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Trump is 'more than happy' for public to see Mueller report? Yeah, don't bet on that

Believe this one when you see it, but Donald Trump is supposedly willing to have the full Mueller report released to the public. Not that he’s going to do it, but if his hand-picked attorney general did it, Trump would be okay with it.  Trump is “more t
Daily Kos

Trump is 'more than happy' for public to see Mueller report? Yeah, don't bet on that

Believe this one when you see it, but Donald Trump is supposedly willing to have the full Mueller report released to the public. Not that he’s going to do it, but if his hand-picked attorney general did it, Trump would be okay with it.  Trump is “more than happy for any of this stuff to come out because he knows exactly what did and what didn’t happen and now frankly the rest of America knows,” according to White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders. “They know there was no collusion, they know there was no obstruction and it’s a complete and total exoneration of the president.” So … because it’s a “complete and total exoneration,” Trump is willing to have the public see the report his own attorney general quoted as saying “does not exonerate him”? However, “more than happy” doesn’t extend to Trump releasing the report himself. It’s just that if Attorney General William Barr, chosen in large part for his hostility to the investigation, chooses to release it, Trump’s public position is that he wouldn’t mind. As for Trump’s private position as communicated directly to Barr, we’ll just have to guess. Again: Believe it when you see it, where that second “it” is the full, uncensored Mueller report.

The Barr letter is not the Mueller report—it's a gift to Donald Trump

On Friday afternoon, Attorney General William Barr announced that he was in receipt of the concluding document from special counsel Robert Mueller. After 40 hours of tense silence and speculation, Barr delivered a letter to Congress on Sunday providing a “s
Daily Kos

The Barr letter is not the Mueller report—it's a gift to Donald Trump

On Friday afternoon, Attorney General William Barr announced that he was in receipt of the concluding document from special counsel Robert Mueller. After 40 hours of tense silence and speculation, Barr delivered a letter to Congress on Sunday providing a “summary” of the contents of Mueller’s statement. In his letter, Barr states that Mueller concluded that, while Russia deliberately interfered in the 2016 election both by planting false stories in social media and by hacking into computers to “obtain” emails, the special counsel “did not find that any U.S. person or Trump campaign official or associate conspired or knowingly coordinated” with the Russian effort. On the topic of obstruction, the letter states that Mueller did something unusual: He laid out a number of actions that possibly represented obstruction, but did not provide indictments. As a result, Barr, in consultation with Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, concluded that the “evidence was not sufficient to conclude the President committed an obstruction of justice offense.” All indications are that there are to be no more indictments, including no sealed indictments, resulting from the special counsel investigation. No further actions will result.  As might be expected, the contents of the letter have resulted in both wild celebration—and wild accusations—from the Right, with Trump claiming “total exoneration,” and multiple Republicans in both the Senate and the House accusing both Democrats and the media of “lying” and leading the public on a two-year, what else, “witch hunt.” On the other hand, it’s immediately notable that Barr’s fewer-than-four-page letter contains not a single full sentence from the document produced by Mueller, and one of the few fragments that is provided states that, “while this report does not conclude the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him”—in stark disagreement with Trump’s claims.  The letter from Barr provides a list of hefty statistics about the number of documents examined, subpoenas deployed, and witnesses questioned in the course of the investigation, all of which only makes Barr’s highly abbreviated summary even less satisfying. On the issue of obstruction, Barr’s letter does not say that Mueller left it to the attorney general to determine charges, no matter how it’s being framed in reports. It says only that Mueller “determined not to make a traditional prosecutorial judgement,” and then Barr and Rosenstein “determined that the evidence developed … was not sufficient to establish” a crime. That is a very different thing. The description of “collusion” in the letter is very tightly prescribed, leaving off the table entire areas of possible cooperation with Russia, and describing the situation in very black-and-white terms that may not reflect the findings from the special counsel.

