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How a typical government leak turned into a three-way war between Comey, McCabe and Trump

Two former allies have offered contradictory accounts of the orchestrated FBI leak that spawned an investigation

Politics

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Open thread for night owls: 'Rookie mistake' by Rick Scott resulted in steep hurricane cleanup costs

After Hurricane Irma carved a path of destruction through the Florida Keys, the task of managing the cleanup fell on Florida Gov. Rick Scott. For reasons that remain mysterious, however, Scott chose to ignore contracts already arranged by the state for cleanu
Daily Kos

Open thread for night owls: 'Rookie mistake' by Rick Scott resulted in steep hurricane cleanup costs

After Hurricane Irma carved a path of destruction through the Florida Keys, the task of managing the cleanup fell on Florida Gov. Rick Scott. For reasons that remain mysterious, however, Scott chose to ignore contracts already arranged by the state for cleanup and debris removal, instead ordering new, “emergency” contracts from other companies–including a company that had no prior emergency experience. Jim DeFede reports that we now have an estimate of how much those Scott-pushed contracts cost taxpayers: As much as $30 million. CBS4 News reviewed more than $43 million worth of invoices submitted to the state through February by Munilla Construction Management (MCM) and Community Asphalt, the two firms selected to operate in the Keys under the emergency contract. If the Governor had instead used one of the companies already under contract with the state, it would have cost taxpayers as little as $13 million to do the exact same work. Not only did Scott’s act cost substantially more than the previously arranged contracts, it caused chaos in the days following Irma, as some of those companies had already pre-positioned crews in preparation for cleanup before learning that their services would not be used. Former Homeland Security Inspector General Richard Skinner was blunt about Scott’s scrapping of existing contracts in order to sign new, non-competitive bids: “It just makes no sense at all.” TOP COMMENTS • HIGH IMPACT STORIES • THE WEEK’S HIGH IMPACT STORIES TWEET OF THE DAY xWhat the hell is this? Here’s an idea: walk down the hall and tell your husband to end HIS policy of breaking up families. https://t.co/Fvb70mKlVE— Neera Tanden 🌊 (@neeratanden) June 17, 2018 Monday through Friday you can catch the Kagro in the Morning Show 9 AM ET by dropping in here, or you can download the Stitcher app (found in the app stores or at Stitcher.com), and find a live stream there, by searching for "Netroots Radio.” LINK TO DAILY KOS STORE

Turning affluent suburbs blue is a necessary part of winning back a Democratic majority

Over the weekend, the New York Times ran a baffling and potentially harmful opinion piece by two history professors, Lily Geismer and Michael Lessner, titled “Turning Affluent Suburbs Blue Isn't Worth the Cost.” In short, they argue that affluent suburb
Daily Kos

Turning affluent suburbs blue is a necessary part of winning back a Democratic majority

Over the weekend, the New York Times ran a baffling and potentially harmful opinion piece by two history professors, Lily Geismer and Michael Lessner, titled “Turning Affluent Suburbs Blue Isn't Worth the Cost.” In short, they argue that affluent suburban districts, if they elect Democrats, are likely to elect centrists who won’t pass the kind of progressive legislation that will adequately address economic and racial inequality. The short-term benefits of winning races in those districts, they say, will eventually be outweighed by the long-term harm created from a Democratic congressional caucus that’s too heavy on economic elites and not enough “real Americans.” I’m going to propose a counterargument that may blow some minds with how off-the-wall it is: Maybe Democrats should contest as many races as possible, and try to win elections in as many places as possible, regardless of income, education, or race. There are different aspects to the Democratic agenda that can appeal to different types of people, and historically, electoral success for one party or the other has generally relied on putting up a big tent that can house a broad coalition capable of earning and sustaining a majority. Moreover, this isn’t the right time to be writing off any seats or any capable Democratic candidates because they’re too hot or too cold. Given the existential threats to American democracy currently posed by those in charge of Washington, DC, I can’t even imagine the level of detached privilege that would lead one to say that we shouldn’t try to target some of the seats that are likeliest right now to fall into our grasp, and instead focus on the groundwork for a purer and more perfect party at some point in the future. But even beyond the “well, duh” aspect of needing an all-hands-on-deck majority now to reverse the nation’s slide toward moronic authoritarianism, Geismer and Lessner’s article seems unaware of who lives in these affluent suburbs, who they currently elect, and who’s running to represent them. Their article does cover its historical bases very well, in terms of how we got here—they accurately recount how the suburbs were the destination for white flight, especially against the backdrop of the busing fights in the 1970s, and how Bill Clinton’s turn toward the center in the 1990s was instrumental in getting some of these suburbs into the Democratic column in the first place—but it seems to be all history, with little awareness of the present.

