a natural one. Taking into account the growth of the market and the multiple possible diamond origins, the guarantee of authenticity is becoming crucial. A ..

Science

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Porsche Taycan production forecast may be ‘conservative’

Porsche’s production forecast for its first all-electric vehicle may be too conservative, the company’s head of production said this week. Porsche has targeted 20,000 Taycan electric vehicles for the first year of production. But interest in the v
TechCrunch

Porsche Taycan production forecast may be ‘conservative’

Porsche’s production forecast for its first all-electric vehicle may be too conservative, the company’s head of production said this week. Porsche has targeted 20,000 Taycan electric vehicles for the first year of production. But interest in the vehicle could push those estimates higher, Albrecht Reimold, Porsche’s board member in charge of production, said in an internally […]

These hyper-efficient solar panels could actually live on your roof soon

The clean energy boffins in their labs are always upping the theoretical limit on how much power you can get out of sunshine, but us plebes actually installing solar cells are stuck with years-old tech that's not half as good as what they're seeing. This new
TechCrunch

These hyper-efficient solar panels could actually live on your roof soon

The clean energy boffins in their labs are always upping the theoretical limit on how much power you can get out of sunshine, but us plebes actually installing solar cells are stuck with years-old tech that's not half as good as what they're seeing. This new design from Insolight could be the one that changes all that.

How to block new antibiotic resistance gene

A new antimicrobial-resistance gene, VCC-1, a beta-lactamase gene, has been discovered in benign close relatives of virulent Vibrio cholerae, which causes cholera. Now, a team of Canadian researchers has found a way to block the VCC-1 enzyme, which disables t
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How to block new antibiotic resistance gene

A new antimicrobial-resistance gene, VCC-1, a beta-lactamase gene, has been discovered in benign close relatives of virulent Vibrio cholerae, which causes cholera. Now, a team of Canadian researchers has found a way to block the VCC-1 enzyme, which disables that resistance gene.

The SEC is looking to make it easier for any company to test the IPO waters

Under the leadership of its newest chairman, Jay Clayton, the SEC has for the last two years made it clear that it wants more companies to go public already. A new proposal, revealed today, may get it closer to that objective. Specifically, the agency has pro
TechCrunch

The SEC is looking to make it easier for any company to test the IPO waters

Under the leadership of its newest chairman, Jay Clayton, the SEC has for the last two years made it clear that it wants more companies to go public already. A new proposal, revealed today, may get it closer to that objective. Specifically, the agency has proposed giving any company that’s exploring a potential IPO to […]

FDA warning brings controversial young blood transfusion company to a halt

On Tuesday, the FDA issued a warning to anyone who might be inclined to give their old bones a jolt with fresh blood harvested from the young. The idea is pretty far from mainstream, even in Silicon Valley, where the ultra-wealthy have a keen interest in the
TechCrunch

FDA warning brings controversial young blood transfusion company to a halt

On Tuesday, the FDA issued a warning to anyone who might be inclined to give their old bones a jolt with fresh blood harvested from the young. The idea is pretty far from mainstream, even in Silicon Valley, where the ultra-wealthy have a keen interest in the cutting edge of life-extension science. Still, there’s apparently […]

Invest in AI’s ethical future

I recently talked to a group of kids about AI. I asked them to come up with ideas for how AI could be used. I was struck by their genuine interest in creating AI solutions that would help people.
TechCrunch

Invest in AI’s ethical future

I recently talked to a group of kids about AI. I asked them to come up with ideas for how AI could be used. I was struck by their genuine interest in creating AI solutions that would help people.

Culture

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The Latest: California governor accuses Trump of retribution

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) - The Latest on the Trump administration calling for California to return federal money from its high-speed rail project (all times local): 4:35 p.m. California Gov. Gavin Newsom says the Trump administration is engaging in «poli
www.washingtontimes.com stories: Travel

The Latest: California governor accuses Trump of retribution

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) - The Latest on the Trump administration calling for California to return federal money from its high-speed rail project (all times local): 4:35 p.m. California Gov. Gavin Newsom says the Trump administration is engaging in «political retribution» by trying to take back $3.5 billion granted for the ...

Trump administration plans to cancel $929 million for California high-speed rail and wants state to

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) - Trump administration plans to cancel $929 million for California high-speed rail and wants state to return $2.5 billion.
www.washingtontimes.com stories: Travel

Trump administration plans to cancel $929 million for California high-speed rail and wants state to

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) - Trump administration plans to cancel $929 million for California high-speed rail and wants state to return $2.5 billion.

Trump wants California to pay back billions for bullet train

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) - The Trump administration said Tuesday that it plans to cancel $929 million awarded to California's high-speed rail project and wants the state to return an additional $2.5 billion that it has already spent. The U.S. Department of Tra
www.washingtontimes.com stories: Travel

Trump wants California to pay back billions for bullet train

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) - The Trump administration said Tuesday that it plans to cancel $929 million awarded to California's high-speed rail project and wants the state to return an additional $2.5 billion that it has already spent. The U.S. Department of Transportation announcement follows through on President Donald Trump's threats ...

UK expands no-fly zone for drones around airports

LONDON (AP) - The no-fly zone for drones around British airports is being extended to 5 kilometers (3.1 miles) in an attempt to avert disruptions like the December groundings of flights at Gatwick Airport, officials said Wednesday. The Department for Transpor
www.washingtontimes.com stories: Travel

UK expands no-fly zone for drones around airports

LONDON (AP) - The no-fly zone for drones around British airports is being extended to 5 kilometers (3.1 miles) in an attempt to avert disruptions like the December groundings of flights at Gatwick Airport, officials said Wednesday. The Department for Transport said the zone will widen on March 13 from ...

Denver airport renovation project faces possible delay

DENVER (AP) - A new report says the ongoing renovation project at Denver International Airport could be delayed up to 10 months after tests show weaker-than-expected concrete in the main floor of the airport's terminal. The Denver Post reports that airport sp
www.washingtontimes.com stories: Travel

Denver airport renovation project faces possible delay

DENVER (AP) - A new report says the ongoing renovation project at Denver International Airport could be delayed up to 10 months after tests show weaker-than-expected concrete in the main floor of the airport's terminal. The Denver Post reports that airport spokeswoman Stacey Stegman says the extent of the delay ...

Grand Canyon looking into possible radiation exposure

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) - The Grand Canyon says it's investigating whether anyone was exposed to radiation at unsafe levels while samples of uranium ore sat in plastic buckets in a park research building. National Park Service spokeswoman Vanessa Lacayo says th
www.washingtontimes.com stories: Travel

Grand Canyon looking into possible radiation exposure

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) - The Grand Canyon says it's investigating whether anyone was exposed to radiation at unsafe levels while samples of uranium ore sat in plastic buckets in a park research building. National Park Service spokeswoman Vanessa Lacayo says the three 5-gallon buckets have been removed from the building ...

Sport

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No. 5 Tennessee wins 58-46 as Vandy loses 14th straight

Grant Williams had 14 points and 11 rebounds, and No. 5 Tennessee beat Vanderbilt 58-46 in the Volunteers' first game since losing their No. 1 ranking
FOX Sports Digital

No. 5 Tennessee wins 58-46 as Vandy loses 14th straight

Grant Williams had 14 points and 11 rebounds, and No. 5 Tennessee beat Vanderbilt 58-46 in the Volunteers' first game since losing their No. 1 ranking

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