Mueller report 'does not exonerate him,' but Trump follows the plan: Declare victory and attack

Donald Trump planned all along to use anything short of an indictment from special counsel Robert Mueller as a chance to declare victory and attack Democrats. And guess what? Trump is using not just the absence of an indictment, but Attorney General Willia
Daily Kos

Mueller report 'does not exonerate him,' but Trump follows the plan: Declare victory and attack

Donald Trump planned all along to use anything short of an indictment from special counsel Robert Mueller as a chance to declare victory and attack Democrats. And guess what? Trump is using not just the absence of an indictment, but Attorney General William Barr’s sketchy and slanted summary of Mueller’s report to … declare victory and attack Democrats. What a surprise. When Trump allies claim that Trump was exonerated, they are in direct conflict with one of the most important things Barr’s letter quoted from Mueller: that “while this report does not conclude the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him.” It. Also. Does. Not. Exonerate. Him. Everything Trump says on this subject, such as, “This was an illegal takedown that failed and hopefully somebody is going to be looking at their other side,” is an attempt to get the media to ignore that the actual Mueller report is not public and everything we know about it comes from a hasty summary provided by an attorney general chosen in part for his hostility to the investigation. Donald Trump’s campaign manager, deputy campaign manager, personal attorney, and national security adviser have all been convicted of or pleaded guilty to crimes related to this investigation, the final report of which “does not exonerate” Trump. But Republicans screaming about how this was some plot by Democrats—involving, for some reason, a Republican special counsel—will dominate the headlines. And that’s their plan. That’s the only plan they ever had. Declare victory and attack Democrats, in an effort to distract from the fact that we don’t actually have the Mueller report, and even Trump’s own attorney general felt it necessary to quote that part about Trump not being exonerated.

What's behind Bill Barr's whitewash? We need to see the full Mueller report to know for sure

Attorney general's letter to Congress was brilliant political rhetoric. But too many questions remain unanswered
Salon: in-depth news, politics, business, technology & culture Salon

What's behind Bill Barr's whitewash? We need to see the full Mueller report to know for sure

Attorney general's letter to Congress was brilliant political rhetoric. But too many questions remain unanswered

Morning Digest: Lori Lightfoot remains the clear favorite in Chicago's soon-approaching mayoral race

The Daily Kos Elections Morning Digest is compiled by David Nir, Jeff Singer, Stephen Wolf, Carolyn Fiddler, and Matt Booker, with additional contributions from David Jarman, Steve Singiser, Daniel Donner, James Lambert, David Beard, and Arjun Jaikumar. Lead
Daily Kos

Morning Digest: Lori Lightfoot remains the clear favorite in Chicago's soon-approaching mayoral race