Could Trump face Magnitsky Act sanctions?

Already branded by a survey of historians as America’s worst ever, the presidency of Donald Trump may also live in infamy as the most ironic. After all, the man who ran to “Make America Great Again” has already ceded global climate leadership to China a
Daily Kos

Could Trump face Magnitsky Act sanctions?

Already branded by a survey of historians as America’s worst ever, the presidency of Donald Trump may also live in infamy as the most ironic. After all, the man who ran to “Make America Great Again” has already ceded global climate leadership to China and Europe, withdrawn from the Pacific trade partnership created by the United States, and angered American allies both by abandoning the P5+1 Iranian nuclear agreement and unilaterally triggering a trade war. The self-proclaimed “voice of the forgotten man” who promised “health insurance for everybody” has instead delivered a massive tax cut windfall for the wealthy and sabotaged health insurance coverage for millions. And a full 18 months after his election, Trump still rages against “Crooked Hillary” to rapturous cheers of “lock her up” from his ardent followers, even as special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation continues to produce a wave of indictments against his campaign team and administration. But the ironies of Donald Trump’s White House tenure may not end there. After having been aided by Russian intervention in his ascent to power, there is a chance—albeit a small one—that Trump’s fall could result from foreign powers applying an international sanctions regime to him and his family’s businesses. And adding insult to injury, those punishments would be made possible by the Magnitsky Act originally introduced in the United States to combat the corruption and human rights abuses of the Putin government in Moscow. The idea of personally sanctioning Trump arose on the eve of the American debacle at the recent G7 summit.

Sen. Mitch McConnell warns Mueller probe into Russian election tampering 'ought to wrap it up'

Given that prying a substantive comment on the Russia investigation from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is like trying to coax a turtle into doing a peppy dance number we should presume McConnell intended to send a strong message here. “What I thin
Daily Kos

Sen. Mitch McConnell warns Mueller probe into Russian election tampering 'ought to wrap it up'

Given that prying a substantive comment on the Russia investigation from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is like trying to coax a turtle into doing a peppy dance number we should presume McConnell intended to send a strong message here. “What I think about the Mueller investigation is, they ought to wrap it up. It’s gone on seemingly forever and I don’t know how much more they think they can find out,” the Kentucky Republican said in an interview with “Behind Closed Doors,” a Washington Examiner podcast. For the record, the premise of his statement is bunk. The investigation into whether U.S. persons assisted Russian government efforts to tamper with a United States presidential election has not been lengthy–by a stretch. It has gone on for only a small fraction of the time that the Watergate investigation did, a considerably more cut-rate affair, and remains several times shorter than the Republican investigations into something something Benghazi. Or, as investigation expert Marcy Wheeler put it, «Mueller has been special counsel for less time than Scalia's [Supreme Court] seat was held open until Gorsuch was confirmed.» So Mitch here is, as is typical for him, being dishonest for the sake of partisan spin. Of more note is that McConnell is piping up with the suggestion that the Russian election tampering investigation be closed at all. The investigation is, from all outside indications, proceeding at a brisk pace. Indictments, both of Russian and American citizens, are already plentiful. As McConnell offered his comment, Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort was waiting to learn whether his bail would be revoked after Manafort was caught by investigators in multiple attempts of witness tampering. Also in the news were reports that Donald Trump's longtime lawyer and fixer, Michael Cohen, had been told he could expect to himself be indicted–reports which were quickly followed by leaks from Cohen's friends suggesting that the odds of him cooperating with the investigation in exchange for leniency were high and getting higher (with ample and unsubtle hints that Trump himself could stand to lose the most if Cohen did cooperate, if the put-upon lawyer was not convinced to keep his mouth shut with the promise of an investigation-sabotaging pardon or other aid). In other words, the Republican Senate leader was giving voice to a demand that the Russia investigation close up shop real soon now even as prosecutors once again tightened the noose around the closest members of Trump's campaign circle. That has been the standard reaction from party hacks like Devin Nunes after each major indictment from Mueller's team or related investigations, but having McConnell himself say it in response to the latest revelations of Trump campaign impropriety can be counted as an escalation.

One thing that 'M*A*S*H' got wrong about the Korean War

Aside from the fact that it did not take place in Southern California, the popular television series M*A*S*H rarely showed just how bad the weather was in Korea. Filming in the California sunshine made it difficult to demonstrate how hard it was to trudge up
Daily Kos

One thing that 'M*A*S*H' got wrong about the Korean War

Aside from the fact that it did not take place in Southern California, the popular television series M*A*S*H rarely showed just how bad the weather was in Korea. Filming in the California sunshine made it difficult to demonstrate how hard it was to trudge up a snow-covered hillside carrying a 35-pound pack and a 10-pound M-1 rifle. My husband remembered the freezing weather for years. A young 1st lieutenant, he led his men in combat during the Korean War. And like so many men of his generation who fought America’s wars, he rarely discussed most aspects of combat. He did however, regularly relate the tale of waking up on one of those icy cold hillsides in Korea. His hair and eyelashes had frost on them and the frigid air made breathing painful. As he tried to force himself out of his sleeping bag he swore to whatever gods existed that should he ever get out of Korea he would never, ever, return to a place where it snowed. I never wanted to live in the desert. It was one of those compromises made in a marriage based on who had the strongest claim. There was nothing in my background that could come close to a freezing morning in Korea, so we moved to the desert, which I did come to love. He died there in 2012. And never once, in all of the years since, did it cross my mind to be glad that he was dead. Until Donald Trump decided that the North Korean coast would be a good place to build a condominium.

Mass shooting at New Jersey arts festival leaves 22 injured, one dead

A mass shooting at a New Jersey arts festival has left 22 injured and one suspect dead. Four victims are currently in critical condition, including a severely injured 13 year old child. “I had a walkie-talkie and said, ‘All hell just broke loose here,'
Daily Kos

Mass shooting at New Jersey arts festival leaves 22 injured, one dead

A mass shooting at a New Jersey arts festival has left 22 injured and one suspect dead. Four victims are currently in critical condition, including a severely injured 13 year old child. “I had a walkie-talkie and said, ‘All hell just broke loose here,'” said Bruce Toth, who has been curating the free, public art event for the past 12 years and says he was 20 feet away from the gunfire. “I just heard gunshots and everybody yelling, ‘Get down, get down, get down!’ Everybody dove under the stage.” Two suspects apparently opened fire inside the venue; security officials also «returned fire.» The remainder of the All Nights Art Festival, a 24-hour event meant to span from Saturday afternoon to Sunday, was cancelled. The shooting took place only yards from the public display of gun law reform group Moms Demand Action. xOur volunteers were not physically injured, but they are shaken. Please keep them - and everyone who was at last night’s event - in your hearts.https://t.co/T8Eei1iD2U— Shannon Watts (@shannonrwatts) June 17, 2018 One suspect was taken into custody; authorities describe the motive for the shooting only as a «neighborhood beef.» Seventeen of the 22 injured were the victim of gunshot wounds.

Economics

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From Fifa 2018 live broadcast to Jio double data offer: Last week in tech

Here is everything you need to know about the news from technology space that made headlines in June 11-17 week
Markets

From Fifa 2018 live broadcast to Jio double data offer: Last week in tech

Here is everything you need to know about the news from technology space that made headlines in June 11-17 week

Kerala govt to leverage Blockchain tech to streamline supply

The Kerala government has embarked on a strategy to leverage the Blockchain technology to streamline purchase and distribution network of milk, vegetables and fish in the state. The project is being implemented through the Kerala Development and Innovatio
Markets

Kerala govt to leverage Blockchain tech to streamline supply

The Kerala government has embarked on a strategy to leverage the Blockchain technology to streamline purchase and distribution network of milk, vegetables and fish in the state. The project is being implemented through the Kerala Development and Innovation Strategic Council (K-DISC), state's think-tank mandated to formulate and implement plans to create a healthy and conducive ecosystem with the help of new technologies. The state will also make its crop insurance scheme smarter and fool-proof, ensuring quick processing and settlement of claims to farmers suffering crop losses, a release said here today. K-DISC had recently launched a major programme to train students in Blockchain technology, providing them with the early-mover advantage in this system, which has huge job potential in India and abroad. In the dairy sector, the project will ensure speedy delivery of high quality milk by continuously monitoring production, procurement and distribution through an ...