The Daily Kos Elections Morning Digest is compiled by David Nir, Jeff Singer, Stephen Wolf, Carolyn Fiddler, and Matt Booker, with additional contributions from David Jarman, Steve Singiser, Daniel Donner, James Lambert, David Beard, and Arjun Jaikumar. Leading Off ● Chicago, IL Mayor: Chicago's April 2 mayoral election is coming up quickly, and former federal prosecutor Lori Lightfoot remains the heavy favorite to defeat Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle, who spent much of the race as the frontrunner. A Lightfoot victory would make Chicago the largest city in America to ever elect a gay mayor. While Lightfoot only led Preckwinkle 18-16 in the Feb. 28 nonpartisan primary, the few polls we've seen have found her far ahead and she's also picked up the lion's share of endorsements over the last month. Preckwinkle also stopped advertising on TV just as early voting began, which is perhaps the biggest sign that the general election is going poorly for her. But just how did things get to be so bleak for Preckwinkle? Chicago Magazine's Edward McClelland and the Chicago Sun-Times' Fran Spielman each take a look at the contest. McClelland writes that Lightfoot is consolidating support from both progressive voters in the Lakefront and more conservative «white ethnics from the neighborhoods on Chicago's fringes,» two groups that often don't see eye to eye in city politics. However, animosity towards Preckwinkle, who is one of the more high-profile politicians in local politics, helps explain this unusual coalition. Preckwinkle serves as chair of the Cook County Democratic Primary, an important part of the old Chicago political machine that Lakefront leaders and voters often vigorously oppose. It doesn't help that Preckwinkle has attracted plenty of scrutiny since the year began over her ties to Alderman Ed Burke, a longtime member of the machine who was indicted for corruption at the start of the year. At the same time, McClelland writes that plenty of conservative «law and order» voters also dislike Preckwinkle for her ties to Cook County State's Attorney Kim Foxx, who has often clashed with the police and who is often caricatured as a «cop hater.» An unnamed political consultant who isn't affiliated with either campaign also tells Spielman that Preckwinkle has struggled in the predominantly black South Side because of lingering anger with her support for the soda tax, which she pushed through in 2017 but was soon repealed. Lightfoot, by contrast, is running for elected office for the first time and doesn't have a long record to attack. McClelland writes that she's appealed to progressives by joining them in denouncing the machine, and that conservative voters «like her because they believe that as a former president of the Police Board, she'll be sympathetic to first responders.» Spielman also writes that when the Chicago Firefighters Union Local 2 and two aldermen who used to be firefighters backed Lightfoot, it acted as «a signal to white ethnic voters on the Northwest Side to support Lightfoot.» Money has been a big issue for Preckwinkle. Spielman writes that, while she was hoping to consolidate labor support during the general election, she got some bad news quickly when the Chicago Federation of Labor announced that they would remain neutral. She continues by writing that this encouraged trade unions that had supported state Comptroller Susana Mendoza in the primary to endorse and contribute to Lightfoot, as well as the firefighters' union. By contrast, Preckwinkle's major donors appear to have decided that she's no longer a good investment. The Chicago Tribune's Juan Perez wrote on March 19 that, while the local SIEU gave Preckwinkle $2.42 million for the primary, they'd only contributed $878,000 for round two. Of that amount, $750,000 was «reported the day after the first election and cashed beforehand,» so the SEIU hasn't exactly been spending much to boost Preckwinkle for round two. A trio of unaligned strategists, all of whom went unnamed, also told Spielman that Preckwinkle's strategy has only hurt her since the primary ended last month. Preckwinkle had been on the receiving end of plenty of attacks and scrutiny for months while Lightfoot, who had languished in the single digits for most of the primary, had yet to attract much negative attention. Preckwinkle needed to fix that, but her early attacks on Lightfoot in the general election might have been the wrong approach. Preckwinkle quickly went up with a negative ad that tried to portray Lightfoot as a «wealthy corporate lawyer» who was close to Republicans and had «overruled investigators to justify police shootings.» However, one strategist told Spielman that this ad «was a kitchen sink ad that was all over the place. Spread too thin,» and, «It wasn't pointed enough in what they were trying to say.» The days after the primary may have been Preckwinkle's only opportunity to define Lightfoot while she still had the resources to do so. Indeed, Politico writes that, in the first two weeks after the primary, Preckwinkle outspent Lightfoot $600,000 to $450,000. However, in the week of March 10, Lightfoot outspent Preckwinkle $450,000 to $50,000, and the county board president was off the air altogether in the following week. Preckwinkle also attracted negative attention at a debate when she was asked to say one thing she admired about her opponent and responded that she credited Lightfoot for being «open and honest about her LGBTQ orientation.» Lightfoot and her allies denounced the comment, with Lightfoot declaring, «I can only hope that she wasn't blowing some kind of dog whistle,» and, «It almost doesn't matter what the intent was. The effect was to some―I found out about it from folks who heard it that way.» Preckwinkle insisted this was a sincere compliment, but whatever her intentions were, the controversy seems to have cost her precious days she couldn't afford to lose. Senate ● AL-Sen: The radical anti-tax Club for Growth has been loudly touting Rep. Mo Brooks as a potential GOP candidate against Democratic Sen. Doug Jones, and he seems a bit more interested than he did a month ago. Brooks told AL.com's Paul Gattis that the Senate Conservatives Fund, which often boosts anti-establishment candidates in GOP primaries, has «pledged, so far, $3.7 million in support» if he runs. The congressman still said that he needs to see a bit more before he runs, declaring that he has been «considering the polling data and the strong offers of financial support but so far, they have not been sufficient to persuade me to run for the Senate,» but adding, «I haven't made a final decision.» Last month, Brooks said that «[i]t would take some kind of seismic event» to get him in the contest, but right now at least, he seems interested in running even if Poseidon hasn't launched an earthquake off the coast of Mobile that registers on the Richter scale as «Mo Brooks for Senate.» There's still no word when Brooks expects to decide, though Gattis writes that «there is no signal from the Huntsville Republican congressman that he plans to join the race any time soon.» ● TN-Sen: Former Gov. Bill Haslam has been mulling running here since GOP Sen. Lamar Alexander announced in December that he would retire, and Politico reports that Mike Pence encouraged him to jump in at a recent meeting at the White House. While Haslam said earlier this year that he would decide «probably sometime in March,» Politico writes that he «will decide sometime in the next month.» House ● PA-08: Wealthy banker John Chrin, who lost to Democratic Rep. Matt Cartwright by a 55-45 margin last year, has filed new paperwork with the FEC that could presage a rematch, though he has not yet spoken publicly about his intentions. Pennsylvania's 8th, located in the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre region, voted for Donald Trump by a 53-44 margin, a big swing from Barack Obama's 55-43 win there in 2012 and the main reason Republicans thought they might have a shot at this seat in 2018. That shift also made Cartwright one of just 13 Democrats to represent a red district prior to the midterms. Now, though, following last year's blue wave, 31 Democrats sit in districts Trump won, so Cartwright may no longer be as compelling a target. And Chrin, who self-funded almost $1.7 million, doesn't really have the sort of background that's in-tune with a heavily working-class area like this one: He spent decades at the Wall Street firm of JPMorgan Chase and is worth as much as $86 million. Republicans may therefore look to alternative recruits for 2020. Mayoral ● Dallas, TX Mayor: On Wednesday, Hillary Clinton endorsed Regina Montoya, an attorney who served as director of the Office of Intergovernmental Affairs during the Clinton administration. Montoya, who also has the support of EMILY's List, is one of several candidates competing in the May 4 nonpartisan primary.

Economics

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Sebi clarifies on MF expenses, commissions for first time investors

Only the first SIP purchased by the investor shall be eligible for upfronting and in case of multiple SIPs being purchased on different dates
Markets

Sebi clarifies on MF expenses, commissions for first time investors

Only the first SIP purchased by the investor shall be eligible for upfronting and in case of multiple SIPs being purchased on different dates

Seasonal demand uptick critical for consumer electrical firms

Players with a diversified portfolio such as Havells are better placed compared to pure AC players given near term uncertainties
Markets

Seasonal demand uptick critical for consumer electrical firms

Players with a diversified portfolio such as Havells are better placed compared to pure AC players given near term uncertainties

Multi-deal Monday: Apple Watch, Fire tablets, crazy-cheap coffee and more - CNET

Black Friday-level pricing on popular gear, plus a sweet selfie stick for $15 and maybe the best coffee deal ever.
CNET News

Multi-deal Monday: Apple Watch, Fire tablets, crazy-cheap coffee and more - CNET

Black Friday-level pricing on popular gear, plus a sweet selfie stick for $15 and maybe the best coffee deal ever.

Apple event: How to watch and what to expect - CNET

What we know so far about Apple's TV series, subscription news service and everything else it could announce at its next launch event today, March 25.
CNET News

Apple event: How to watch and what to expect - CNET

What we know so far about Apple's TV series, subscription news service and everything else it could announce at its next launch event today, March 25.

Science

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ISS Daily Summary Report – 3/22/2019

USOS Extravehicular Activity (EVA) #52: Today Anne McLain (EV-1) and Nick Hague (EV-2) exited the Joint Airlock and performed US EVA #52 (Lithium Ion Battery R&R EVA #1) with a Phased Elapsed Time (PET) of 6h 39m. The primary purpose of this EVA was to fa
ISS On-Orbit Status Report

ISS Daily Summary Report – 3/22/2019

USOS Extravehicular Activity (EVA) #52: Today Anne McLain (EV-1) and Nick Hague (EV-2) exited the Joint Airlock and performed US EVA #52 (Lithium Ion Battery R&R EVA #1) with a Phased Elapsed Time (PET) of 6h 39m. The primary purpose of this EVA was to facilitate the installation of new P4 Li-Ion batteries and completed …