Seven booked in Rs 22.59 lakh cheating case

Seven people have been booked for allegedly cheating a man to the tune of Rs 22.59 lakh after pursuaing him to invest in bitcoins launched by a company, police said today. A case of cheating has been registered at the Khadakpada police station. No arrest
Markets

Seven booked in Rs 22.59 lakh cheating case

Seven people have been booked for allegedly cheating a man to the tune of Rs 22.59 lakh after pursuaing him to invest in bitcoins launched by a company, police said today. A case of cheating has been registered at the Khadakpada police station. No arrest has been made so far, the police said. The victim, Raghuveer Kulkarni (45), was introduced to a bitcoin investment scheme of a company by one of his friends who promised him good returns, they said. Accordingly, since February 2017, he invested a total of Rs 22.59 lakh into the company. However, the accused, who were associated with the company, did not pay Kulkarni any money and closed down their business and fled, the police said. Bitcoin is a form of digital currency that is supposed to provide a secure and private alternative to conventional money. According to the government, bitcoins or such crypto- currencies are not legal tender in the country.

Science

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Blockchain technology could be the great equalizer for American cities

Brooks Rainwater Contributor Brooks Rainwater is the director of the Center for City Solutions and Applied Research at the National League of Cities. More posts by this contributor Do cities still want a sharing economy? As tech startups surge in cities, incl
TechCrunch

Blockchain technology could be the great equalizer for American cities

Brooks Rainwater Contributor Brooks Rainwater is the director of the Center for City Solutions and Applied Research at the National League of Cities. More posts by this contributor Do cities still want a sharing economy? As tech startups surge in cities, inclusive economic growth must be a priority The city of Austin is currently piloting a program […]

After twenty years of Salesforce, what Marc Benioff got right and wrong about the cloud

Grant Miller Contributor Share on Twitter Grant Miller is the co-founder of Replicated As we enter the 20th year of Salesforce, there’s an interesting opportunity to reflect back on the change that Marc Benioff created with the software-as-a-service (Sa
TechCrunch

After twenty years of Salesforce, what Marc Benioff got right and wrong about the cloud

Grant Miller Contributor Share on Twitter Grant Miller is the co-founder of Replicated As we enter the 20th year of Salesforce, there’s an interesting opportunity to reflect back on the change that Marc Benioff created with the software-as-a-service (SaaS) model for enterprise software with his launch of Salesforce.com. This model has been validated by the […]

Primates in peril

Primates are fascinating. They are intelligent, live in complex societies and are a vital part of the ecosystem. Lemurs, lorises, galagos, tarsiers, monkeys and apes are our closest biological relatives and just like them, humans are also primates. However, w
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Primates in peril

Primates are fascinating. They are intelligent, live in complex societies and are a vital part of the ecosystem. Lemurs, lorises, galagos, tarsiers, monkeys and apes are our closest biological relatives and just like them, humans are also primates. However, while the human population spread to all corners of the earth, many of our closest relatives are under serious threat.

Original Content podcast: ‘Queer Eye’ season two is even more of a tearjerker

It’s only been a couple months since we reviewed the first season of Netflix’s revival of Queer Eye, but the show’s Fab Five are already back with another eight episodes where they remake the homes, wardrobes and lives. For season two, howev
TechCrunch

Original Content podcast: ‘Queer Eye’ season two is even more of a tearjerker

It’s only been a couple months since we reviewed the first season of Netflix’s revival of Queer Eye, but the show’s Fab Five are already back with another eight episodes where they remake the homes, wardrobes and lives. For season two, however, they mix things up a little — not only does the format feel […]

Culture

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Park superintendent shuffle shouldn't slow bison quarantine

BOZEMAN, Mont. (AP) - Officials say the impending change in Yellowstone National Park superintendents shouldn't disrupt the progress of a quarantine program created to produce brucellosis-free bison. The Bozeman Daily Chronicle reports Tim Reid, the bison pro
www.washingtontimes.com stories: Travel

Park superintendent shuffle shouldn't slow bison quarantine

BOZEMAN, Mont. (AP) - Officials say the impending change in Yellowstone National Park superintendents shouldn't disrupt the progress of a quarantine program created to produce brucellosis-free bison. The Bozeman Daily Chronicle reports Tim Reid, the bison program manager at Yellowstone, says the transfer of a group of bull bison to ...