Scalyr launches PowerQueries for advanced log management

Log management service Scalyr today announced the beta launch of PowerQueries, its new tools for letting its users create advanced search operations as they manage their log files and troubleshoot potential issues. The new service allows users to perform comp
TechCrunch

Scalyr launches PowerQueries for advanced log management

Log management service Scalyr today announced the beta launch of PowerQueries, its new tools for letting its users create advanced search operations as they manage their log files and troubleshoot potential issues. The new service allows users to perform complex actions to group, transform, filter and sort their large data sets, as well as to […]

Fortnite, copyright and the legal precedent that could still mean trouble for Epic Games

Anne Friedman Contributor Share on Twitter Anne Friedman is of counsel at DLA Piper where she focuses her practice on structuring and negotiating large scale sourcing and technology transactions. Andrew Deutsch Contributor Andrew Deutsch is a partner at DLA P
TechCrunch

Fortnite, copyright and the legal precedent that could still mean trouble for Epic Games

Anne Friedman Contributor Share on Twitter Anne Friedman is of counsel at DLA Piper where she focuses her practice on structuring and negotiating large scale sourcing and technology transactions. Andrew Deutsch Contributor Andrew Deutsch is a partner at DLA Piper concentrating on intellectual property litigation and advice, including copyright, trademark, defamation and other First Amendment […]

Hackers dropped a secret backdoor in Asus’ update software

Hackers targeted and compromised “hundreds of thousands” of Asus computer owners by pushing a backdoored update software tool from the company’s own servers. The bombshell claims, first reported by Motherboard, said the hackers digitally sig
TechCrunch

Hackers dropped a secret backdoor in Asus’ update software

Hackers targeted and compromised “hundreds of thousands” of Asus computer owners by pushing a backdoored update software tool from the company’s own servers. The bombshell claims, first reported by Motherboard, said the hackers digitally signed the Asus Live Update tool with one of the company’s own code-signing certificates before pushing it to Asus’ download servers, […]

Live from Apple’s media special event

You know Apple’s got something big in the works when it went ahead and launched new iPads, iMacs and AirPods in one week with little fanfare. And while this week’s event was a bit of a surprise, Apple’s clearly been working to it for a long time. The co
TechCrunch

Live from Apple’s media special event

You know Apple’s got something big in the works when it went ahead and launched new iPads, iMacs and AirPods in one week with little fanfare. And while this week’s event was a bit of a surprise, Apple’s clearly been working to it for a long time. The company sent out invites for “Show Time” […]

How watching TV and movies helps people with attachment issues

People who have trouble with romantic relationships may watch movies and TV shows for more than just a chance to escape from their lives for a bit. New research suggests that people with attachment issues are more likely than others to be engaged in the stori
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How watching TV and movies helps people with attachment issues

People who have trouble with romantic relationships may watch movies and TV shows for more than just a chance to escape from their lives for a bit. New research suggests that people with attachment issues are more likely than others to be engaged in the stories - for instance, to say that they feel connected to the fictional characters and think about what they would do if they were in the same situations.

Culture

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Mesmerizing Alphabetical Animations by Mr. Kaplin

Last year for the month of March, motion design studio Mr. Kaplin (previously) released a series of alphabet animations loosely inspired by an object or concept beginning with the featured letter. Reflective “R’s” and planetary “P̵
Colossal

Mesmerizing Alphabetical Animations by Mr. Kaplin

Last year for the month of March, motion design studio Mr. Kaplin (previously) released a series of alphabet animations loosely inspired by an object or concept beginning with the featured letter. Reflective “R’s” and planetary “P’s” lie at the center of the graphic short films that imagine the letters as part of continuously looping installations or machines. The project, A Month of Type, was published to the studio’s Instagram, and was also compiled into an alphabetical list of the animations with a soundtrack by BXFTYS. More

Erdogan: Istanbul's Hagia Sophia could be turned into mosque

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) - Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan says Istanbul's Hagia Sophia - a Byzantine-era cathedral that was turned into a mosque and now serves as a museum - could be reconverted into a mosque. Erdogan spoke during a television interview Su
www.washingtontimes.com stories: Travel

Erdogan: Istanbul's Hagia Sophia could be turned into mosque

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) - Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan says Istanbul's Hagia Sophia - a Byzantine-era cathedral that was turned into a mosque and now serves as a museum - could be reconverted into a mosque. Erdogan spoke during a television interview Sunday ahead of Turkey's March 31 local elections. ...

Artist Cey Adams and Pabst Blue Ribbon to Mark National Mural Day May 7, 2019

Pabst Blue Ribbon recently announced a partnership with NYC visual artist Cey Adams to launch National Mural Day, a celebration of the world's oldest and most public visual art form, on May 7. The partnership will also have Cey re-imagine Pabst Blue Ribbon's
Lifestyle

Artist Cey Adams and Pabst Blue Ribbon to Mark National Mural Day May 7, 2019

Pabst Blue Ribbon recently announced a partnership with NYC visual artist Cey Adams to launch National Mural Day, a celebration of the world's oldest and most public visual art form, on May 7. The partnership will also have Cey re-imagine Pabst Blue Ribbon's signature 12oz can and all product packaging this Spring, stated an official release.Pabst Blue Ribbon is all about making art available to everyone and inspiring America's doers, change-makers, and creatives through art. Murals are the most accessible form of art, and National Mural Day will encourage artists, landlords, and civic institutions to collaborate on creating new murals in their community. As part of National Mural Day, Pabst Blue Ribbon will be creating murals in New York City, Philadelphia, Detroit, Nashville, Denver, Charleston, Portland, Washington DC, Los Angeles, Austin, Seattle, Atlanta and other cities, according to the release.Cey's limited edition re-design will cover over 150 million Pabst Blue Ribbon cans, as well as all product packaging, putting original art from Cey in the hands of millions. Cey's minimalist concept is a contemporary tribute to the brand's famed iconography and historic blue ribbon seal of quality. It will be made available in late March, as per the release.Justin Medcraft, brand director at Pabst Blue Ribbon stated, as per the release, «Cey Adams has been a cultural force in America's art and music scene for over three decades, and Pabst Blue Ribbon is delighted to partner with him to reimagine our iconic blue ribbon through a limited edition design.» «Cey's work and ability to use art as a catalyst for positive conversation has inspired us and is something we want to amplify across America on National Mural Day.»«Pabst Blue Ribbon is a brand I always planned to explore in my work, and partnering to launch National Mural Day felt right,» said Cey Adams, as per the release. «Murals and Street Art are an important element of my work. My hope is National Mural Day will become a platform for artists and their communities to celebrate art and its rich history.»Artists will get an opportunity on National Mural Day to connect with wall owners in their local area, and Pabst Blue Ribbon has engaged with mural programs around the country to commit resources to support National Mural Day regionally. Cey will also be spotlighting three inspiring, emerging muralists in a video series launched with Pabst Blue Ribbon in mid April. Mural lovers across the country can get involved by taking photos of their favorite murals and uploading them using #NationalMuralDay, as per the release.Click on the slideshow for a sneak peek at the artist and Pabst Blue Ribbon  https://www.blouinartinfo.com/              Founder: Louise Blouin

Pakistanis protest acquittal of 4 in India train attack

LAHORE, Pakistan (AP) - Family members of Pakistanis killed in an Indian train explosion are protesting an Indian court's acquittal of four Hindus charged with triggering the blasts 12 years ago, which killed 68 passengers. At a rally in the eastern city of L
www.washingtontimes.com stories: Travel

Pakistanis protest acquittal of 4 in India train attack

LAHORE, Pakistan (AP) - Family members of Pakistanis killed in an Indian train explosion are protesting an Indian court's acquittal of four Hindus charged with triggering the blasts 12 years ago, which killed 68 passengers. At a rally in the eastern city of Lahore on Monday, relatives chanted: "We want ...