Nonprofit helps fund projects at Death Valley, Great Basin

LAS VEGAS (AP) - A conservation nonprofit that previously raised $80 million is using more funds to pay for improvements at Nevada's Great Basin National Park and Death Valley National Park on the Nevada-California border, among others. The Review-Journal rep
www.washingtontimes.com stories: Travel

Nonprofit helps fund projects at Death Valley, Great Basin

LAS VEGAS (AP) - A conservation nonprofit that previously raised $80 million is using more funds to pay for improvements at Nevada's Great Basin National Park and Death Valley National Park on the Nevada-California border, among others. The Review-Journal reports the San Francisco-based Fund for People in Parks has raised ...

Carlotta weakens to depression near Mexico coast

MEXICO CITY (AP) - Tropical Storm Carlotta weakened to a depression on Sunday even as it soaked Mexico's Pacific coast in the region of Zihuatanejo. Carlotta, the third named storm of the Pacific hurricane season, had maximum sustained winds of 35 mph (55 kph
www.washingtontimes.com stories: Travel

Carlotta weakens to depression near Mexico coast

MEXICO CITY (AP) - Tropical Storm Carlotta weakened to a depression on Sunday even as it soaked Mexico's Pacific coast in the region of Zihuatanejo. Carlotta, the third named storm of the Pacific hurricane season, had maximum sustained winds of 35 mph (55 kph) early Sunday afternoon, according to the ...

Delta creates special Rapid City flight for Belgian tourists

RAPID CITY, S.D. (AP) - Delta Air Lines recently created a special flight to help a group of Belgian tourists reach their South Dakota vacation after experiencing travel delays. The tourists boarded a flight from Amsterdam on May 31 as part of a reward trip f
www.washingtontimes.com stories: Travel

Delta creates special Rapid City flight for Belgian tourists

RAPID CITY, S.D. (AP) - Delta Air Lines recently created a special flight to help a group of Belgian tourists reach their South Dakota vacation after experiencing travel delays. The tourists boarded a flight from Amsterdam on May 31 as part of a reward trip for coffee roasters using creamer ...

Minnesota eagle center gets eagle art collection

WINONA, Minn. (AP) - A portion of a large collection of art and memorabilia related to eagles is on display in Minnesota. That Preston Cook donated his collection of 25,000 eagle items to the National Eagle Center in Wabasha, the Winona Daily News reported .
www.washingtontimes.com stories: Travel

Minnesota eagle center gets eagle art collection

WINONA, Minn. (AP) - A portion of a large collection of art and memorabilia related to eagles is on display in Minnesota. That Preston Cook donated his collection of 25,000 eagle items to the National Eagle Center in Wabasha, the Winona Daily News reported . Cook recently moved to Wabasha ...

North Dakota author details comeback of American buffalo

North Dakota author Francie Berg's last book about the American buffalo was a guide for adventurers eager to get out on back roads to see the historic sites where the great animal once flourished. Then she found she had more to say. The result is «Buffa
www.washingtontimes.com stories: Travel

North Dakota author details comeback of American buffalo

North Dakota author Francie Berg's last book about the American buffalo was a guide for adventurers eager to get out on back roads to see the historic sites where the great animal once flourished. Then she found she had more to say. The result is «Buffalo Heartbeats Across the Plains,» ...