Drunk Shoppers Blow $48B Annually—Mostly on Amazon

I do most of my shopping from the comfort of my couch: In the digital age, there’s no reason to leave the house for groceries, clothes, home furnishings, or basically anything else. But […] The post Drunk Shoppers Blow $48B Annually—Mostly on Am
Geek.com

Drunk Shoppers Blow $48B Annually—Mostly on Amazon

I do most of my shopping from the comfort of my couch: In the digital age, there’s no reason to leave the house for groceries, clothes, home furnishings, or basically anything else. But […] The post Drunk Shoppers Blow $48B Annually—Mostly on Amazon appeared first on Geek.com.

Hands-On: ‘Samurai Shodown’ Revives Classic Blade Battles

When Street Fighter IV first launched a decade ago it kicked off a full-blown renaissance for classic 2D arcade fighting games. Beloved franchises like Marvel vs. Capcom and Killer Instinct returned. Stagnant series that […] The post Hands-On: ‘S
Geek.com

Hands-On: ‘Samurai Shodown’ Revives Classic Blade Battles

When Street Fighter IV first launched a decade ago it kicked off a full-blown renaissance for classic 2D arcade fighting games. Beloved franchises like Marvel vs. Capcom and Killer Instinct returned. Stagnant series that […] The post Hands-On: ‘Samurai Shodown’ Revives Classic Blade Battles appeared first on Geek.com.

Sport

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«Disappointed» Renault must be hard on itself - Abiteboul

The French car manufacturer has set sights on closing down the gap to the top three teams this season, but it endured some frustrations in Melbourne as it felt it never showed off the full potential of its car.Although Nico Hulkenberg finished seventh, Danie
Motorsport.com - All - Stories

«Disappointed» Renault must be hard on itself - Abiteboul

The French car manufacturer has set sights on closing down the gap to the top three teams this season, but it endured some frustrations in Melbourne as it felt it never showed off the full potential of its car.Although Nico Hulkenberg finished seventh, Daniel Ricciardo was forced to retire amid reliability concerns triggered by an incident at the start which broke his front wing.Abiteboul ...Keep reading

Iannone: Aprilia not making the most of existing bike

Ex-Ducati and Suzuki rider Iannone made his Aprilia race debut in Qatar earlier this month, qualifying 19th and scoring two points for finishing 14th.Teammate Aleix Espargaro enjoyed a more competitive showing as he kicked off his third campaign with the Noal
Motorsport.com - All - Stories

Iannone: Aprilia not making the most of existing bike

Ex-Ducati and Suzuki rider Iannone made his Aprilia race debut in Qatar earlier this month, qualifying 19th and scoring two points for finishing 14th.Teammate Aleix Espargaro enjoyed a more competitive showing as he kicked off his third campaign with the Noale-based manufacturer with a 10th-place finish, less than 10 seconds adrift of race winner Andrea Dovizioso.Iannone admitted after ...Keep reading

Shannon Sharpe on Rob Gronkowski: 'I believe he's the most dominant tight end to play'

Shannon Sharpe gives his thoughts on Rob Gronkowski announcing his retirement from the NFL and explains why there was nothing left for Gronk to accomplish.
FOX Sports Digital

Shannon Sharpe on Rob Gronkowski: 'I believe he's the most dominant tight end to play'

Shannon Sharpe gives his thoughts on Rob Gronkowski announcing his retirement from the NFL and explains why there was nothing left for Gronk to accomplish.

Nick Wright evaluates Zion Williamson’s clutch performance as Duke survives UCF

Nick Wright breaks down Zion Williamson's 32-point performance in Duke's 77-76 win against UCF in the second round of the NCAA tournament.
FOX Sports Digital

Nick Wright evaluates Zion Williamson’s clutch performance as Duke survives UCF

Nick Wright breaks down Zion Williamson's 32-point performance in Duke's 77-76 win against UCF in the second round of the NCAA tournament.

High court won't referee dispute over Michael Jordan images

The Supreme Court says it won't referee a dispute between Nike and a photographer who took a famous image of basketball great Michael Jordan
FOX Sports Digital

High court won't referee dispute over Michael Jordan images

The Supreme Court says it won't referee a dispute between Nike and a photographer who took a famous image of basketball great Michael Jordan

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