Sport

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Kyrie Irving seemingly takes shot at past coaches while praising Brad Stevens

Kyrie Irving played for several coaches who did not last very long in Cleveland, and it does not sound like the star point guard thought very highly of any of them.In a recent appearance on “The Bill Simmons Podcast,” Irving had high praise for Boston Cel
Yardbarker: Rumors and Gossip

Kyrie Irving seemingly takes shot at past coaches while praising Brad Stevens

Kyrie Irving played for several coaches who did not last very long in Cleveland, and it does not sound like the star point guard thought very highly of any of them.In a recent appearance on “The Bill Simmons Podcast,” Irving had high praise for Boston Celtics coach Brad Stevens. While there’s nothing wrong with a player showing support for his coach publicly, it’s hard not to feel like the comments included some subtle jabs at Irving’s former coaches.“Brad is one of the most adaptable coaches I’ve ever been around. He’s highly intelligent about the game, about life. Talking to him is always awesome,” Irving said. “I just had dinner with him the other night. … Talking basketball with him, it’s such a relief to have a basketball mind like that who has an appreciation for the game. He doesn’t forget plays, knows when the shift in the game happens. We were going over things that could have been done differently this season, and it was a breath of fresh air talking to him.”Since Irving described it as a “relief” t

Donovan declares allegiance to US, defends supporting Mexico

Landon Donovan has come under fire over the past few days for his decision to support Mexico in the World Cup as part of a promotion for Wells Fargo, and the former U.S. soccer star felt the need to defend himself on Sunday afternoon.After the Twitter masses
Yardbarker: Rumors and Gossip

Donovan declares allegiance to US, defends supporting Mexico

Landon Donovan has come under fire over the past few days for his decision to support Mexico in the World Cup as part of a promotion for Wells Fargo, and the former U.S. soccer star felt the need to defend himself on Sunday afternoon.After the Twitter masses labeled him a “traitor” and worse, Donovan released a statement saying his loyalty to U.S. soccer should never be questioned. He also explained why he has chosen to get behind Mexico after the US failed to qualify. Donovan was even called out by one of his former teammates, but he fired back by bringing politics into the mix.It’s no secret that Donovan was angry after he was left off the U.S. World Cup roster in 2014, so some have speculated that supporting Mexico could be his way of trying to stick it to his home country. The fact that he is letting the Mexican flag fly as part of a paid campaign is the part that rubbed a lot of people the wrong way.

10 takeaways from the 2018 U.S. Open

The 2018 U.S. Open is in the books and it had a very similar feeling to 2017. Brooks Koepka became the first man in 29 years to win consecutive U.S. Opens.We know that Koepka’s achievement is great. But in reality, it’s one of the most impressive things w
Yardbarker: Rumors and Gossip

10 takeaways from the 2018 U.S. Open

The 2018 U.S. Open is in the books and it had a very similar feeling to 2017. Brooks Koepka became the first man in 29 years to win consecutive U.S. Opens.We know that Koepka’s achievement is great. But in reality, it’s one of the most impressive things we’ve seen on a golf course in a long time.Koepka’s accomplishment deserves all the praise that it will get. Similarly, the USGA deserves every bit of scorn that it will get for what happened at Shinnecock Hills on Saturday. Meanwhile, Phil Mickelson didn’t contend, but he actually provided two of the week’s main talking points.Several other highly ranked golfers, including Lefty’s old rival Tiger Woods, did not even make the cut. What does that mean for these guys?These are the biggest takeaways from the week at Shinnecock Hills.1. Brooks Koepka pulls off magnificent double Entering the week, only 21 golfers had won multiple U.S. Opens, while only six had won it in back-to-back fashion. Both of those clubs added a member this week. For the second straight yea

Dustin Johnson’s US Open hopes fade on back 9

SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. (AP) Dustin Johnson had a four-stroke lead after 36 holes and was still in striking distance heading onto the back nine in the final round of the U.S. Open.
FOX Sports Digital

Dustin Johnson’s US Open hopes fade on back 9

SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. (AP) Dustin Johnson had a four-stroke lead after 36 holes and was still in striking distance heading onto the back nine in the final round of the U.S. Open.

Taurasi leads Mercury to 8th straight win, 92-80 over Aces (Jun 17, 2018)

LAS VEGAS (AP) Diana Taurasi scored 18 of her 28 in the first half and the Phoenix Mercury ran their winning streak to eight with a 92-80 victory over the Las Vegas Aces on Sunday night.
FOX Sports Digital

Taurasi leads Mercury to 8th straight win, 92-80 over Aces (Jun 17, 2018)

LAS VEGAS (AP) Diana Taurasi scored 18 of her 28 in the first half and the Phoenix Mercury ran their winning streak to eight with a 92-80 victory over the Las Vegas Aces on Sunday night.

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